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Author Topic: What are you Growing?  (Read 5171 times)
MrILoveTheAnts
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« on: February 03, 2008, 08:05:44 PM »

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v735/mrilovetheants/Plants/PlantShelf.jpg

I'm probably two weeks early for the aria but apparently 2 out of 3 groundhogs believe spring will be coming early. Punxsutawney Phil seems to think Global Warming is a myth. Though I don't have the land for most of these plants, as I've said in other threads, I'll be giving some to friends and relatives. Of all of the plants I'm trying to grow I'm going for at least 10 of each. So I planted a bunch maybe 3 days ago and expected it would take them 7 to 14 days for them to germinate, just as it read on each packet. Well about 1/3 of them have already started coming up so hopefully they can hold out until spring. This is the first year I'm doing this so hopefully I'll learn a lot about growing them. I've got plenty of pots to transplant them if they're really in need of space.

Onion
Cucumbers: My parents tell me I need to grow them on hills but I read they'll grow just as a tomato plant does when given a lattice.
Sage
Sweet Corn
Pepper (green)
Mallow (rose pink): Meant for butterflies but it's resemblance to Rose of Sharon annoys me.
Dahlia (dwarf mix): I'm not happy with the mixed color but at least they're small.
Canterbury Bells: A biannual, I guess that means they don't bloom until the second year? But does it live past that?
Lavender: A different type and shade of blue then what I've already grown, I really want to make a boarder of alternating blues.
Basil and Oregano: At some point I need to ask how these are harvested and used in cooking.
Watermelon (sugar baby): Very small watermelons, I look forward to trying them out.
Tomatoes (both Delicious, and Super Sweets): My dad always plants them with the annoying habit of not caring what's already planted in a space. So this year I said I'd take over.
Sunflowers (both Mexican, and Skyscraper) Mexican sunflowers look more like daises, but what surprises most people is that they're an 4 to 6 feet tall and around Annual. Basically an instant bush. Skyscraper grows 12 to 14 feet tall and hopefully doesn't fall over. I like the idea of looking up at the birds as they eat the seeds. Goldfinches in particular love them.
Cosmos (orange)
Convolvulus (Creeping Morning Glory): Honestly I hate creeping plants. This is an annual and I hope it never comes back after this year.
Coleus: Similar to a Hosta, but they're an annual with neat colored leaves. Basically the front garden gets almost no sunlight at all and everything we've planted there besides Hostas have died. Hopefully their flowers will be good for the bees.

So that's what I'm growing so far, and I'll likely get another flat of seeds growing. Now what are you growing? 
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Angi_H
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« Reply #1 on: February 04, 2008, 01:13:20 AM »

Ok here is my list. I am also a certified producer for Farmers Markets.

Heirloom tomatoes paste types, cherry types and Beef steak types. All different colors and all different types for a total of 20 varietys and 60 plants.

Heirloom Squashes about 5 varietys

Heirloom garlic and onions and shallots,

Heirloom Pumpkins and cantalopes and watermellons,

15 different herbs

Heirloom Asparagus

4 types of wine grapes and 3 reg  grapes

Varrigated pink lemon

Navel Oranges

Strawberries, Blueberries, razberries

Potatoes

Sunflowers, and lots and lots of clover and pollen and necter flowers for the bees. I have other veggies on plan just my mind went blank. Plus being a certified producer for the veggies and eggs. I will sale eggs Duck, Chicken< Quail and turkey eating eggs and hatching eggs as well as chicks and poults


Angi
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Cindi
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« Reply #2 on: February 04, 2008, 08:17:13 AM »

MrILoveTheAnts.  I will compile a list later of what I am planting, but I am going to comment on a couple that you are growing that you had queeries about.  You are doing excellent with the seed propogation.  Now it sure is fun, eh?  Good luck!!!!

<Cucumbers: My parents tell me I need to grow them on hills but I read they'll grow just as a tomato plant does when given a lattice.
I grow cucumbers on the ground, I don't bother with hills.  I also grow cucumbers up trellises, like chicken wire strung along, they grow up and then hang over the other side, it works and it a great space saver.

