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Author Topic: Steep driveway/incline  (Read 1764 times)
SystemShark
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« on: March 04, 2008, 09:09:30 AM »

I'm looking at a house that sits ontop of a hill. There is a long winding driveway that leads up to it and if its raining, snow, or ice in the forecast I don't think it would be much fun getting up there. There is gravel on the ground but I don't have 4x4 capabilities on my car so I was wondering if any of you experienced home owners, especially in more rual areas, have any tips for me.

I wouldn't mind getting another car with 4x4 but I was wondering if there was a better material to use for the driveway. Its usually snow or rain in PA all the time :p Would paving the whole driveway be a good option? Putting some kind of textile material in, like the bumps that wake you up if you get sleepy on the highway, work better? Or should we just keep buying lots of gravel.

THANKS! I'm soo excited; I can't wait to start beekeeping at my first house. =)))
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Jerrymac
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« Reply #1 on: March 04, 2008, 09:19:08 AM »

Just guessing but I think gravel would be better traction under snow and ice than concrete. Front wheel drive is the next best thing to four wheel drive. And then throw in some snow chains.

Don't forget horse power  grin
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kathyp
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« Reply #2 on: March 04, 2008, 10:17:13 AM »

if you get ice, it doesn't matter what is under there.  same with enough snow. 4WD will get you up the hill in snow, but nothing gets you up on ice.   the problem with gravel roads is that they have to be maintained.   they tend to get ruts and holes.  they are less expensive to put down and the maintenance is not to expensive if you have a good tractor and don't mind dumping a new load of gravel from time to time.

BTDT  smiley
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« Reply #3 on: March 04, 2008, 10:25:10 AM »

If it gets direct sunlight the paving would clear quicker (melt).  But depending on the length, it could be REALLY pricey.  I've always had gravel and with a little maintenance as Kathy stated it has been fine.  Best advice I could give is get yourself a drop spreader to tow behind a tractor and stock up on some sand (it works wonders).
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indypartridge
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« Reply #4 on: March 04, 2008, 11:44:01 AM »

I'm looking at a house that sits ontop of a hill. There is a long winding driveway that leads up to it and if its raining, snow, or ice in the forecast I don't think it would be much fun getting up there. There is gravel on the ground but I don't have 4x4 capabilities on my car so I was wondering if any of you experienced home owners, especially in more rural areas, have any tips for me.
Is there room to leave your vehicle parked at the bottom? That's what many of us do in my area when it's really icy. We have gravel, and yes, it takes some maintenance, but paving is out of the question for a long drive like I have. Jerry is right about FWD being nearly as good as 4WD.

I love living on a hill: it's nice not having to deal with water in basements, water in crawlspaces, both of which I've had before.
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Bigeddie
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« Reply #5 on: March 04, 2008, 06:36:39 PM »

I think robo has the best idea. Dry sand or sand mixed with salt to keep it from freezing in the pile or container will work wonders for traction and you don't need a whole lot either. If you burn wood use ashes instead of sand, works great. Place containers at several points along the drive to make spreading easy.

Go for it!!  Winter won't last forever

Eddie
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Bigeddie
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« Reply #6 on: March 04, 2008, 06:47:41 PM »

I lived in Uniontown years ago,hills can be a bummer. I live in N. Wisc. now and we just had a slight thaw with a mist,wouldn't you know it dropped back down to zero and now we have glare ice on the side roads,my driveway(1/4mi.) and yard. More like a skating rink!!

Eddie
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« Reply #7 on: March 04, 2008, 08:04:52 PM »

If you burn wood use ashes instead of sand, works great.

Yes,  wood ashes are the best.  It is amazing how just a little bit of ashes make the ice like your walking on sand paper.   I have an outdoor wood furnace and use the ashes on the path to the house.   Only bad part about ashes are they are easily tracked into the house. Sad
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Cindi
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« Reply #8 on: March 05, 2008, 09:33:57 AM »

Systemshark.  Oooooh, I feel your excitement.  Your house on the hill sounds beautiful.  When are you planning on making a move?  You MUST tell us more about what is going on, you know we are a nosey bunch (especially me, I am the worst).  Just think of it, be it this house or another, you are going to get bees and then your life into a world that is beyond your belief with beauty will begin.  I get very excited when I hear things like this and only can wish you well, you are entering into a place where you will never turn back.  You will be under the spell of the honeybee, as so many of us here are, it cannot be helped.  These little creatures of such beauty will bring peace to your soul, they will hold you spellbound, and I kid you not, just wait.....you will see, and mark my words.  Have the most beautiful and wonderful day on this greatest of planets, earth.  Cindi

If you decide to take this place on the hill, you will find a way to combat those little things in life that worry you, like the winter and the steep incline, that is the law of attraction........
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SystemShark
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« Reply #9 on: March 05, 2008, 02:56:13 PM »

Thanks very much for all of the insigntful replies.

Unfortunatly our offer wasn't taken. It was a foreclosure house and we were the last of 6 bids going in yesterday. We found out this morning that they took an offer that was entirly cash (no financing) and had no contigencies. We were prepared to put down some money but we couldn't afford to do the whole thing and with the house sitting for 4 years we had to put in the offer the continginces of a home inspection. I guess looking back on it, was kind of a shot in the dark.

Oh well it wasn't meant to be; our home is out there somewhere! I'm sure the tips will still come in handy as allot of the homes out here are on some kind of hill.

Thanks again my friends; I look forward to picking your brains about bee's when I get started =)
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Cindi
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« Reply #10 on: March 05, 2008, 10:29:08 PM »

Systemshark. Rats!! Well, I hope that your hopes are not too dashed.  Some things are meant to be, this home was obviously not, more will come that you will love, patience, and more patience.  Have a wonderful and beautiful day.  Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
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