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Author Topic: Best way to paint (treat) your hive  (Read 1705 times)

Offline Brian D. Bray

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Best way to paint (treat) your hive
« on: December 04, 2007, 12:07:51 AM »
I ask this question as I just spent the afternoon staining a bunch of fencing material and decided to use the left over stain to weather treat my unmade supers.  This is not about whether you should paint verses not painting.  I believe that painting, staining, or dipping adds several years of usable life to each box. 

I like to paint mine before I nail them together.  I lay them out on 2X4s stretched between 2 sawhorses.  I then lay the sides and ends of the supers hand cut up abutting each other.  Then using a roller it takes about three passes to paint all the box end and sides.  After they dry I use a pipe clamp to set all the ends and sides together so I can paint the end of each board.  Using 2 10 foot 2X4s and 4 sawhorses I can paint about 8 hive bodies in 5 minutes and that includes dealing the panels into place.

It might go faster if I used a sprayer but I have asthma and get short of breath when using a filter over my nose.
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Online kathyp

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Re: Best way to paint (treat) your hive
« Reply #1 on: December 04, 2007, 12:41:19 AM »
i put mine together.  then i get a big brush and slop paint all over the outside.  then i let it dry.  sometimes i miss a spot.
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Offline Robo

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Re: Best way to paint (treat) your hive
« Reply #2 on: December 04, 2007, 08:42:21 AM »
I thread a rope thru the stack of supers and then tie the rope between 2 trees and spread the supers apart.  That way I can paint all sides AND the top and bottom lips (which you can't do if stacked).  Then I just shoot them up with an air sprayer.  Spraying is the only way I have found to paint polystyrene hives.   There are so many mold marks it takes for every if trying to paint with a brush.
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Offline Hopeful

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Re: Best way to paint (treat) your hive
« Reply #3 on: December 04, 2007, 09:06:19 AM »
Robo,

What is the advantage of paintng a polystyrene hive? So far, we have painted a gallon's worth of woodenware and have used KathyP's method. It has been easy for me. My kids want Xmas money so I pay them to paint the stuff. Also, it is a job my 13yo autistic daughter can do well. She painted a dozen covers and a dozen candy board boxes the other day. She made $10, was covered in beige house paint and wore a big smile. I am considering making her a partner..... :)
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Offline Robo

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Re: Best way to paint (treat) your hive
« Reply #4 on: December 04, 2007, 10:24:25 AM »
Robo,

What is the advantage of paintng a polystyrene hive?
UV protection so they don't become brittle and start to break down.
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Offline Cindi

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Re: Best way to paint (treat) your hive
« Reply #5 on: December 04, 2007, 10:29:36 AM »
Rob, well, I think the Hokey Pokey is what it is all about.

I am curious, why did you begin to use the polystyrene boxes?  How many do you keep at your place?  (Is this something that you have already spoken about?  Maybe I missed out on that understanding, I can tend to miss things).  I think that I am curious mostly about the weight of them compared to wooden boxes.  If they are light weight, is there a fear that they may get blown away one day by strong winds?  Can you elaborate a little on them when you have some time?  Have a great and wonderful day.  Cindi
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Offline randydrivesabus

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Re: Best way to paint (treat) your hive
« Reply #6 on: December 04, 2007, 02:38:08 PM »
my wife paints my hives. she is very afraid of bees but loves honey and loves the idea of me expanding my beekeeping, so she is willing to help where she can. she also wants to get into beeswax candlemaking.

Offline Robo

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Re: Best way to paint (treat) your hive
« Reply #7 on: December 04, 2007, 02:54:13 PM »
Rob, well, I think the Hokey Pokey is what it is all about.

I am curious, why did you begin to use the polystyrene boxes?  How many do you keep at your place?  (Is this something that you have already spoken about?  Maybe I missed out on that understanding, I can tend to miss things).  I think that I am curious mostly about the weight of them compared to wooden boxes.  If they are light weight, is there a fear that they may get blown away one day by strong winds?  Can you elaborate a little on them when you have some time?  Have a great and wonderful day.  Cindi

I started using them this past Spring, so I have no winter experience yet.  I decided to give them a try based on Finsky's recommendation.  I have 7 hives and 2 double nucs in them.   Yes they are lighter in weight, but I have also switched these hives to HSC which is much heavier that wooden/wax frames.   So all in all I think they are actually heavier.  So far I have been pretty happy with them.  I like the frame rests because they leave a bee space below the tab, so no more smooshing bees.  I was a liitle concerned about how they would hold up, but so far they seem pretty tough.
"Opportunity is missed by most people because it comes dressed in overalls and looks like work." - Thomas Edison