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Author Topic: Top class pollen - Vipers bugloss  (Read 2139 times)
Finsky
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« on: November 21, 2007, 05:42:13 AM »


http://www.rirdc.gov.au/reports/HBE/01-047sum.html

http://images.google.fi/images?hl=fi&q=Vipers%20bugloss&oe=UTF-8&um=1&ie=UTF-8&sa=N&tab=wi



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reinbeau
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« Reply #1 on: November 21, 2007, 07:41:25 AM »

Vipers bugloss, or Echium vulgare, is in the Boraginaceae family, same family as our beloved Borage (see my avatar).  All are excellent sources of pollen, the girls are all over the borage in my garden. 
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- Ann, A Gardening Beek -  ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ

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Finsky
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« Reply #2 on: November 21, 2007, 07:45:48 AM »

Vipers bugloss, or Echium vulgare, is in the Boraginaceae family,

WOW; I did have noticed that even if I am botanist and flowers are my one hobby  : tongue

Borage (Borago officinalis or Echium amoenum)

I took seeds of natural Vipers bugloss 1994 from south Sweden. Since that it have been in my garden. It is 5 feet high.

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Cindi
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« Reply #3 on: November 21, 2007, 08:32:49 AM »

Echium vulgare, a biennial it appears to be.  I will be searching my seed catalogues to add this to my pollen plants, I would imagine being in the boraginaceae it could be an avide self-seeder.  Good, just another pollen plant that is very beautiful as well.  Have a wonderful and beautiful day, Cindi
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« Reply #4 on: November 21, 2007, 04:49:08 PM »

Unfortunately I can't grow it around here - well, I could, but it isn't hardy, so I'd be replanting it every year.  It's wild over in southern England.  They have such lovely weeds!
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Dane Bramage
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« Reply #5 on: November 21, 2007, 09:02:11 PM »

Quote
Echium plantagineum (Purple Viper's Bugloss) is a species of Echium, native to western and southern Europe (from southern England south to Iberia and east to the Crimea), northern Africa, and southwestern Asia (east to Georgia).[1][2]

It is an annual or biennial plant growing to 20-60 cm tall, with rough, hairy, lanceolate leaves up to 14 cm long. The flowers are purple, 15-20 mm long, with all the stamens protruding, and borne on a branched spike.[3]

Echium plantagineum has become an invasive species in Australia, where it is also known as Patterson's Curse, Paterson's Curse or Salvation Jane (particularly in South Australia). Other names are Blueweed, Lady Campbell Weed or Riverina Bluebell.

or is it this other one?

Quote
Echium vulgare (Viper's Bugloss) is a species of Echium native to most of Europe, and western and central Asia.

It is a biennial or monocarpic perennial plant growing to 30-80 cm tall, with rough, hairy, lanceolate leaves. The flowers start pink and turn vivid blue and are 15-20 mm in a branched spike, with all the stamens protruding. Stamens remain red and stand out against the blue flowers. It flowers between May and September. It is found in dry, bare and waste places.]

It has been introduced to North America and is naturalised in parts of the continent, being listed as an invasive species in Washington.

Either one are labeled as yet another "invasive species" that seem to be very beneficial to bees.   I hope we beeks don't get a bad rep!  hehe... I'm going to start a new brand of honey = INVASIVE HONEY!   evil Kudzu, Viper's Bugloss, Purple loosestrife, etc., etc., loads of varieties available!!  Wink
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Finsky
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« Reply #6 on: November 21, 2007, 11:15:32 PM »

.
Do you have experiences about giant Echiums? Some species are really tall.



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Cindi
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« Reply #7 on: November 21, 2007, 11:17:26 PM »

Giant Echiums, is that AKA Lupin?  Have a wonderful and beautiful day, in our great life.  Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
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« Reply #8 on: November 21, 2007, 11:28:09 PM »

.
Do you have experiences about giant Echiums? Some species are really tall.






Those are the Pride of Madeira I referd to in another thread. I would love to grow them here in South Florida but it is way to hot for them. The bees love them.

http://forum.beemaster.com/index.php?topic=11928.0

Sincerely,
Brendhan
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reinbeau
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« Reply #9 on: November 22, 2007, 06:55:35 AM »

Giant Echiums, is that AKA Lupin?  Have a wonderful and beautiful day, in our great life.  Cindi
Lupines are a different species.  Can you grow the Echiums there, Cindi?  I know they don't like it too hot or too cold, and thrive in a moister climate than I have here.
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- Ann, A Gardening Beek -  ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ

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Cindi
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« Reply #10 on: November 22, 2007, 10:14:29 PM »

Ann, seems there are many Echiums.  The "echium vulgare" that Finsky is talking about sounds shorter?

Brendhan's  "Pride of Madeira" that he loves is called Echium Candicans.

Giant Echium "echium pininianna

Sounds like echiums would be a beautiful addition to my bees' gardens and is worthy of experimentation to see if I can grow and overwinter these in my climate.  I am game for experiments with flowers.    I mulch some tender perennials and they come back, like the banana plants and the gunnera, we'll see.  I am sure I can obtain seed from somewhere, I see a site on the internet, but it is in the UK and I would rather shop Canadian.  Have a beautiful and great day, great health.  Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
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