<Mallow (rose pink): Meant for butterflies but it's resemblance to Rose of Sharon annoys me.
I grow a species of mallow, it is called Lavatera, it is beautiful, it is like a plant that grows about 2 feet tall, covered in beautiful deep pink flower that look like a hybiscus, much more pretty than the mallow, which has a nice flower, but the lavatera flower is larger and very beautifully deep in size, it self-seeds around here, comes up everywhere.

<Canterbury Bells: A biannual, I guess that means they don't bloom until the second year? But does it live past that?
A bieannial flower does not bloom the first year, the second year it has beautiful flowers, then this plant dies.  It only lives for two seasons.  Quite often with biennials though, the mother plant will set seeds and that carries on the species.  This makes it appear like the mother plant never really dies.  Biennials are wonderful to have.  I have some and they have been here since I first planted them, over 15 years ago, they just keep going and going and going.

<Lavender: A different type and shade of blue then what I've already grown, I really want to make a boarder of alternating blues.
If you want some really pretty blue border plants, then think about Lobelia, Crystal Palace, an exciting colour of deep marine blue, cornflowers (dwarf) are pretty blue, ageratum, also comes in a pretty blue, good for borders.  Google blue border plants, you will be surprised how many shades of blues there are (purple is called blue too, so that can be confusing).

<Coleus: Similar to a Hosta, but they're an annual with neat colored leaves. Basically the front garden gets almost no sunlight at all and everything we've planted there besides Hostas have died. Hopefully their flowers will be good for the bees.
Coleus do well in shaded areas, yes, hostas do love that cooler, low light condition too.  If the hostas do well there, get some different cultivars, (or divide yours), they LOVE to be divided.  I began with about 6 of the Royal Standard many years ago, now I have tons of hosta clumps everywhere, trust me, they love division.  The Royal Standard (get that one if you can) has a beautiful white flower stalk that is EXTREMELY fragrant, smells alot like Gardenia, you would love it.
Have the best and most wonderful day, Cindi
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« Reply #3 on: February 04, 2008, 08:19:35 AM »

Angi, you have got your hands full.  Being a certified organic grower would be in my mind, a great amount of work, I think that you are doing a wonderful job, takin' my hat off to you.  Have a wonderful and great day, Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
MrILoveTheAnts
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« Reply #4 on: February 04, 2008, 02:36:42 PM »

Thanks Cindi.

In my writing I completely forgot I had written a few on the back of the card too.

Blanket Flower: Can't wait for these to bloom, seems they also attract some birds too.
Zinnia: I have tons of these from god knows where.
and Poppies

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Kimbrell
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« Reply #5 on: February 04, 2008, 04:27:23 PM »

MrILOVETHEANTS
Have you ever considered ferns for your shady front garden?  I have a shade garden with one corner filled with different kinds and colors of ferns and forget me nots.  Easy to grow and they fill in a lot of space.

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mark
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« Reply #6 on: February 04, 2008, 05:05:45 PM »

OLD and TIRED!
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MrILoveTheAnts
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« Reply #7 on: February 04, 2008, 05:39:13 PM »

Angi_H: How do you keep Heirloom verities of Pumpkins? I understand they can crossbreed with things like squash, have you ever had this as a problem?
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Kimbrell
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« Reply #8 on: February 04, 2008, 10:14:59 PM »

Mark,
Ferns and forget me nots may be old and tired.  But  it pleases me to have them in my garden and I think that's all that matters.
Maybe you have some suggestions for something new and exciting to fill a shady spot?
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« Reply #9 on: February 04, 2008, 10:25:35 PM »

I am real good with weeds.

My wife on the other hand:
Mustard greens.
Heirloom purple cherokee tomatos
Cherry tomatos
Carrots
Peppers
String beans
Eggplant
and more stuff that she will try to sneak into my plate.

Sincerely,
Brendhan

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Brian D. Bray
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« Reply #10 on: February 04, 2008, 11:17:51 PM »

Brendhan, glad you added an s on weed.  It's illegal otherwise.

I'm growing decrepit, short tempered (in my old age), and totally involved with the birds (pigeons & chickens) and the bees.
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« Reply #11 on: February 05, 2008, 09:10:47 AM »

MrILoveTheAnts.   Blanket flower, aka, Gaillardia.  A perennial.  Yes, the bees love it!!!!!  Hold on, gonna go grab a picture.



