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Author Topic: brugmansia,etc....  (Read 1723 times)
Cindi
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« on: December 22, 2007, 12:16:41 PM »

Ann, and I thought that I was an observant person.  I looked at the picture two times before I noticed the brugmansia in the picture, I was focused on looking at the bees.  Of course, now that you have pointed it out, it can be clearly seen.  Good for you, it is indeed a beauty of a flower, yea!!!!  Wouldn't have noticed it had you not been my eyes.  Have a beautiful, great day, dear gardening girl, I have lots to learn about observation for sure.  Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
reinbeau
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« Reply #1 on: December 22, 2007, 04:20:15 PM »

Can you imagine the scent in the evening, Cindi?  Heavenly!
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- Ann, A Gardening Beek -  ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ

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Cindi
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« Reply #2 on: December 22, 2007, 11:48:54 PM »

Ann, OK my dear girl.  Now you are really getting me excited about the promise of the summer and its evening fragrance with so many flowers we grow!!!!!.  Datura, bragmansia, whatever we will call it, is on my wish list for propogation and cultivation this year.  Going to get the seeds set after the new year and see where we go. Remember I told you I grew datura many years ago? Well, from that experience I know I can propogate it and have it flower the same year, but I need to set my mind back into some research about the cultivation of datura.  Oooohweeee, summertime is coming!!!  The long dog days of summer.  Beautiful day, beautiful life.  Cindi

Rats!!!  By the way, I tried my darndest to grow that Moonflower vine we were all talking about last spring.  I recall posts about the intoxicating evening fragrance.  Zoot was the one that had me really excited about this night fragrance.  Do you think that I could get it to grow even more than one foot long.  I have the greenest of thumbs, but when it came to this species, forget it, doing something really, really wrong.  Eeeks!!!!
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
reinbeau
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« Reply #3 on: December 23, 2007, 08:41:25 AM »

Ann, OK my dear girl.  Now you are really getting me excited about the promise of the summer and its evening fragrance with so many flowers we grow!!!!!.  Datura, bragmansia, whatever we will call it, is on my wish list for propogation and cultivation this year.  Going to get the seeds set after the new year and see where we go. Remember I told you I grew datura many years ago? Well, from that experience I know I can propogate it and have it flower the same year, but I need to set my mind back into some research about the cultivation of datura.  Oooohweeee, summertime is coming!!!  The long dog days of summer.  Beautiful day, beautiful life.  Cindi
Datura flowers point up, brugmansias hang down.  Daturas are fairly easy from seed, they just take a long time to flower - you should be able to overwinter them with no problem, they're hardy here with protection in zone 6a.  You can tell the overwintered ones, they send up lots of shoots from the roots, seedlings are one stem. 

Quote
Rats!!!  By the way, I tried my darndest to grow that Moonflower vine we were all talking about last spring.  I recall posts about the intoxicating evening fragrance.  Zoot was the one that had me really excited about this night fragrance.  Do you think that I could get it to grow even more than one foot long.  I have the greenest of thumbs, but when it came to this species, forget it, doing something really, really wrong.  Eeeks!!!!
I had the moonflower vine, Ipomoea alba, also, but it didn't flower.  They're buggers sometimes!
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- Ann, A Gardening Beek -  ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ

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Cindi
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« Reply #4 on: December 23, 2007, 08:48:27 AM »

OK Ann, tell me, what is your favourite, datura or brugmansia?  Tell me your tale, I am interested.  I remember that picture that you took and put on the forum of the white flowers shining in the evening.  What that the datura?  Which do you find more fragrant?  You know me, I am after fragrance.  I need to know what cultivar of these to begin to propogate, (is there any that you find especially attractive?).  I will be needing to order seed soon.

It was a very disappointing year for the Matthiola Bicornis (Evening scented stock) that I grow everywhere.  It must have been because of the lack of the sun rays for a good part of the summer.  Generally, on summer's evenings, the moment that the sun goes down, this intoxicating fragrance (I love that word) permeates the air.  I rarely smelled the scent from the flowers this past season, lots and lots of the pretty mauve flowers, but hardly a scent.  I plant them on my bedroom patio and their heady fragrance always drifts through my bedroom patio doors and windows all night long, makes the most aromatic room in the house.  But it just was not there last year, such an enormous disappointment.  Even the nicotiannas' (which I plant en masse and the bees love) night fragrances were barely noticeable.  Never have I experienced this before with either of these species.  It was a bummer.  Oh well, there is always next year.
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
reinbeau
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« Reply #5 on: December 23, 2007, 06:29:09 PM »

OK Ann, tell me, what is your favourite, datura or brugmansia?  Tell me your tale, I am interested.  I remember that picture that you took and put on the forum of the white flowers shining in the evening.  What that the datura?  Which do you find more fragrant?  You know me, I am after fragrance.  I need to know what cultivar of these to begin to propogate, (is there any that you find especially attractive?).  I will be needing to order seed soon.

