Need Bees Removed?
International
Beekeeping Forums
October 22, 2014, 11:03:54 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: Beemaster's official FACEBOOK page
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar bee removal Login Register Chat  

Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Screened bottom board  (Read 3323 times)
watercarving
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 205


Location: North Georgia


WWW
« on: February 18, 2008, 03:38:21 PM »

Thinking about adding a screened bottom board to my tbh's. It would be permanent the way I would build it. Is this a necessary piece of equipment nowadays or not? Would you run your hives without one?

Thanks.
Logged

--------------
www.johncall.com - adventures in woodcarving and country life.
Robo
Technical
Administrator
Galactic Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 6411


Location: Scenic Catskill Mountains - NY

Beekeep On!


WWW
« Reply #1 on: February 18, 2008, 04:51:41 PM »

I have gone back to solid bottom boards after 5 or so yrs of SBB.  I know there is a lot of hype about mites falling thru SBB,  but I have seen a couple of studies that showed otherwise.

There is also a theory that with solid bottom boards, the temperature and humidity of the brood nest is higher which is less ideal conditions for mites.

I know with my solid bottom boards I get a faster/bigger brood build up in the Spring.   With proper upper ventilation and slatted racks, I have no bearding issues in the summer.

I can also say that the great majority (99.9%) of feral colonies that I have removed all where sealed up pretty well.

So is it necessary? Not at all.
Logged

"Opportunity is missed by most people because it comes dressed in overalls and looks like work." - Thomas Edison


Brian D. Bray
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 7369


Location: Anacortes, WA 98221

I really look like this, just ask Cindi.


WWW
« Reply #2 on: February 18, 2008, 10:55:58 PM »

I am now going to bottomless bee hives.  Just lay screen on the bottom side of a slatted rack and stack on the supers.  I make the hive stands out of 4X4s spaced so the hive boxes rest on the stand, in other words, the inside dimensions of the stands are the same as the inside dimensions as the supers.  But then I also use top entrances (my old solid bottom boards).
Logged

Life is a school.  What have you learned?   Brian      The greatest danger to our society is apathy, vote in every election!
BenC
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 155

Location: Smithsburg, Maryland


« Reply #3 on: February 18, 2008, 11:37:23 PM »

I don't think it's necessary, it's just one way of approaching the problems associated with ventilation and moisture removal.  I've had hives with solids and hives with screens, currently they all have screens.  Perhaps you could constuct the hive body with a permanent screen but the capability to slide in a solid bottom if you decide to change later? 

Brian D. Bray, I did something similar last year.  Hive boxes sitting directly on rails of hive stands.  No slatted racks, no screens, no bottoms.  They did well.  24/7 there was a cluser of bees to be seen on the underside of the frames, it varied from baseball to softball sized.  I actually layed there and watched them a few times, I once saw the cluster "spit" out a wax moth larvae and a bee followed it to the gound and really tore into it!  What I found interesting was that the cluster of bees underneath remained as just that, they never built the nest downward, never drew any comb under those frames.  I figured with the winter coming I'd better do something to baffle wind so I reinstalled bottom boards, but I intend to try it again this season and make further observations.
Logged
JP
The Swarm King
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 11689


Location: Metairie, Louisiana

I like doing cut-outs, but I love catching swarms!


WWW
« Reply #4 on: February 19, 2008, 12:26:22 AM »

I use them because of the removals I do.  Extra ventilation on really hot days is a plus when you're dealing with a large stressed colony. Depending on your location they can be good or bad. Bad for extreme colds, good when its very hot and you want extra ventilation, but necessary, I think not. Feral colonies in bldgs and trees don't have sbbs and they do fine.

