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Author Topic: OK to use Linseed oil on hive bodies?  (Read 1648 times)
twb
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Location: Southwest Michigan


« on: December 31, 2007, 04:46:09 PM »

Up to this point all the woodenware I have purchased has been "hot dipped".  Now I have a nuc hive body that came from somewhere that does not have the "hot dip" service.  I like the wood look and wonder if linseed oil is ok to use.  It seems like it will be a pain to apply several coats and rub it in each time but if it only needs to be done once every 5 or 6 years that would be ok.  I am sure there are several options but the linseed oil is free so I am being cheap, too. Smiley
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"Pleasant words are a honeycomb, sweet to the soul and healing to the bones."  Proverbs 16:24

Sincerely,
TWB
Kirk-o
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« Reply #1 on: December 31, 2007, 07:53:59 PM »

There iis two kinds od Linseed oil were I come from Boiled and Raw .Raw  will take a very long time to dry.I wouldn't use boiled either.I would opt to paint.

Note rags or drop cloths will combust I'm speaking from experience.
kirk The house painter
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shawnwri
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« Reply #2 on: December 31, 2007, 10:45:02 PM »

I've heard linseed oil is susceptible to mildew
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twb
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« Reply #3 on: January 01, 2008, 09:21:19 AM »

Thanks to your responses I did a bit of research and found that linseed is subject to mildew and that it alone does not give UV protection from the sun.  So, thanks.  It sounds like you saved me some work and some problems.  I will start mixing some paint or something.
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"Pleasant words are a honeycomb, sweet to the soul and healing to the bones."  Proverbs 16:24

Sincerely,
TWB
fcderosa
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« Reply #4 on: January 01, 2008, 09:23:02 AM »

If you like the wood look why not use a polyurathane varnish.  None of my supers are painted but varnished instead.  Doesn't seem to effect anything. Smiley
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Zoot
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« Reply #5 on: January 01, 2008, 01:46:48 PM »

All finishes with organic elements like linseed oil will develope mildew eventually. The newer generation of polyuerethanes probably a better choice for the "varnished" look. I prefer a product called Sikkens for exterior wood treatments of any kind due to it's U.V. defeating properties. It's expensive but it's longevity has no equal. Some parts of my house exterior, all of whci is western red cedar, look as good as when it was applied 10 years ago.
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