Need Bees Removed?
International
Beekeeping Forums
July 22, 2014, 06:55:08 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: Beemaster's official FACEBOOK page
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar bee removal Login Register Chat  

Pages: 1 [2] 3   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Have you had your first frost..?  (Read 6475 times)
DennisB
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 206


Location: Louisiana MO


« Reply #20 on: October 31, 2007, 01:58:04 PM »

Louisiana MO  First light frost Sunday night 10/28. Warmed up to around 60 Monday. We have tall hills and the valley where the town is will usually get colder than our hills. Had a great rain Thursday and Friday that helped a lot.
Logged
weaverjc
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 4

Location: Madison County S.E. Central Texas


« Reply #21 on: October 31, 2007, 02:05:20 PM »

Central Texas, we had out first frost on the 23rd. I think Nov. 14th is generally our first frost. Temp. was 37.
Logged

Thanks, Have a Great Day.
WeaverJC
kathyp
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 15023


Location: boring, oregon


« Reply #22 on: October 31, 2007, 02:32:05 PM »

fist freeze last night.  tomatoes are toast, but peppers still ok.  will pick the rest of them today.  jalapeños and habaneros.
Logged

.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

 Alexis de Tocqueville
utahbeekeeper
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 137


Location: Utah


WWW
« Reply #23 on: October 31, 2007, 04:23:14 PM »

:::::: laffin' :::::: just ask UtahBees!  We have already had 2 snow events.  Didn't stick in valley tho, but fall mountains are beautiful.  JP
Logged

Pleasant words are like an honeycomb, sweet to the soul and health to the bones.  Prov 16:24
qa33010
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 912


Location: Arkansas, White County


« Reply #24 on: November 01, 2007, 12:41:34 AM »

  Tomorrow night is supposed to be 35.  We had something close to that the other night, thought it was frost, but it wasn't.  The golden rod hasn't been around much this year, but there's been a white flower blooming crazy.  Some years we've had a killing frost by now and sometimes not until Thanksgiving or later.  Usually had at least a light frost by now. 
Logged

Everyone said it couldn't be done. But he with a chuckle replied, "I won't be one to say it is so, until I give it a try."  So he buckled right in with a trace of a grin.  If he had a worry he hid it and he started to sing as he tackled that thing that couldn't be done, and he did it.  (unknown)
Cindi
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 9827

Location: Grindrod, B.C. Canada


« Reply #25 on: November 01, 2007, 10:24:26 AM »

The last three nights we have had frost, not total frost kill, but enough frost to blacken the leaves of the banana grove.  Yesterday, I cut them down to 3 feet tall, put on the sleeves and mulched the smaller new banana plants that I didn't have enough sleeves for.  I used the massive leaves from the plants as a total mulch, it will bring them safely over the winter.  I also cut down the 12 foot gunera tree and put its leaves on for the winter mulch.  I am now in the process of cutting back all perennials to a couple of inches high.  No frost last night, but then we have rain probably coming, yich.  Have a wonderful and great day.  Cindi
Logged

There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
kathyp
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 15023


Location: boring, oregon


« Reply #26 on: November 01, 2007, 10:33:32 AM »

oh cindi....you remind me of all the work i have yet to do.  i have been baking pumpkin bread...finally got through the giant zucchini.  next, drying peppers.  then plowing under the garden!

it actually has warmed up here a bit.  freeze last night, but 42 and gloomy today.  we do not usually have consistent freezes until later this month.

are those real bananas?  do you get to eat from those trees? 
Logged

.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

 Alexis de Tocqueville
EOC
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 16

Location: Kent Ohio


« Reply #27 on: November 01, 2007, 12:26:00 PM »

Every day since the 27th. One light one a couple weeks ago. Its quite the surprise to wake up and scrape ice off your car window using a cd cover because you cant find your scraper from last winter.

Time to go and see if I can find one at the store......
Logged
annette
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 5311


Location: Placerville, California


« Reply #28 on: November 01, 2007, 12:40:07 PM »

Reading all these posts, Boy, this may well be one of the warmest places in the country. We are in the mid 70's now, with nights around 45-50.  So should get the first frost soon, but the deep frost doesn't come until around December. The bees are bringing in lots of pollen now and very active. Queens are still laying, but drones appear to be mostly gone.