And this is the picture of one of my borders that has Crystal Palace Lobelia, and bees love it too.



Have a wonderful and great day, Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
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« Reply #12 on: February 05, 2008, 04:50:53 PM »

kimbrell    sorry, little misunderstanding here.....
question was what are you growing?
 i am growing old and tired....   bad shorthand i guess embarassed
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Kimbrell
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« Reply #13 on: February 05, 2008, 10:17:13 PM »

No problem, Mark.  So what ARE you growing?  After seeing Cindi's beautiful pictures, I want anything that's in her garden!
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KONASDAD
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« Reply #14 on: February 07, 2008, 10:22:17 AM »

For those shady area I just love Cardinal Flower(lobelia cardinalis). Hummingbirds and bumbles love it, too long a flower for bees though. Butterflies like it too. Anything from the primulas family and of course Lily of the valley for shade. Haven't decdided my veggie yets, but will be doing lots of onions, garlic, and of course tomatoes galore! Cucumbers do very well here too. Get hundreds from about six vines. Pumkin didn't do so well last year and the vine was huge. Need more room for them than I gave them. Want to put grapes in too. So many desires, so few dollars!
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« Reply #15 on: February 08, 2008, 03:30:58 PM »

I'm not even close to planning what I'm going to plant yet.

On the bright side, I've got a couple of HUGE compost piles that will be ready in a month!
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« Reply #16 on: February 08, 2008, 07:16:19 PM »

As soon as the ground dries a little, I will be planting my potatoes, broccoli, and cabbage. Cleaned up my asparagus bed today, awaiting sprouts.

Steve 
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« Reply #17 on: February 09, 2008, 10:27:20 AM »

Steve, ah, the asparagus shoots, I can't wait.  Ours don't show their pretty little heads until about the 3rd week of April.  Maybe this year they will even be a little later, but yep, yep, spring time is a'comin'.  Have a beautiful day on this great earth we share.  Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
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« Reply #18 on: February 11, 2008, 11:10:20 AM »

I recovered about 10 asparagus plants this fasll and trans[planted them. I hope I get a crop! Never had asparagus before but love them. Good for your kidneys!
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« Reply #19 on: February 12, 2008, 03:34:32 AM »

I recovered about 10 asparagus plants this fasll and trans[planted them. I hope I get a crop! Never had asparagus before but love them. Good for your kidneys!

Hope you planted them deep with lots of cow compost.
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« Reply #20 on: February 12, 2008, 06:06:02 PM »

Pot
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Cindi
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« Reply #21 on: February 12, 2008, 11:06:17 PM »

Ooooh Peter, you are a naughty boy!!!!  Have a great and awesome day, love this great life.  Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
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« Reply #22 on: February 12, 2008, 11:48:26 PM »

Pot

Well you have to have something to put in the smoker.  afro

Sincerely,
Brendhan

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« Reply #23 on: February 13, 2008, 03:00:38 AM »

Don´t you have wild asparagus in the forest?
Here it´s the time now. Wild asparagus are bitter, stronger flavoured, fantastic to fry them in olive oil and add to the omelete.



So, walking and walking, looking for among the bushes, you can harvest a good futurible omelete, like that couple of ancients in the photo.

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« Reply #24 on: February 13, 2008, 11:21:37 AM »

We have fiddlehead ferns here and are very tasty

But is a long way from thinking about that -27°C (-17°F) here for last few weeks and till weekend where they are threatening us w/around 0°C (32°F)

Though funny thing, has been bitterly cold here (even for us    lol) for awhile now and the other day it broke warming up to -17°C (1°F) and even the tho the girls are in shop kept at constant 4-5°C (35°F) when warmed up a little outside a few went for cleansing flights, or perhaps just kamikazi flights to the windows    lol

cheers

peter
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« Reply #25 on: February 13, 2008, 11:34:24 AM »

I recovered about 10 asparagus plants this fasll and trans[planted them. I hope I get a crop! Never had asparagus before but love them. Good for your kidneys!

Hope you planted them deep with lots of cow compost.