....JP
Logged

"Good friends are as sweet as honey" Winne the Pooh

My pictures can be viewed at http://picasaweb.google.com/pyxicephalus
and
http://picasaweb.google.com/112138792165178452970

My Youtube videos can be viewed here: http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=JPthebeeman&aq=f

My website JPthebeeman.com http://www.jpthebeeman.com/jpthebeeman/
dpence
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 672


Location: Holliday MO


« Reply #5 on: February 19, 2008, 03:23:03 AM »

It's a preference, not a necessity.  I have screened bottoms on my hives, but also have a sliding board which allows me to close it during the winter.  I think it helps ventilate during the summers here but then feral hives as mentioned are pretty tight.     
Logged
Jerrymac
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 6047


Location: Wolfforth Texas


« Reply #6 on: February 19, 2008, 10:34:06 AM »

Unless it is built out in the open  grin
Logged

rainbow sunflower  Light travels faster than sound. This is why some people appear bright until you hear them speak.   rainbow sunflower

 Jerry

My pictures.Type in password;  youview
     http://photobucket.com/albums/v225/Jerry-mac/
Understudy
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 4640


Location: West Palm Beach, Fl


WWW
« Reply #7 on: February 19, 2008, 04:59:05 PM »

In south Florida with a top entrance because heat is a factor here.


Sincerely,
Brendhan
Logged

The status is not quo. The world is a mess and I just need to rule it. Dr. Horrible
dpence
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 672


Location: Holliday MO


« Reply #8 on: February 20, 2008, 11:18:53 AM »

Unless it is built out in the open  grin

True...
Logged
jimmyo
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 161


Location: Indiana, USA


« Reply #9 on: February 20, 2008, 05:49:56 PM »

We use SBBs all year.  we clean them as often as we can in the spring thru fall and leave them alone in the winter. I think it helps keep the mites down to a bee-managable level. 
Jim   
Logged
Michael Bush
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 13754


Location: Nehawka, NE


WWW
« Reply #10 on: February 22, 2008, 06:41:33 PM »

>Is this a necessary piece of equipment nowadays or not?

Not.

> Would you run your hives without one?

Sure.

Half of my Langstroth equipment has SBB on them.  I like that they stay dry.  I like the added ventilation especially in the heat.  I don't think it makes any difference to Varroa except for making it easier to monitor and probably helps make any treatment more effective.
« Last Edit: February 23, 2008, 08:13:41 PM by Michael Bush » Logged

Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
-------------------
"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
Brian D. Bray
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 7369


Location: Anacortes, WA 98221

I really look like this, just ask Cindi.


WWW
« Reply #11 on: February 23, 2008, 12:40:36 AM »

Brian D. Bray, I did something similar last year.  Hive boxes sitting directly on rails of hive stands.  No slatted racks, no screens, no bottoms.  They did well.  24/7 there was a cluser of bees to be seen on the underside of the frames, it varied from baseball to softball sized.  I actually layed there and watched them a few times, I once saw the cluster "spit" out a wax moth larvae and a bee followed it to the gound and really tore into it!  What I found interesting was that the cluster of bees underneath remained as just that, they never built the nest downward, never drew any comb under those frames.  I figured with the winter coming I'd better do something to baffle wind so I reinstalled bottom boards, but I intend to try it again this season and make further observations.

I buiilt my bottomless hive stands to accept a slide in sheet of 1/4 or 3/8 inch plywood with the intent of varroa monitoring.  With the SBB I left them open all winter with no ill affects.  The slatted racks provide a layer of dead air (thermal barrier) that protects the hive from wind and cold.  Wintered 4 of 4 hives and 2 of those were 2 tall 5 frame medium nucs.  My hive stands are 2 tiers of 4X4s with 2X2 cross bracing on top of that.  The 4X4 stands are now turned so the hives face east and the solid sides of the stand block the southern winds. 
Logged

Life is a school.  What have you learned?   Brian      The greatest danger to our society is apathy, vote in every election!
Cindi
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 9827

Location: Grindrod, B.C. Canada


« Reply #12 on: February 23, 2008, 11:30:22 AM »

Last year my Husband constructed screened bottomboards for all my colonies.  I have switched back to solid bottomboards because I was using the oxalic acid vapourizing for mite death and screened bottomboards wouldn't have worked.  I am sticking with the solid only because I am too lazy to switch them back, and I know solid bottomboards are good, easy to keep clean and don't harbour the blasted earwigs like the screened bottomboards do, less place for them to hide.  Many use the screened for cooling.  Our summers are not so hot here that the bees have a difficult time dealing with heat.  Have a wonderful and great day, lovin' this groovy life. Cindi
Logged

