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Author Topic: Goldenrod honey...fit for human consumption?  (Read 3658 times)
saltheart
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Location: Norfolk, Massachusetts


« on: August 24, 2004, 09:46:42 AM »

This being our first year with bees, this question might seem silly to some, but I've seen this comment posted elsewhere on the web...

Is goldenrod honey fit for human comsumption? Does it stink? Does this 'essence' occur only when the bees are 'drying' the honey? Is honey made at this time of year when the goldenrod blossoms good, or no good? Or is it purely personal taste?

We haven't started to harvest yet, but we will quite soon. The bees are still drawing out and filling comb in the supers, and we're fairly certain that, as there are many, many acres of river flats nearby, now covered with blossoming goldenrod, the nectar being stored in the upper supers is coming from the goldenrod...along with whatever else they find out there.

It never crossed our minds that some flowering plants might produce honey not fit for consumption. Earlier this year we went through much discussion about the varying theories on honey from rhododendrons that may or may not be toxic...general feeling is that it's not a major issue.

Now we read here and there that some folks out there are 'claiming' that honey from goldenrod is 'unfit' for human consumption. I find that to be a bit of a stretch, and perhaps just personal opinion.

So...what do you know about the subject?

Thanks.
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golfpsycho
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« Reply #1 on: August 24, 2004, 10:12:02 AM »

Goldenrod honey is fine.  It's a bit pungent when they are ripening it, but there is nothing wrong with it, although it tends to granulate a little quicker.  It's pretty strong, if you know what I mean.   Like clover and sage are mild, goldenrod is strong.  Some people don't like it, just like some people prefer strong dark beer, while others prefer pale amber beer.  Me.. I'm not so picky... I like beer.. and honey, although not at the same time.   hehehehehe
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Sting
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« Reply #2 on: August 24, 2004, 11:04:44 AM »

I've never heard of a honey being unfit for human consumption based on the source of the nectar.  As Golfpsycho says, each flower source imparts its own particular characteristics to the resulting honey with respect to colour, aroma and flavour, as well as other qualities such as the speed at which the given honey will granulate. From my experience, the lightest honey is from rapeseed (otherwise known as Canola).  It is almost as clear as water, is very mild tasting and is used to lighten other honeys.  The darkest of course is the almost black honey from buckwheat which is so strong-tasting that some people dislike it.  I, for one, like its molasses-like character, especially warmed and served over waffles or pancakes! Mmmmm.  There is nothing wrong with goldenrod honey.
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leominsterbeeman
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« Reply #3 on: August 24, 2004, 01:53:51 PM »

Golden Rod is a darker, quicker to granualte honey,   think of it as being full bodied.   It is a good addition to a wildflower mix of honey.... Up to personal taste.
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Anonymous
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« Reply #4 on: August 24, 2004, 11:39:30 PM »

As the other responders have already stated, goldenrod honey is a darker, more full bodied honey that I think is the best for cooking purposes as the flavor definitely adds to whatever recipe you put it in. I also love it on my morning cereal.
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TJ
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« Reply #5 on: August 26, 2004, 12:48:13 PM »

Gosh, I sure hope Goldenrod honey is at least pallitable. I'm counting on it as my honey crop this year. My hives have just gotten to the point where they have enough for the winter and anything that might be available for me has to be brought in starting now. My bees are in a sea of goldenrod, so I will aquire a taste for it. I have no choice.
TJ[/quote]
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wanabee
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« Reply #6 on: September 12, 2004, 09:27:44 AM »

I think golden rod honey is excellent. it granulates in the jar in a month or so. It is yellow in color. You can always warm it up to liquify it again. If you put it in a wide mouth jar, when it granulates It is great to spread on toast. peopple around here in upstate ny like it because they say it helps their allergys when they eat it.
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justgojumpit
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« Reply #7 on: October 21, 2004, 08:34:31 PM »

i just harvested about 10 lbs of goldenrod honey from my hives - very strong.  i swallowed a big mouthful, which burned my throat a bit, but i very much enjoyed it in smaller quantities.  this would be very good in tea and recipies, or spread thinly on toast... just be careful eating it straight Wink

justgojumpit
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Beth Kirkley
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« Reply #8 on: October 21, 2004, 10:41:28 PM »

Hey-
This post really got me thinking. Last year (at this time I think, or atleast with this time of years honey) we harvested and had honey that was very strong tasting. It also, to my big surprize, gave us one quart that was crystalized (looking creamed). My husband hated the taste, and said the whole house stunk of it. I personally loved it, and wished that other honey we've gotten tasted that good. He said at the time that he believed it was from pollen getting mixed into the honey. I really didn't think then (or think now) that there was any more pollen in that batch than others - which is little. But he insists it was a very cloudy batch, and that the "smell" had to have been from pollen.
I'm really wondering now if it was goldenrod honey. I can't remember for sure the color, whether dark or light, but I think it was darker.

And here after a year and a half of beekeeping, I thought I'd learned much of the "basics" of bees and honey. Smiley Maybe this year I'll invest in some tools to try and judge what my honey is coming from. Wow - beekeeping is never-endingly fasinating. Smiley

Beth
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Anonymous
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« Reply #9 on: October 22, 2004, 07:48:32 AM »

Goldenrod honey is great in baklava. In fact, one recipe that I have for it calls for "the darkest honey you can find". The glodenrod honey is about the darkest that I have been able to get from my bees.
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