I hope I did plant deep enough. No manure, but good young compost. I would be bummed if they die. I placed them the same depth as they were growing, keeping my fibgers crossed....
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« Reply #26 on: February 14, 2008, 08:24:47 AM »

Konasdad, you will soon know, hee, hee.  The compost is really good too, they just love to be fed, they are heavy, heavy feeders.  This will be the first year of the transplant. REMEMBER!!!!  Don't take all the shoots, this first year I would actually be quite gentle on them and harvest just a few, enough for a few good meals.  This is their year of build up (just like the bees in the first year).  The ferns that will grow so beautiful and tall from the spears will nourish the roots for the next year. In the fall after the die back of the fronds, then remove that stuff, don't let it overwinter on the asparagus patch, that brings on pests that harbour in the debris.  I know that, because we have two species of asparagus beetle that are almost non-existent now, because I have been so diligent about the patch clean up.  Before when I used to compost the fronds, I had issues big time the next year with the beetles.  Good luck, enjoy those spears.  Have a wonderful and awesome day, this is the life to love.  Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
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« Reply #27 on: February 14, 2008, 11:12:34 AM »

these were transplanted from a graden I was losing to weeds. They are very mature and I hope they survive!
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« Reply #28 on: February 15, 2008, 09:01:25 AM »

Konasdad, they will survive, they are crazy stuff and have a will to live like every other plant, gonna give you some of those early spring treats they offer to the human race, hee, hee, have an awesome and wonderful day, love our earth, Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
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« Reply #29 on: February 21, 2008, 04:57:05 PM »

Last weekend I planted about a 200 ft row (total) of potatoes, red and white. That will yield lots of taters. I usually plant a few red ones but a friend gave me a box of white seed potatoes. It was more than I needed but I did not want them to waste so I planted them. I have the garden space. There will be plenty to share.

Something is wrong with my asparagus. My bed is three years old now and has NEVER produced enough for a meal. I started with 20 crowns and last year I transplanted several crowns of wild asparagus. I guess I will see in a few weeks.

Steve
 
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« Reply #30 on: February 21, 2008, 08:45:03 PM »

Most asparagas beds don't begin to produce enough to eat until the 3rd at the earliest.  Most hortoculturist will tell you to ignore them for the 1st two years other than breaking the stems and bending them over.  Year 3 you will start getting a meal or 2 of slender stalks and more each year there after.  Also never harvest every stem, leave a few at the end of the season and bend them over.
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« Reply #31 on: February 22, 2008, 09:51:04 AM »

Steve, I'm not quite getting it.  You say that you have a crop three years old, and you planted 20 crowns last year.  Elaborate a little bit more.  Did you plant the crowns at least 1 foot apart?  Pardon me, I am not trying to be an expert, but I want to see if I can help you.

These crowns that you planted last year, don't touch them for at least another 2 years, allow them to mature to provide food for you.

The crowns that you have had in for three years, now this year they should begin to produce some that you can eat, don't take them all.  Leave lots in the ground to grow up to produce next years crowns, which you should begin to harvest even more.

With asparagus you need to look at the big picture, years down the road.  No harvesting until after the third year, and then only a few.  The fourth year and forward they will provide food for the table.

Did you put lots of manure on compost on them?  They are heavy feeders, really heavy.  They love, and I mean love, to be fed, lots.......They like drainage, they like lots of moisture too at the same time.

So, friend, elaborate. I might be able to help you out a little bit, lean on me.  Have a wonderful and beautiful day, love our lives we live. Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
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« Reply #32 on: February 22, 2008, 08:37:28 PM »

Thanks Cindi, I planted 20 crowns three years ago and transplanted some wild crowns (clumps) last year. I think the manure and compost may be the problem. I gave the a little fertilizer last year and some ground maple leaves. Asparagus grows wild by the road. It seems to do pretty good on it's own, so that has been my guide. Plan A is not working so it is time for plan B.

Thanks again, Steve   
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« Reply #33 on: February 22, 2008, 09:16:01 PM »

Thanks Cindi, I planted 20 crowns three years ago and transplanted some wild crowns (clumps) last year. I think the manure and compost may be the problem. I gave the a little fertilizer last year and some ground maple leaves. Asparagus grows wild by the road. It seems to do pretty good on it's own, so that has been my guide. Plan A is not working so it is time for plan B.

