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Author Topic: I have an opportunity to buy a couple of hives. Question  (Read 1697 times)
Blackbird
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Location: Santa Cruz, California USA


« on: September 21, 2004, 01:22:51 PM »

I know this isn't the best time to aquire a hive since we are going into winter but I have this opportunity.
I was wondering how to evaluate the hives and how much I should pay for them?
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golfpsycho
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Location: salt lake city


« Reply #1 on: September 21, 2004, 01:39:44 PM »

I was following a similar thread on Beesource.  As with any time you purchase bees, you should inspect for disease.  Doesn't do you much good to purchase bees that can't overwinter.  The woodenware is used and the price should reflect that.  Also, you should be getting a lower price because you will be doing the medicating, feeding, etc to overwinter them.  Colonys in the spring would get a higher price, because they have the promise of a crop in front of you.  They settled on a fairly wide price range anywhere from 80 to 130 dollars, depending on the condition of the equipment and bees, and the motivation of the seller.  I will add that several posters were amazed by the low price, but it was reiterated, you will have to overwinter them successfully to realize their full value.  If the seller doesn't agree, you can always advise them that after THEY successfully overwinter the bees, you would be happy to negotiate a higher price.  Your winter in Santa Cruz may be fairly mild, so there might not be much feeding to be done.  However, if they need medicating, and don't get it, they will be just as dead.
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Blackbird
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« Reply #2 on: September 21, 2004, 11:37:15 PM »

Thanks.
That's about the range I was thinking so that's good.
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Beth Kirkley
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« Reply #3 on: September 21, 2004, 11:37:55 PM »

I don't see $80 as too low a price. I could start a hive for less than that in the spring, AND would be having a better start - by building my own hives and buying a 2 pound package with queen.
Golf gave good things to look for though - look at the wooden ware, look at the health, and look at their stores for winter. About the only bonus you get by buying an established hive this late in the year is that they'll jump up in population in the early spring and should give you honey that year. A new hive started in the spring won't have much honey surplus in the first year.

Beth
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golfpsycho
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« Reply #4 on: September 23, 2004, 09:49:14 PM »

A harvestable crop the first year, standard woodenware, healthy bees.  80 bucks?  Sounds like a pretty good deal to me.
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Blackbird
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« Reply #5 on: September 24, 2004, 03:35:59 PM »

the person who is helping me get these actually wants to buy them for less than $80.
I'll let you know what we end up paying.
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