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Author Topic: feeders  (Read 11288 times)

Anonymous

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feeders
« on: October 02, 2004, 12:20:09 PM »
which feeders is better? Top feeder, external feeder, or the one thats with the frames? I want one thats gonna be best for my future bees, enabling them to be more productive.

Offline Robo

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« Reply #1 on: October 02, 2004, 06:41:37 PM »
My favorite is a gallon glass pickle jar with 4 - 1/16" holes drilled in the lid inverted over the inner cover hole.
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Offline golfpsycho

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« Reply #2 on: October 02, 2004, 07:00:32 PM »
I use pretty much the same technique as Robo, although I put more holes in the lid, and just use a nail.  Having more holes hasn't caused the jar to loose vacuum, and they take it very fast.

Offline buzz

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« Reply #3 on: October 02, 2004, 09:38:51 PM »
I find it hard to find gallon jars, so i use a boardman feeder. Just stay away from those frame feeders, I lost hundreds of bees from drowning with one of those
Scott
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Offline Robo

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« Reply #4 on: October 02, 2004, 10:20:25 PM »
Quote from: buzz
I find it hard to find gallon jars


Ask at your local deli, they are usually free for the asking.
"Opportunity is missed by most people because it comes dressed in overalls and looks like work." - Thomas Edison



Offline BigRog

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« Reply #5 on: October 03, 2004, 01:48:39 AM »
or go shopping at your local mega mart
"Lurch my good man,…what did you mean when you said just now that 'You've got better things to do than run my petty little errands'…….?"

Anonymous

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« Reply #6 on: October 03, 2004, 08:55:26 PM »
Thanks ya'll, I knew I could count on ya for advice. Do you have pics of the jar  type feeders? I can't picture it, Im gonna check on the boardman too , do you have a pic of it in the hive?

                                                    Debbie

Offline Robo

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« Reply #7 on: October 03, 2004, 09:19:05 PM »
Here is a picture of the gallon glass jar.


click image for larger view


Here is a picture with a quart jar, but I use the gallon jars in the same manner with a deep super around it.



click image for larger view
« Last Edit: December 04, 2007, 04:06:58 PM by Robo »
"Opportunity is missed by most people because it comes dressed in overalls and looks like work." - Thomas Edison



Anonymous

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« Reply #8 on: October 04, 2004, 06:21:47 PM »
ok, so the ventilation holes keep the syrup from molding? With the holes on the lid of the jar it isnt constantly dripping?

Offline Robo

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« Reply #9 on: October 04, 2004, 06:39:38 PM »
No,  the ventilation box really has nothing to do with it, except the quart jars fit nicely inside.  With the gallon jar,  I just use a good old deep super with no ventilation holes.

To prevent the syrup from molding, you can add a Tbs of cider vinegar,  some HoneyBHealthy, or equivalent.

The inverted jar forms a vacuum and does not drip.  You should not use plastic, because it expands and contracts with temperature fluctuations and does drip.
"Opportunity is missed by most people because it comes dressed in overalls and looks like work." - Thomas Edison



Offline buzz

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« Reply #10 on: October 04, 2004, 09:56:33 PM »
Heres a picture of my boardman feeder.

Scott
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Offline Finman

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« Reply #11 on: December 08, 2004, 04:46:54 PM »
Here is a feeding box model which  I have used 20 years. It is 8 liters.


Offline Jay

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« Reply #12 on: December 08, 2004, 05:00:19 PM »
Whichever feeder you choose, try to use an internal, rather than an external feeder to guard against robbing.  That is why all of the pickle jars you see being used are covered with a large super. BeeMax also makes a good hive top feeder.
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Offline Barny

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« Reply #13 on: December 08, 2004, 05:14:13 PM »
Does sugar water "wick" well?  If so would a tupperware bin with felt (or something like felt) allow for more feeding and no worries of spilling your sugar water or drowning your bees?

Offline Beth Kirkley

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« Reply #14 on: December 08, 2004, 08:04:44 PM »
It won't wick too well. Felt might soak up the sugar water, but I would imagine only if you placed it on top of the sugar water. But then will it float? or get too saturated and sink? I'm not sure on that. But it wouldn't work to put part of the felt in the container, and part out. Thin strips of wood float on sugar water though. If you're trying to think of some way to use just any ol' container (a large square tuperware for instance), my thoughts would be to place something other than felt in there. Unless you experiment and find the felt floats fine - and actually DOES soak up a little of the sugar water. But another suggestion might be making a "raft" of thin strips of wood. But will the bees get too wet and have to spead out more to get at the sugar water? Could this be rather cold for them?

Really though, the inverted glass jar is very easy and works great. But one key to the inverted jar is making the holes in the lid very small. I have my husband do this since he's stronger than me. We use a sewing needle, and he holds it with needle nose pliers - then pushes it down into the lid for several holes. A nail is too large.
I use a couple pickle jars and just place them over the ventilation area on my home-made inner covers. (My inner covers don't have just one hole in the middle, but instead have an open strip all the way down the middle.)

Beth

Offline TwT

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« Reply #15 on: December 08, 2004, 08:23:21 PM »
I'm going to try this hivetop feeder this coming year got 5 of them .

http://www.betterbee.com/products.asp?dept=409
THAT's ME TO THE LEFT JUST 5 YEARS FROM NOW!!!!!!!!

Never be afraid to try something new.
Amateurs built the ark,
Professionals built the Titanic

Offline Kris^

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« Reply #16 on: December 08, 2004, 10:23:40 PM »
The problem I have with the inverted-jar type feeder is that the sugar comes out of solution and ends up plugging the holes.  I've tried boiling the syrup beyond the point where all the sugar dissolves, and invariably, after a cold night, the holes gum up.

Any suggestions?

-- Kris

Offline Barny

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« Reply #17 on: December 09, 2004, 01:04:34 AM »
Actually, I was referring to wicking sheets as in bottom feeders for plants.  Placing part of the felt in the sugar water and a big mat outside of the sugarwater container, allowing the mix to "wick" up the mat and to a safe place where the bees can drink.

Offline Finman

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« Reply #18 on: December 09, 2004, 05:36:07 AM »
Quote from: Beth Kirkley
Thin strips of wood float on sugar water though.


If you heat the wood strip and let is soak bee wax inside, it keeps it's floating features. Otherwise wood becomes waterlogged .

Offline Beth Kirkley

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« Reply #19 on: December 09, 2004, 11:43:48 AM »
I have never had a problem with useing wood. I do nothing to it - just useing a thin strip and toss in the frame feeder. I've been useing the same strip of wood since I started (8 or more months? in the last 18 months).

Beth

 

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