Thanks again, Steve   

Steve, compost and manure are not the problem.  Is the bed in full sun?  Does it get a steady supply (but not too wet!) supply of moisture?  Is the soil neutral on the pH scale?  My bed was installed three years ago, this is going to be the year I am expecting a good harvest.  Since asparagus is in the lily family, I use a good organic bulb food on them (yes, I know they're not a bulb, but the rootstock is important on asparagus, the fertility needs are the same) and layer on four inches of well-composted manure right now, before anything comes up. 
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« Reply #34 on: February 23, 2008, 09:59:08 AM »

Thanks Cindi, I planted 20 crowns three years ago and transplanted some wild crowns (clumps) last year. I think the manure and compost may be the problem. I gave the a little fertilizer last year and some ground maple leaves. Asparagus grows wild by the road. It seems to do pretty good on it's own, so that has been my guide. Plan A is not working so it is time for plan B.

Thanks again, Steve   

Steve, compost and manure are not the problem.  Is the bed in full sun?  Does it get a steady supply (but not too wet!) supply of moisture?  Is the soil neutral on the pH scale?  My bed was installed three years ago, this is going to be the year I am expecting a good harvest.  Since asparagus is in the lily family, I use a good organic bulb food on them (yes, I know they're not a bulb, but the rootstock is important on asparagus, the fertility needs are the same) and layer on four inches of well-composted manure right now, before anything comes up. 

Steve, I agree with Ann about the manure and compost, they love that stuff!!!  Listen to her words, they are good and full of excellent knowledge.  Pile on the manure and compost too (if you have it).

Now Ann, a queery for you......you say a good ORGANIC bulb food, yep, organic is the best, of course, the only root/bulb food that I use is bonemeal (eeeks!!!  I hope that is considered organic), if it isn't, oh well, I am a firm believer in bonemeal....Ann, would you say that bonemeal is the same bulb food that you speak of?  I am kind of thinkin' so, bonemeal is for bulbs, trees, etc.  I didn't realize asparagus is in the lily family, so funny how so many plants are of the same line eh?  Have a wonderful and beautiful day, loving our great life.  Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
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« Reply #35 on: February 23, 2008, 10:50:57 AM »

I know I said organic, but I meant organically based.  I use Espoma Bulbtone on all of my bulb, rhizomes, and plants that have thick roots like peonies.  My garlic gets a good dose when it goes into the ground and I'll put some on soon again, as soon as the ground begins to thaw.  Bulbtone gives many nutrients besides the phosphorous and calcium bonemeal contains.  I've used many of the Espoma products, I really like their organic (yes, this time I mean truly organic) lawn food, it doesn't make the grass grow like crazy, just nice and green and thick.
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« Reply #36 on: February 23, 2008, 11:18:30 AM »

Ann, good, I have to go to the nursery today to get some sunshine mix to start seedlings, so I am going to see if we have this brand, Epsoma, not sure if it is here in Canada, haven't noticed it,but gonna check it out, talkin' to ya.  Have a wonderful, great day, Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
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« Reply #37 on: February 23, 2008, 12:52:22 PM »

thganx for me too. Now I have too find some horse manure. Looked on craigs list and found free pickup full w/ $10 loading fee. Like Understudy, I may be needing a truck soon.
How long must one age manure before it can be used?
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« Reply #38 on: February 23, 2008, 02:08:43 PM »

Well, if you get it now, how long is it til you start to plant?  Because if you've got six or eight weeks before that time, you can spread it out now, it'll mellow and age, and the rain/snow water will run any runoff into your soil.  If you're going to put it on actively growing garden areas you need to let it age for about three months or so.  Chicken manure is hotter, that's a good six to eight months in a compost pile before you can use it - sparingly!
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« Reply #39 on: February 23, 2008, 06:00:59 PM »

Rabbit manure is best  , you can put it right on the plant and will not burn .Do not use too much on blooming plants it will make them produce lots of foliage .
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« Reply #40 on: February 23, 2008, 06:03:27 PM »

Yep, rabbit manure is the best, unfortunately my source is gone, my nextdoor neighbor (the bee hating one) had bunnies for years and didn't mind if I took the manure, but her kids are grown now and no one is in 4H, so she's only got one left (second to the last one died this past winter).
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« Reply #41 on: February 23, 2008, 06:11:47 PM »

We are growing Cornflowers, Asters, various bulbs, and Blue berry bushes
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