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Author Topic: Average pounds per hive with crush and strain?  (Read 1271 times)
twb
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« on: January 20, 2008, 02:48:27 PM »

So how many pounds of honey per hive is average when using the crush and strain method of harvest?  I have been reading all I can find on this subject in the last 2 weeks and am considering trying it for a couple of years while I wait for a used extractor to come for sale.  It sounds good from those who find it works well, but the bad luck stories of things like collapsed comb from going foundationless sound a bit too exciting Undecided.  I also would not want to miss out on the goldenrod flow since many customers like that honey the best so far.  But I may miss it if bees do not redraw the comb after the first harvest, right?
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"Pleasant words are a honeycomb, sweet to the soul and healing to the bones."  Proverbs 16:24

Sincerely,
TWB
randydrivesabus
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« Reply #1 on: January 20, 2008, 03:24:38 PM »

so it sounds like you are going to be using one super for honey at a time. i got about 35lbs from a medium super that i harvested in early to mid july. i crushed and strained then put the empty frames and medium super on another hive. it was full of frames of capped honey by the end of the flow (first hard freeze).
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twb
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« Reply #2 on: January 20, 2008, 04:33:41 PM »

so it sounds like you are going to be using one super for honey at a time.


I will use whatever gets me the most honey and still allows the use of starter strips with no foundation.  Even harvesting one or two frames at a time is an option if that works best.  Although I did learn not to brush bees wrong while holding the frame with bare hands last season shocked Wink

It is encouraging that you got 35 pounds at first harvest and another 35 or so later.  Why did you put that super on a different hive as opposed to the same one from which you took it?
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"Pleasant words are a honeycomb, sweet to the soul and healing to the bones."  Proverbs 16:24

Sincerely,
TWB
randydrivesabus
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« Reply #3 on: January 20, 2008, 05:12:42 PM »

so it sounds like you are going to be using one super for honey at a time.


I will use whatever gets me the most honey and still allows the use of starter strips with no foundation.  Even harvesting one or two frames at a time is an option if that works best.  Although I did learn not to brush bees wrong while holding the frame with bare hands last season shocked Wink

It is encouraging that you got 35 pounds at first harvest and another 35 or so later.  Why did you put that super on a different hive as opposed to the same one from which you took it?
i put a different super on the first hive and harvested that one too. i've been using nitrile gloves when i think its a bit risky or i'm going to be spending a lot of time. stealing honey is risky.
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #4 on: January 20, 2008, 05:55:52 PM »

In at typical year I get somewhere between -100 and +200 pounds of honey per hive regardless of the method of harvest.
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Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
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"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
twb
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« Reply #5 on: January 21, 2008, 07:53:52 PM »

In at typical year I get somewhere between -100 and +200 pounds of honey per hive regardless of the method of harvest.


I was about to respond with incredulity but then I noticed the minus sign and started laughing instead.  Good one. 

When supering with foundationless for crush and strain is it important to place the new super under the filled/uncapped one (ie bottom super)?

Do you find you must often start the next super by placing it between two brood boxes for a bit to get them going on the comb? 
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"Pleasant words are a honeycomb, sweet to the soul and healing to the bones."  Proverbs 16:24

Sincerely,
TWB
Michael Bush
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« Reply #6 on: January 21, 2008, 09:23:45 PM »

>I was about to respond with incredulity but then I noticed the minus sign and started laughing instead.  Good one.

Some years you feed 100 pounds of sugar and harvest nothing...

>When supering with foundationless for crush and strain is it important to place the new super under the filled/uncapped one (ie bottom super)?

No.


>Do you find you must often start the next super by placing it between two brood boxes for a bit to get them going on the comb?

No.  I just stack them on top.  A drawn comb or a frame of foundation in the middle of the box is helpful both to ladder them up to the super and to get them started in the right direction.

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Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
-------------------
"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
twb
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« Reply #7 on: January 22, 2008, 05:11:25 PM »

I just stack them on top.  A drawn comb or a frame of foundation in the middle of the box is helpful both to ladder them up to the super and to get them started in the right direction.



Great, thanks.  That sounds so easy compared to the troubles some people seem to have with getting foundationless frames drawn out.  I look forward to giving it a try.
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"Pleasant words are a honeycomb, sweet to the soul and healing to the bones."  Proverbs 16:24

Sincerely,
TWB
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