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Author Topic: What are you Growing?  (Read 5385 times)
MrILoveTheAnts
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« on: February 03, 2008, 08:05:44 PM »

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v735/mrilovetheants/Plants/PlantShelf.jpg

I'm probably two weeks early for the aria but apparently 2 out of 3 groundhogs believe spring will be coming early. Punxsutawney Phil seems to think Global Warming is a myth. Though I don't have the land for most of these plants, as I've said in other threads, I'll be giving some to friends and relatives. Of all of the plants I'm trying to grow I'm going for at least 10 of each. So I planted a bunch maybe 3 days ago and expected it would take them 7 to 14 days for them to germinate, just as it read on each packet. Well about 1/3 of them have already started coming up so hopefully they can hold out until spring. This is the first year I'm doing this so hopefully I'll learn a lot about growing them. I've got plenty of pots to transplant them if they're really in need of space.

Onion
Cucumbers: My parents tell me I need to grow them on hills but I read they'll grow just as a tomato plant does when given a lattice.
Sage
Sweet Corn
Pepper (green)
Mallow (rose pink): Meant for butterflies but it's resemblance to Rose of Sharon annoys me.
Dahlia (dwarf mix): I'm not happy with the mixed color but at least they're small.
Canterbury Bells: A biannual, I guess that means they don't bloom until the second year? But does it live past that?
Lavender: A different type and shade of blue then what I've already grown, I really want to make a boarder of alternating blues.
Basil and Oregano: At some point I need to ask how these are harvested and used in cooking.
Watermelon (sugar baby): Very small watermelons, I look forward to trying them out.
Tomatoes (both Delicious, and Super Sweets): My dad always plants them with the annoying habit of not caring what's already planted in a space. So this year I said I'd take over.
Sunflowers (both Mexican, and Skyscraper) Mexican sunflowers look more like daises, but what surprises most people is that they're an 4 to 6 feet tall and around Annual. Basically an instant bush. Skyscraper grows 12 to 14 feet tall and hopefully doesn't fall over. I like the idea of looking up at the birds as they eat the seeds. Goldfinches in particular love them.
Cosmos (orange)
Convolvulus (Creeping Morning Glory): Honestly I hate creeping plants. This is an annual and I hope it never comes back after this year.
Coleus: Similar to a Hosta, but they're an annual with neat colored leaves. Basically the front garden gets almost no sunlight at all and everything we've planted there besides Hostas have died. Hopefully their flowers will be good for the bees.

So that's what I'm growing so far, and I'll likely get another flat of seeds growing. Now what are you growing? 
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Angi_H
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« Reply #1 on: February 04, 2008, 01:13:20 AM »

Ok here is my list. I am also a certified producer for Farmers Markets.

Heirloom tomatoes paste types, cherry types and Beef steak types. All different colors and all different types for a total of 20 varietys and 60 plants.

Heirloom Squashes about 5 varietys

Heirloom garlic and onions and shallots,

Heirloom Pumpkins and cantalopes and watermellons,

15 different herbs

Heirloom Asparagus

4 types of wine grapes and 3 reg  grapes

Varrigated pink lemon

Navel Oranges

Strawberries, Blueberries, razberries

Potatoes

Sunflowers, and lots and lots of clover and pollen and necter flowers for the bees. I have other veggies on plan just my mind went blank. Plus being a certified producer for the veggies and eggs. I will sale eggs Duck, Chicken< Quail and turkey eating eggs and hatching eggs as well as chicks and poults


Angi
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Cindi
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« Reply #2 on: February 04, 2008, 08:17:13 AM »

MrILoveTheAnts.  I will compile a list later of what I am planting, but I am going to comment on a couple that you are growing that you had queeries about.  You are doing excellent with the seed propogation.  Now it sure is fun, eh?  Good luck!!!!

<Cucumbers: My parents tell me I need to grow them on hills but I read they'll grow just as a tomato plant does when given a lattice.
I grow cucumbers on the ground, I don't bother with hills.  I also grow cucumbers up trellises, like chicken wire strung along, they grow up and then hang over the other side, it works and it a great space saver.

<Mallow (rose pink): Meant for butterflies but it's resemblance to Rose of Sharon annoys me.
I grow a species of mallow, it is called Lavatera, it is beautiful, it is like a plant that grows about 2 feet tall, covered in beautiful deep pink flower that look like a hybiscus, much more pretty than the mallow, which has a nice flower, but the lavatera flower is larger and very beautifully deep in size, it self-seeds around here, comes up everywhere.

<Canterbury Bells: A biannual, I guess that means they don't bloom until the second year? But does it live past that?
A bieannial flower does not bloom the first year, the second year it has beautiful flowers, then this plant dies.  It only lives for two seasons.  Quite often with biennials though, the mother plant will set seeds and that carries on the species.  This makes it appear like the mother plant never really dies.  Biennials are wonderful to have.  I have some and they have been here since I first planted them, over 15 years ago, they just keep going and going and going.

<Lavender: A different type and shade of blue then what I've already grown, I really want to make a boarder of alternating blues.
If you want some really pretty blue border plants, then think about Lobelia, Crystal Palace, an exciting colour of deep marine blue, cornflowers (dwarf) are pretty blue, ageratum, also comes in a pretty blue, good for borders.  Google blue border plants, you will be surprised how many shades of blues there are (purple is called blue too, so that can be confusing).