I feel ready now and pleased with all the work I have done. I am sure you all feel the same

Sincerely
Annette from warm and sunny Placerville.
Logged
CBEE
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 343

Location: Northern Kentucky


« Reply #29 on: November 02, 2007, 07:36:53 AM »

Just started getting some light frost. Got down in the 30's last night but supposed to warm up to around 60. Still got one med super I need to pull of.
Logged
Cindi
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 9827

Location: Grindrod, B.C. Canada


« Reply #30 on: November 02, 2007, 09:35:06 AM »

Ann, the species of banana that I grow is called "basjoo".  I have had the grove now for about 7 years, starting out with one little plant, you have seen the pics of it right that I have posted?  It is majestic and beautiful.  The "mother" plant lives for 4 years and then dies, but there are babies that are borne each spring, probably about 12 per year, I don't know where they all go (hee, hee) cause I never have that many that come into the winter, so I think they die off somewhere along summer's dog days.  I have yet to have any bananas grow on them, but I do know it is possible.

One person told me that if you cut out all the new shoots that come up in the spring, it will force the bananas.  I don't have the guts to do that, because I am afraid that I will have an insignificant banana grove, not the beauty that I am so proud of each year.  But, maybe next year I will cut out half the new shoots, I could live with that, maybe that will force the flowers that produce the fruit.  By the sounds of the amazing flower shoot that is produced, it would be worth it to venture down this path.

Did you ever see the pictures of the banana plants that Abejaruco put on the forum?  If you missed his posts of these beauties, go into that forum (member photos) and have a look, they are beyond your wildest dreams!!!!!

Still lots of work to do here.  I am building a new bed up near the bees to plant my garlic there this year.  My garlic was a fiasco this year.  Out of about 500 cloves planted, I have about 30 bulbs that matured to a half decent size.  I will have to purchase store bought garlic for my kitchen this year and that is gonna kill me, haven't done that in years.

We had such a cool and damp summer and the garlic was planted in a rather lower lying garden bed.  This garden is excellent for the curcurbits, but certainly not for garlic.  I know now that for sure. 

So I am digging, throwing rocks (you should see the rocks that I have pulled out of this small space).  When I am done with it and have the garlic planted, I will post pictures to show my new soil achievement for this year.  I have piles and piles and piles of chicken poopy stuff (with straw) that I am going to amend this soil with for the garlic, I know garlic loves the chicken crap and this new garden will get sun from sunup to sundown and it will have excellent drainage because it is high, built up and I will be making a stone wall to support the  raised bed.  It is directly above the blueberry bushes, so the drainage from this garden will be excellent for the blueberries too.  I think the chicken poopy stuff will leach into the soil and travel downwards to feed the blueberries, and by the time the water drains to the ditch, all the nutrients will have been sucked up by the garlic and blueberries (not to mention all the bee flowers that will have set their pretty little seeds for next year, heee, hee).  Oh brother, a'ramblin' I do go.  Have a wonderful and beautiful day.  Ann, get to work, you have work to do in this world today!!!!  Cindi
Logged

There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
reinbeau
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 2502


Location: Hanson, MA and Lebanon, ME


« Reply #31 on: November 03, 2007, 06:09:45 PM »

Oh, I's workin', Cindi, I got the garlic in, got all the bulbs in before the nor'easter today (which isn't amounting to squat, despite the weather idiots standing in the howling wind down the Cape shrieking about how hard the wind is blowing down there  rolleyes  We've only had .47", we were supposed to get 3-6").  Anyhoo, I had lots of alliums to plant besides the garlic, and some tulips, Daydream, my mother had them last year and they were gorgeous!  I'll take pictures in the spring.

Yes, I did see the photos Abejaruco posted, I am so jealous of your and his climate, where you can grow such lush tropical looking plants.  But I make do with what I've got here, and don't think I do too bad!  Wink

It's still so mild here, though, for the beginning of November, we really haven't had cold yet, the temps are going to be in the 50's again this week!  We'll see what happens closer to Thanksgiving.
Logged


- Ann, A Gardening Beek -  ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ

Click for Hanson, Massachusetts Forecast" border="0" height="150" width="256
Cindi
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 9827

Location: Grindrod, B.C. Canada


« Reply #32 on: November 05, 2007, 09:20:38 AM »

Ann, good girl!!!!  It's so nice to hear about someone else out there in the dirt (heee, heee), diggin' and a'plantin' the bulbs.  I have seen the pictures that you have posted of your place, and yes, my dear girl, I think that you do do pretty darn good, you have a lovely spot, and the time that you put into your gardens shines through, yeah!!!!!!  I wish I could give you some of the rain from my climate  tongue

I have every intention of getting the garlic bed finished today, lots of big boulders I will have to get my Husband to help me move.  He has a winch on his quad and these are so big, they are not fit for any human being to try to move on their own  Wink Wink

Ann, tell me about the Alliums.  I don't think that I am familiar with these, I have seen pictures of the great big ones that make that great blue ball on top of a single stalk.  Is that what you are speaking about?  Elaborate, I am interested. 