Yes, those white ones were daturas.  For me, daturas are fairly easy to grow.  They have a lovely night fragrance and the bees really seem to enjoy them, just at dusk, even well after sundown, which I think is a riot.  They needed headlamps to find their way back to the hive.  cheesy  I grow the brugs in pots, so they're right on the patio outside the kitchen door, and their scent will knock your socks off!  But the blooms are fewer than from a plant in the ground (like the one in the photo above) so I guess I'll have to vote for the daturas.

Quote
It was a very disappointing year for the Matthiola Bicornis (Evening scented stock) that I grow everywhere.  It must have been because of the lack of the sun rays for a good part of the summer.  Generally, on summer's evenings, the moment that the sun goes down, this intoxicating fragrance (I love that word) permeates the air.  I rarely smelled the scent from the flowers this past season, lots and lots of the pretty mauve flowers, but hardly a scent.  I plant them on my bedroom patio and their heady fragrance always drifts through my bedroom patio doors and windows all night long, makes the most aromatic room in the house.  But it just was not there last year, such an enormous disappointment.  Even the nicotiannas' (which I plant en masse and the bees love) night fragrances were barely noticeable.  Never have I experienced this before with either of these species.  It was a bummer.  Oh well, there is always next year.
I have never had good luck with stocks, I don't think they like our climate around here.  Nicotianas grow well for me, their scent patterns are strange, though.  Some evenings they smelled wonderful, others I could barely notice it.  I stick with the species Nicotianas, the hybrid ones they grow for color don't seem to have any fragrance at all.
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- Ann, A Gardening Beek -  ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ

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Cindi
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« Reply #6 on: December 24, 2007, 08:08:30 AM »

Ann, yes, species Nicotianna for sure, hybrids are lousy for scent.  Stocks like cool weather, that is why we can grow them so easily here.  I really like the Dwarf 10 week mixture of stock, it is a hybrid (of course), but still beautiful for cut flower and extreme scent.  Daturas coming on here.  Beautiful day, great life.  Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
Cindi
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Location: Grindrod, B.C. Canada


« Reply #7 on: December 24, 2007, 09:30:10 AM »

Ann, right forgot to mention this.  You said that you put Brugmansia in pots, (of course so you can move them to the favourite sitting spot at night to enjoy the night fragrance, hee, hee,  Wink Smiley), but they don't bloom as well in pots.  Does Brugmansia have deep deep roots, maybe tap roots, that if they come in contact with a hinderance, like the bottom of a pot, they become stunted?  Have you ever looked into this?  I would be curious.  I find alot of large plants that grow in pots just don't do well as the ones in the open ground.  No doubt, some kind of root bound issues.

Wonder (I am going to probably bite that bullet and buy some Brugmansia tubers, (corms, whatever, do you know what they are?) and get them going here.  I don't know if I can yet grow these by seed.  I will grow them in really deep pots, depending on what your answer to my queeries are.  Maybe in enormous pots they will be good growers, time will tell that tale. Anyways, sweet dreams about the beauties of the summertime that we know are just around the corner.  Have a great and wonderful day, Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
reinbeau
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« Reply #8 on: December 24, 2007, 04:46:18 PM »

Brugs are usually grown from cuttings.  I've seen many potted brugs that bloom their brains out, but they are big pots, three feet high by at least that wide, I'd say.  They really are sub-trees so they need lots of space.  Where our growing season isn't all that long you can keep them a bit smaller.  Here what you can do is let them go completely dormant, only enough water to barely keep the soil moist once a week or so, and temps in the 40's right through February....then you cut them back and start fertilizing them and get them into warmth and unlight, they come right back.  You could probably overwinter them a bit gentler than that!  Smiley
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- Ann, A Gardening Beek -  ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ

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