<Coleus: Similar to a Hosta, but they're an annual with neat colored leaves. Basically the front garden gets almost no sunlight at all and everything we've planted there besides Hostas have died. Hopefully their flowers will be good for the bees.
Coleus do well in shaded areas, yes, hostas do love that cooler, low light condition too.  If the hostas do well there, get some different cultivars, (or divide yours), they LOVE to be divided.  I began with about 6 of the Royal Standard many years ago, now I have tons of hosta clumps everywhere, trust me, they love division.  The Royal Standard (get that one if you can) has a beautiful white flower stalk that is EXTREMELY fragrant, smells alot like Gardenia, you would love it.
Have the best and most wonderful day, Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
Cindi
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« Reply #3 on: February 04, 2008, 08:19:35 AM »

Angi, you have got your hands full.  Being a certified organic grower would be in my mind, a great amount of work, I think that you are doing a wonderful job, takin' my hat off to you.  Have a wonderful and great day, Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
MrILoveTheAnts
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« Reply #4 on: February 04, 2008, 02:36:42 PM »

Thanks Cindi.

In my writing I completely forgot I had written a few on the back of the card too.

Blanket Flower: Can't wait for these to bloom, seems they also attract some birds too.
Zinnia: I have tons of these from god knows where.
and Poppies

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Kimbrell
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« Reply #5 on: February 04, 2008, 04:27:23 PM »

MrILOVETHEANTS
Have you ever considered ferns for your shady front garden?  I have a shade garden with one corner filled with different kinds and colors of ferns and forget me nots.  Easy to grow and they fill in a lot of space.

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mark
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« Reply #6 on: February 04, 2008, 05:05:45 PM »

OLD and TIRED!
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MrILoveTheAnts
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« Reply #7 on: February 04, 2008, 05:39:13 PM »

Angi_H: How do you keep Heirloom verities of Pumpkins? I understand they can crossbreed with things like squash, have you ever had this as a problem?
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Kimbrell
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« Reply #8 on: February 04, 2008, 10:14:59 PM »

Mark,
Ferns and forget me nots may be old and tired.  But  it pleases me to have them in my garden and I think that's all that matters.
Maybe you have some suggestions for something new and exciting to fill a shady spot?
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Understudy
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« Reply #9 on: February 04, 2008, 10:25:35 PM »

I am real good with weeds.

My wife on the other hand:
Mustard greens.
Heirloom purple cherokee tomatos
Cherry tomatos
Carrots
Peppers
String beans
Eggplant
and more stuff that she will try to sneak into my plate.

Sincerely,
Brendhan

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Brian D. Bray
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« Reply #10 on: February 04, 2008, 11:17:51 PM »

Brendhan, glad you added an s on weed.  It's illegal otherwise.

I'm growing decrepit, short tempered (in my old age), and totally involved with the birds (pigeons & chickens) and the bees.
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Life is a school.  What have you learned?   Brian      The greatest danger to our society is apathy, vote in every election!
Cindi
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« Reply #11 on: February 05, 2008, 09:10:47 AM »

MrILoveTheAnts.   Blanket flower, aka, Gaillardia.  A perennial.  Yes, the bees love it!!!!!  Hold on, gonna go grab a picture.



And this is the picture of one of my borders that has Crystal Palace Lobelia, and bees love it too.



Have a wonderful and great day, Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
mark
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« Reply #12 on: February 05, 2008, 04:50:53 PM »

kimbrell    sorry, little misunderstanding here.....
question was what are you growing?
 i am growing old and tired....   bad shorthand i guess embarassed
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Kimbrell
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« Reply #13 on: February 05, 2008, 10:17:13 PM »

No problem, Mark.  So what ARE you growing?  After seeing Cindi's beautiful pictures, I want anything that's in her garden!
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KONASDAD
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« Reply #14 on: February 07, 2008, 10:22:17 AM »

For those shady area I just love Cardinal Flower(lobelia cardinalis). Hummingbirds and bumbles love it, too long a flower for bees though. Butterflies like it too. Anything from the primulas family and of course Lily of the valley for shade. Haven't decdided my veggie yets, but will be doing lots of onions, garlic, and of course tomatoes galore! Cucumbers do very well here too. Get hundreds from about six vines. Pumkin didn't do so well last year and the vine was huge. Need more room for them than I gave them. Want to put grapes in too. So many desires, so few dollars!
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Bennettoid
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« Reply #15 on: February 08, 2008, 03:30:58 PM »

I'm not even close to planning what I'm going to plant yet.

On the bright side, I've got a couple of HUGE compost piles that will be ready in a month!
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asprince
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« Reply #16 on: February 08, 2008, 07:16:19 PM »

As soon as the ground dries a little, I will be planting my potatoes, broccoli, and cabbage. Cleaned up my asparagus bed today, awaiting sprouts.

Steve 
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Cindi
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« Reply #17 on: February 09, 2008, 10:27:20 AM »

Steve, ah, the asparagus shoots, I can't wait.  Ours don't show their pretty little heads until about the 3rd week of April.  Maybe this year they will even be a little later, but yep, yep, spring time is a'comin'.  Have a beautiful day on this great earth we share.  Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
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« Reply #18 on: February 11, 2008, 11:10:20 AM »

I recovered about 10 asparagus plants this fasll and trans[planted them. I hope I get a crop! Never had asparagus before but love them. Good for your kidneys!
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Brian D. Bray
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« Reply #19 on: February 12, 2008, 03:34:32 AM »

I recovered about 10 asparagus plants this fasll and trans[planted them. I hope I get a crop! Never had asparagus before but love them. Good for your kidneys!

Hope you planted them deep with lots of cow compost.
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Life is a school.  What have you learned?   Brian      The greatest danger to our society is apathy, vote in every election!
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