There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
Michael Bush
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 13754


Location: Nehawka, NE


WWW
« Reply #13 on: February 23, 2008, 08:14:22 PM »

I'd keep the SBB around.  If you find a hive all bearding and you can't give them enough ventilation.  You can swap out the bottom board.  Smiley
Logged

Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
-------------------
"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
Cindi
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 9827

Location: Grindrod, B.C. Canada


« Reply #14 on: February 24, 2008, 08:05:37 AM »

Michael, yes, of course, one never knows when one requires something or the other.  I have kicked my rear end so many times for being a person that discards stuff far too quickly, thinking I'll never use it again....have a wonderful and awesome day, Cindi
Logged

There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
JP
The Swarm King
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 11689


Location: Metairie, Louisiana

I like doing cut-outs, but I love catching swarms!


WWW
« Reply #15 on: February 24, 2008, 11:19:10 AM »

I have several queen excluders lying around brand new, that perhaps one day I will use, or not. 4yrs and counting.  grin


....JP
Logged

"Good friends are as sweet as honey" Winne the Pooh

My pictures can be viewed at http://picasaweb.google.com/pyxicephalus
and
http://picasaweb.google.com/112138792165178452970

My Youtube videos can be viewed here: http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=JPthebeeman&aq=f

My website JPthebeeman.com http://www.jpthebeeman.com/jpthebeeman/
Joseph Clemens
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 382


Location: Tucson, Arizona U S A


WWW
« Reply #16 on: March 16, 2008, 12:18:18 AM »

I have several queen excluders lying around brand new, that perhaps one day I will use, or not. 4yrs and counting.  grin


....JP

Those wire ones make good cookie and cake cooling racks, when they're not being used on a hive.
Logged


<img src="[url]http://banners.wunderground.com/weathersticker/miniWeather06_both/language/www/US/AZ/Marana.gif
" border=0
alt="Click for Marana, Arizona Forecast" height=50 width=150>[/url]
Joseph Clemens
Beekeeping since 1964
10+ years in Tucson, Arizona
12+ hives and 15+ nucs
No chemicals -- no treatments of any kind, EVER.
JP
The Swarm King
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 11689


Location: Metairie, Louisiana

I like doing cut-outs, but I love catching swarms!


WWW
« Reply #17 on: March 16, 2008, 09:42:40 AM »

I have several queen excluders lying around brand new, that perhaps one day I will use, or not. 4yrs and counting.  grin


....JP

Those wire ones make good cookie and cake cooling racks, when they're not being used on a hive.

Thanks Joseph, not much of a baker here though. I do bake chicken and fish though.

...JP
Logged

"Good friends are as sweet as honey" Winne the Pooh

My pictures can be viewed at http://picasaweb.google.com/pyxicephalus
and
http://picasaweb.google.com/112138792165178452970

My Youtube videos can be viewed here: http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=JPthebeeman&aq=f

My website JPthebeeman.com http://www.jpthebeeman.com/jpthebeeman/
Cindi
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 9827

Location: Grindrod, B.C. Canada


« Reply #18 on: March 16, 2008, 10:06:57 AM »

I bet the excluders would work great as a grill on a fire pit, more use for those queen excluders that I have so many of, hee, hee.  Beautiful day in this beautiful life, Cindi
Logged

There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
Brian D. Bray
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 7369


Location: Anacortes, WA 98221

I really look like this, just ask Cindi.


WWW
« Reply #19 on: March 17, 2008, 10:41:28 PM »

I have several queen excluders lying around brand new, that perhaps one day I will use, or not. 4yrs and counting.  grin


....JP

Those wire ones make good cookie and cake cooling racks, when they're not being used on a hive.

Use for a capping strainer when uncapping your frames.  I have three 8 frame, unused since I bought them, because I haven't encountered the few instances I would actually use one.
Logged

Life is a school.  What have you learned?   Brian      The greatest danger to our society is apathy, vote in every election!
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Beemaster's Beekeeping Ring
Previous | Home | Join | Random | Next
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines | Sitemap Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 1.482 seconds with 22 queries.

Google visited last this page October 11, 2014, 08:03:52 PM
anything