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Author Topic: Scorching the insides of old boxes  (Read 2797 times)
Dick Allen
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Location: Anchorage


« Reply #20 on: February 29, 2008, 11:54:49 AM »

This has been posted here a couple of times before. It comes from the Sep/Oct 2003 newsletter put out by Eric Mussen of the University of California at Davis:

“Dr. Steve Pernal, who works in one of the last government funded bee research facilities in Beaverlodge, Alberta, Canada, arrived at his job when American foulbrood (AFB) was really causing problems for some commercial beekeepers.

 He first looked at possible ways to decontaminate woodenware from hives containing dead larvae, scale, and contaminated food stores.

 1. Scorching and Virkon S were about 84% effective.

 2. Powered water was 81% effective.

 3. Scrubbing was 77% effective.

 4. Steam and lye were nearly 100% effective, as is irradiation.”

 
Notice there isn’t a huge difference in any of the methods, especially between scorching and using powered water.

 Here’s some of his past newsletters for anyone interested.

http://entomology.ucdavis.edu/faculty/mussen/news.cfm
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tillie
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Location: Atlanta, GA

Bee in N Georgia on a Blackberry flower


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« Reply #21 on: March 02, 2008, 03:33:27 PM »

By way of follow-up, I managed to scorch the boxes using a propane torch - the hardest part - don't laugh - was trying to get the cap off of the propane bottle so I could attach the flame device. 

FINALLY with a pair of pliers I managed to get it off and flame away.  It was actually kind of fun - so cool to watch the grain "rise" as Brian described....





Linda T, the arsonist lurking in Atlanta
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Mici
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Location: Zagradec, Grosuple, Lower Carniola, Slovenia

tougher than rock


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« Reply #22 on: March 02, 2008, 05:25:48 PM »

i've read that direct flame kills the spores instantly, so i don't know if you really have to darken the wood, although majority does it this way, also, better safe than sorrow.
anyway...buzzbee got my attention, sulphur sticks....this is solely from my head but...spores are technicly not really alive and have a hardy "skin" (couldn't find the term). but this is just the first thing that poped to my mind, it most probably isn't true.
now, they cook wax at 120 °C for 20 minutes.....

Job well done Tillie!
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Hayesbo
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Location: North West Georgia, USA

My son. Almost 6 and loves helping me w/the bees


« Reply #23 on: March 02, 2008, 09:40:41 PM »

Spores have "skin"    Sort of, I don't know the term either, it has been too long since my Surgical Tech training.

Surgical instruments are steam under pressure and heat sterilized. The steam/pressure is used to saturate, penetrate and crack open the spores. If I could find a way, I would steam my hives with pressure. I don't know about the lye though, how is it used? guess i need to go back and read the notes.


Steve
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