Have a wonderful and beautiful day, on our great Earth.  Cindi
Logged

There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
Finsky
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2791


Location: Finland


« Reply #33 on: November 05, 2007, 09:48:01 AM »

.
Last night in south east Finland we had 9F/-13C.
I had to put

I saved some plants from my greenhouse. One was that Red lip from Texas.
Sometimes we get permanent snow this time of year.
Normally permanent snow comes at the beginning of December.
Logged
mgmoore7
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 364

Location: Tampa, FL


WWW
« Reply #34 on: November 05, 2007, 12:28:34 PM »

And living in Florida the word frost is a bad word.

Current temps in south Florida 84F/29C to 78F/26C.

Sincerely,
Brendhan

Gotta love FL.  We are getting some cool nights at around 50 F but I am sure it will warm up in a few days.  We only get a few nights a year that get below 40F and that is not usually until Jan.
Logged

reinbeau
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 2502


Location: Hanson, MA and Lebanon, ME


« Reply #35 on: November 05, 2007, 09:22:08 PM »

Cindi, the alliums are small.  I've got the huge Globemaster purple alliums out front, they've been there for years, they haven't multiplied, the same five or six keep coming back.

These are little sweeties, bees love alliums, and these will come back year after year for them (provided I remember they're there and don't plant something all over them!).  I planted Allium oreophilum, Allium cowanii, Allium tanguticum 'Blue Skies' (there seems to be some kind of controversy about this variety, and McClure & Zimmerman are out of stock, so I can't link to the photo) and Allium moly 'Jeannine', photo from another site as M&Z again are out of stock - I must have got the last ones!  evil

This allium is known by many names, I love it and have it in my garden - the hummingbirds love it!  It's quite tall.  Allium siculum (nectoroscordum)Here is a nice page with many alliums listed with their pictures.
Logged


- Ann, A Gardening Beek -  ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ

Click for Hanson, Massachusetts Forecast" border="0" height="150" width="256
Cindi
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 9827

Location: Grindrod, B.C. Canada


« Reply #36 on: November 05, 2007, 09:49:29 PM »

Ann, I had a look at the Allium Siculum, now that is a very pretty one.  I would love to have one, I have some rare plant catalogues and I'll check them out when they come in and see if this cultivar is available.  Sometimes my base knowledge of plants is limited (and I thought I knew so much, hee, hee, hee).  I didn't realize there was such a variety of alliums. 

I couldn't go into the sites for the specific alliums that you posted names of, they were restricted or something like that.  But I am going to check out the other site you gave.  Awesome, have a wonderful day, best of this life.  Cindi
Logged

There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
reinbeau
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 2502


Location: Hanson, MA and Lebanon, ME


« Reply #37 on: November 06, 2007, 06:55:36 AM »

Cindi, that's odd, none of those sites are restricted, both are to retail catalogs, if they came up 'restricted' I'm sure they'd like to know that  shocked
Logged


- Ann, A Gardening Beek -  ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ

Click for Hanson, Massachusetts Forecast" border="0" height="150" width="256
tillie
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 1740


Location: Atlanta, GA

Bee in N Georgia on a Blackberry flower


WWW
« Reply #38 on: November 06, 2007, 07:08:40 AM »

It's never much of a winter in Atlanta - last year I only wore my winter coat a couple of weeks, but it is supposed to freeze tonight - low of 32 - we'll see.  I don't trust the weather report too much. 

Our first freeze usually comes more toward the middle of November and we almost always have a week of pretty warm weather some time in November's end or early December.

http://www.wunderground.com/US/GA/Atlanta.html?bannertypeclick=miniWeather2

Linda T in Atlanta
Logged

http://beekeeperlinda.blogspot.com
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"You never can tell with bees" - Winnie the Pooh


Click for Atlanta, Georgia Forecast" border="0" height="60" width="468
Cindi
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 9827

Location: Grindrod, B.C. Canada


« Reply #39 on: November 06, 2007, 08:52:26 AM »

Ann, further clarification, when I clicked on the first Allium oreophillum (blue typing), a window came up:

Security error -- domain name mismatch
You have attempted to establish a connection with fall.mzbulb.com.  However the security connection belongs to www.mzbulb.com
It is possible, although unlikely that someone may be trying to interrrupt your connection to this website.
If you suspect the certificate shown does not belong to fall.mzbulb.com, please cancel the connection and notify the site administrator.

I cancelled the connection, these kind of messages weird me out.  That was all.  But yes, Ann, I bookmarked the main allium site and have looked at it, totally cool.  Have a wonderful and beautiful day in our great life.  Cindi
Logged

There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
Pages: 1 [2] 3   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Beemaster's Beekeeping Ring
Previous | Home | Join | Random | Next
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines | Sitemap Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 1.323 seconds with 21 queries.

Google visited last this page June 26, 2014, 08:43:55 PM