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Author Topic: Varroa and flowers  (Read 4073 times)

Offline pauvil

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Varroa and flowers
« on: February 01, 2008, 02:37:20 PM »
I'm wondering, in my reading on mite treatment it seems that, and maybe I'm way off, that the main ingrediant found in a Apistan is Fluvalinate, a synthetic form of Pyrethrum called Pyrethroid. The natural form which is found in some species of the Chrysanthemum. These flowers have been known as beeing natural insecticides. Maybee it's a crazy idea, but I wonder how a nice patch of the flowers would work as natural mite control. Regardless, I will be planting some around my hives.
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Offline Understudy

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Re: Varroa and flowers
« Reply #1 on: February 01, 2008, 02:54:48 PM »
This is a wonderful question. Someone at the fair asked me and I didn't have an answer for. I am very curious also if you could have certain plants that would help repel Varroa and small hive beetles?

Sincerely,
Brendhan

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Offline pauvil

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Re: Varroa and flowers
« Reply #2 on: February 01, 2008, 03:05:47 PM »
It can't hurt to try I don't think, I know that if you look up certain Chrysanthemums like the Dalmation and Persian that they are well known natural insecticides. I guess you dry the flowers and use the powder for pests. What if our bees use these same flowers?? I'm trying it no matter what, I don't think it will hurt the bees, any known flowers that do??

Offline Michael Bush

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Re: Varroa and flowers
« Reply #3 on: February 01, 2008, 08:31:15 PM »
>Maybee it's a crazy idea, but I wonder how a nice patch of the flowers would work as natural mite control.

How would the mites come in contact with the flowers?
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Offline Understudy

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Re: Varroa and flowers
« Reply #4 on: February 01, 2008, 10:40:08 PM »
Maybe the natural aroma of the flowers is repellent to the pests?

Sincerely,
Brendhan

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Offline pauvil

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Re: Varroa and flowers
« Reply #5 on: February 04, 2008, 10:07:44 AM »
don't bees crawl on them?

Offline bassman1977

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Re: Varroa and flowers
« Reply #6 on: February 04, 2008, 01:36:58 PM »
I am trying to find the thread, but some guy posted on here a few months ago that he was living in an one area and he had a mite issue, then moved and the mite issue went away.  Upon further investigation found that there was a lot of mint (I don't recall if it was peppermint, spearmint, etc.) in the medians along the highway he lived close to.  He was thinking that it could very well have something to do with the lowered mite count he was experiencing.  Obviously there are plenty of factors that could go into something like that, but it sounds good. 

If I can dig up that thread, I'll post it.
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Offline DayValleyDahlias

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Re: Varroa and flowers
« Reply #7 on: February 04, 2008, 01:48:03 PM »
Bees LOVE mint especially spearmint which can be invasive..that's okay with me. I plan to planting it in a area where it's invasiveness won't matter...what a great idea...I can envision the bees crawling all over the mint, picking up the oils on their lil bodies, and PERHAPS repelling the mites...I am going t plant lots of thyme as well...

Offline pauvil

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Re: Varroa and flowers
« Reply #8 on: February 04, 2008, 02:04:16 PM »
Those are the lines I've been thinking along.....

Offline Scadsobees

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Re: Varroa and flowers
« Reply #9 on: February 04, 2008, 02:50:20 PM »
All they touch is the flowers, and often only touch that with their toungue.  If they are crawling on it then it is probably because they have deformed wing virus or tracheal mites :roll: and by then it is too late.

Now an idea that might work better (though I don't recommend it) is picking the plants and sticking them in the hive.  Mint wouldn't hurt, but I'm not so sure about chrysanthamums (which I think have the pyrethroids or whatever in them).

Rick
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Offline DayValleyDahlias

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Re: Varroa and flowers
« Reply #10 on: February 04, 2008, 06:40:30 PM »
It couldn't hurt...and it seems pro-active...and pretty too!

Offline bassman1977

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Re: Varroa and flowers
« Reply #11 on: February 04, 2008, 09:14:07 PM »
Quote
All they touch is the flowers, and often only touch that with their toungue.  If they are crawling on it then it is probably because they have deformed wing virus or tracheal mites  and by then it is too late.

I observe bees all the time crawling and touching flowers.  There wings are fine and they have never shown tracheal mite evidence. 



Quote
Now an idea that might work better (though I don't recommend it) is picking the plants and sticking them in the hive.

I would tend to agree.  I think if you put it in there loose, they'll just take it out as garbage anyway.
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Offline Brian D. Bray

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Re: Varroa and flowers
« Reply #12 on: February 05, 2008, 12:38:35 AM »
I am trying to find the thread, but some guy posted on here a few months ago that he was living in an one area and he had a mite issue, then moved and the mite issue went away.  Upon further investigation found that there was a lot of mint (I don't recall if it was peppermint, spearmint, etc.) in the medians along the highway he lived close to.  He was thinking that it could very well have something to do with the lowered mite count he was experiencing.  Obviously there are plenty of factors that could go into something like that, but it sounds good. 

If I can dig up that thread, I'll post it.

maybe that's why I have few mite problems my 1.25 acres is covered with several types of mint.  the bees work it well.  If nothing else it keeps the trachies down.
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Offline heartofthehive.com

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Re: Varroa and flowers
« Reply #13 on: March 28, 2008, 06:38:36 PM »
Definitely don't use chrysanthemums in the hive. We have a house in Florida, and mosquitoes are a big problem them, and prevent you from enjoying your pool in the evening. Most people put their pools in a mesh screen enclosure. We opted to leave the pool uncovered, and use a bug-spraying system around the perimeter of the pool/lanai. The spray used is chrysanthemum juice. It is 100% effective in keeping mosquitoes and other flying bugs out of the enclosed area. I can't say I had seen bees there before then, but there certainly aren't any now. We were severly limited in what we could use because it is an Auduban Community (you can't use anything that would hurt the birds).

Alexis

Offline taipantoo

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Re: Varroa and flowers
« Reply #14 on: March 29, 2008, 08:19:07 AM »
Maybe the natural aroma of the flowers is repellent to the pests?

I believe I read that years ago in an organic gardening article.
Somebody wrote in that they wanted to plant pyrethrun Chrysanthemums in their garden.
The response was that pyrethrum was also an insect repellent and that would keep the bees away.

I think first that I would plant some amongst other flowers in an out of the way area away from the hives and observe whether or not the bees came to the flowers or stay away all together.
They may not like it close to the hive.