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Author Topic: What are you Growing?  (Read 5393 times)
ooptec
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« Reply #20 on: February 12, 2008, 06:06:02 PM »

Pot
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Cindi
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« Reply #21 on: February 12, 2008, 11:06:17 PM »

Ooooh Peter, you are a naughty boy!!!!  Have a great and awesome day, love this great life.  Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
Understudy
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« Reply #22 on: February 12, 2008, 11:48:26 PM »

Pot

Well you have to have something to put in the smoker.  afro

Sincerely,
Brendhan

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The status is not quo. The world is a mess and I just need to rule it. Dr. Horrible
abejaruco
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« Reply #23 on: February 13, 2008, 03:00:38 AM »

Don´t you have wild asparagus in the forest?
Here it´s the time now. Wild asparagus are bitter, stronger flavoured, fantastic to fry them in olive oil and add to the omelete.



So, walking and walking, looking for among the bushes, you can harvest a good futurible omelete, like that couple of ancients in the photo.

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ooptec
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« Reply #24 on: February 13, 2008, 11:21:37 AM »

We have fiddlehead ferns here and are very tasty

But is a long way from thinking about that -27°C (-17°F) here for last few weeks and till weekend where they are threatening us w/around 0°C (32°F)

Though funny thing, has been bitterly cold here (even for us    lol) for awhile now and the other day it broke warming up to -17°C (1°F) and even the tho the girls are in shop kept at constant 4-5°C (35°F) when warmed up a little outside a few went for cleansing flights, or perhaps just kamikazi flights to the windows    lol

cheers

peter
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KONASDAD
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« Reply #25 on: February 13, 2008, 11:34:24 AM »

I recovered about 10 asparagus plants this fasll and trans[planted them. I hope I get a crop! Never had asparagus before but love them. Good for your kidneys!

Hope you planted them deep with lots of cow compost.


I hope I did plant deep enough. No manure, but good young compost. I would be bummed if they die. I placed them the same depth as they were growing, keeping my fibgers crossed....
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Cindi
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« Reply #26 on: February 14, 2008, 08:24:47 AM »

Konasdad, you will soon know, hee, hee.  The compost is really good too, they just love to be fed, they are heavy, heavy feeders.  This will be the first year of the transplant. REMEMBER!!!!  Don't take all the shoots, this first year I would actually be quite gentle on them and harvest just a few, enough for a few good meals.  This is their year of build up (just like the bees in the first year).  The ferns that will grow so beautiful and tall from the spears will nourish the roots for the next year. In the fall after the die back of the fronds, then remove that stuff, don't let it overwinter on the asparagus patch, that brings on pests that harbour in the debris.  I know that, because we have two species of asparagus beetle that are almost non-existent now, because I have been so diligent about the patch clean up.  Before when I used to compost the fronds, I had issues big time the next year with the beetles.  Good luck, enjoy those spears.  Have a wonderful and awesome day, this is the life to love.  Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
KONASDAD
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« Reply #27 on: February 14, 2008, 11:12:34 AM »

these were transplanted from a graden I was losing to weeds. They are very mature and I hope they survive!
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"The more complex the Mind, the Greater the need for the simplicity of Play".
Cindi
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« Reply #28 on: February 15, 2008, 09:01:25 AM »

Konasdad, they will survive, they are crazy stuff and have a will to live like every other plant, gonna give you some of those early spring treats they offer to the human race, hee, hee, have an awesome and wonderful day, love our earth, Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
asprince
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« Reply #29 on: February 21, 2008, 04:57:05 PM »

Last weekend I planted about a 200 ft row (total) of potatoes, red and white. That will yield lots of taters. I usually plant a few red ones but a friend gave me a box of white seed potatoes. It was more than I needed but I did not want them to waste so I planted them. I have the garden space. There will be plenty to share.

Something is wrong with my asparagus. My bed is three years old now and has NEVER produced enough for a meal. I started with 20 crowns and last year I transplanted several crowns of wild asparagus. I guess I will see in a few weeks.

Steve
 
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Brian D. Bray
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« Reply #30 on: February 21, 2008, 08:45:03 PM »

Most asparagas beds don't begin to produce enough to eat until the 3rd at the earliest.  Most hortoculturist will tell you to ignore them for the 1st two years other than breaking the stems and bending them over.  Year 3 you will start getting a meal or 2 of slender stalks and more each year there after.  Also never harvest every stem, leave a few at the end of the season and bend them over.
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Life is a school.  What have you learned?   Brian      The greatest danger to our society is apathy, vote in every election!
Cindi
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« Reply #31 on: February 22, 2008, 09:51:04 AM »

Steve, I'm not quite getting it.  You say that you have a crop three years old, and you planted 20 crowns last year.  Elaborate a little bit more.  Did you plant the crowns at least 1 foot apart?  Pardon me, I am not trying to be an expert, but I want to see if I can help you.

These crowns that you planted last year, don't touch them for at least another 2 years, allow them to mature to provide food for you.

The crowns that you have had in for three years, now this year they should begin to produce some that you can eat, don't take them all.  Leave lots in the ground to grow up to produce next years crowns, which you should begin to harvest even more.

With asparagus you need to look at the big picture, years down the road.  No harvesting until after the third year, and then only a few.  The fourth year and forward they will provide food for the table.

Did you put lots of manure on compost on them?  They are heavy feeders, really heavy.  They love, and I mean love, to be fed, lots.......They like drainage, they like lots of moisture too at the same time.

So, friend, elaborate. I might be able to help you out a little bit, lean on me.  Have a wonderful and beautiful day, love our lives we live. Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
asprince
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« Reply #32 on: February 22, 2008, 08:37:28 PM »

Thanks Cindi, I planted 20 crowns three years ago and transplanted some wild crowns (clumps) last year. I think the manure and compost may be the problem. I gave the a little fertilizer last year and some ground maple leaves. Asparagus grows wild by the road. It seems to do pretty good on it's own, so that has been my guide. Plan A is not working so it is time for plan B.

Thanks again, Steve   
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Politics is supposed to be the second oldest profession. I have come to realize that it bears a very close resembalance to the first. - Ronald Reagan
reinbeau
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« Reply #33 on: February 22, 2008, 09:16:01 PM »

Thanks Cindi, I planted 20 crowns three years ago and transplanted some wild crowns (clumps) last year. I think the manure and compost may be the problem. I gave the a little fertilizer last year and some ground maple leaves. Asparagus grows wild by the road. It seems to do pretty good on it's own, so that has been my guide. Plan A is not working so it is time for plan B.

Thanks again, Steve   

Steve, compost and manure are not the problem.  Is the bed in full sun?  Does it get a steady supply (but not too wet!) supply of moisture?  Is the soil neutral on the pH scale?  My bed was installed three years ago, this is going to be the year I am expecting a good harvest.  Since asparagus is in the lily family, I use a good organic bulb food on them (yes, I know they're not a bulb, but the rootstock is important on asparagus, the fertility needs are the same) and layer on four inches of well-composted manure right now, before anything comes up. 
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- Ann, A Gardening Beek -  ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ

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Cindi
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« Reply #34 on: February 23, 2008, 09:59:08 AM »

Thanks Cindi, I planted 20 crowns three years ago and transplanted some wild crowns (clumps) last year. I think the manure and compost may be the problem. I gave the a little fertilizer last year and some ground maple leaves. Asparagus grows wild by the road. It seems to do pretty good on it's own, so that has been my guide. Plan A is not working so it is time for plan B.

Thanks again, Steve   

Steve, compost and manure are not the problem.  Is the bed in full sun?  Does it get a steady supply (but not too wet!) supply of moisture?  Is the soil neutral on the pH scale?  My bed was installed three years ago, this is going to be the year I am expecting a good harvest.  Since asparagus is in the lily family, I use a good organic bulb food on them (yes, I know they're not a bulb, but the rootstock is important on asparagus, the fertility needs are the same) and layer on four inches of well-composted manure right now, before anything comes up. 

Steve, I agree with Ann about the manure and compost, they love that stuff!!!  Listen to her words, they are good and full of excellent knowledge.  Pile on the manure and compost too (if you have it).

Now Ann, a queery for you......you say a good ORGANIC bulb food, yep, organic is the best, of course, the only root/bulb food that I use is bonemeal (eeeks!!!  I hope that is considered organic), if it isn't, oh well, I am a firm believer in bonemeal....Ann, would you say that bonemeal is the same bulb food that you speak of?  I am kind of thinkin' so, bonemeal is for bulbs, trees, etc.  I didn't realize asparagus is in the lily family, so funny how so many plants are of the same line eh?  Have a wonderful and beautiful day, loving our great life.  Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
reinbeau
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« Reply #35 on: February 23, 2008, 10:50:57 AM »

I know I said organic, but I meant organically based.  I use Espoma Bulbtone on all of my bulb, rhizomes, and plants that have thick roots like peonies.  My garlic gets a good dose when it goes into the ground and I'll put some on soon again, as soon as the ground begins to thaw.  Bulbtone gives many nutrients besides the phosphorous and calcium bonemeal contains.  I've used many of the Espoma products, I really like their organic (yes, this time I mean truly organic) lawn food, it doesn't make the grass grow like crazy, just nice and green and thick.
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- Ann, A Gardening Beek -  ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ

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Cindi
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« Reply #36 on: February 23, 2008, 11:18:30 AM »

Ann, good, I have to go to the nursery today to get some sunshine mix to start seedlings, so I am going to see if we have this brand, Epsoma, not sure if it is here in Canada, haven't noticed it,but gonna check it out, talkin' to ya.  Have a wonderful, great day, Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
KONASDAD
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« Reply #37 on: February 23, 2008, 12:52:22 PM »

thganx for me too. Now I have too find some horse manure. Looked on craigs list and found free pickup full w/ $10 loading fee. Like Understudy, I may be needing a truck soon.
How long must one age manure before it can be used?
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reinbeau
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« Reply #38 on: February 23, 2008, 02:08:43 PM »

Well, if you get it now, how long is it til you start to plant?  Because if you've got six or eight weeks before that time, you can spread it out now, it'll mellow and age, and the rain/snow water will run any runoff into your soil.  If you're going to put it on actively growing garden areas you need to let it age for about three months or so.  Chicken manure is hotter, that's a good six to eight months in a compost pile before you can use it - sparingly!
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- Ann, A Gardening Beek -  ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ

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suprstakr
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« Reply #39 on: February 23, 2008, 06:00:59 PM »

Rabbit manure is best  , you can put it right on the plant and will not burn .Do not use too much on blooming plants it will make them produce lots of foliage .
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