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Author Topic: Garlic and other fall veggies  (Read 14331 times)
Cindi
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« Reply #60 on: September 06, 2008, 12:03:09 AM »

Oh dear, me bad....I still haven't harvested my garlic.  This will be a first that I am so negligent.  It is time to plant garlic, not harvest it.  The late, cold spring delayed so much, even the garlic, but I saw some of the beds today that are in bad shape.  Tomorrow is my promise to myself to dig it all up.  At the end of this month I will replant, probably most of what I have dug up.  I have dug up some that was growing out of place, no clue how it  got there, but they liked where they were growing, monster, pretty hot garlic, just how I like it.  Usually we harvest garlic the middle of July, but not a chance in the great green earth that it was even close to ready.  I missed that window, now I think that the cloves will be somewhat separated from the entire bulb, but oh well, so goes the deal.  Have a wonderful and most of an awesome day, Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
1reb
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« Reply #61 on: September 13, 2008, 09:09:54 PM »

I just brought a pound of softneck garlic and going to plant it this weekend.
Johnny
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randydrivesabus
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« Reply #62 on: September 13, 2008, 09:58:02 PM »

Johnny-it might be too early to plant it. you don't want it to grow much before the cold weather sets in.
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SgtMaj
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« Reply #63 on: September 13, 2008, 10:16:55 PM »

Yeah, I planted some mid-summer... it came up good, but all died.  It surely does not like the hot dry weather while still young.

I'll be out tomorrow trying to tidy up the edging on my garden, so It'll be ready for the garlic.  I screwed it up last time... I apparantly can't count right, or make a nice straight line, because I ended up being a half a cinder block shorter on one end than the other.
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1reb
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« Reply #64 on: September 13, 2008, 10:31:11 PM »

When will be the best time to plant the garlic?
Johnny
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SgtMaj
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« Reply #65 on: September 14, 2008, 01:14:24 AM »

Depends on what Ag zone you are in... but it's less about when by the calendar, and more about when by the temperatures.  I would think you'd be safe to plant it when it stops getting up above 80 for daytime high temps.
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randydrivesabus
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« Reply #66 on: September 14, 2008, 07:16:38 AM »

you should wait until after the first good frost at least. I plant mine here in Mid-October and then mulch it with straw. You're pretty far south Johnny so maybe the end of October would be best for you. Keep your planting stock dry until planting time. A hanging mesh bag will allow air circulation.
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Cindi
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« Reply #67 on: September 14, 2008, 03:09:40 PM »

Personally, I don't wait until after the first hard frost.  I plant anytime in the fall when I think that I want to plant it.  I don't think there is any hard and fastly set rules.  I would plant before the first hard frost, because I want the cloves to have begun to set some root hairs to hold them in the ground when frost heaves begin. 

I think Randy has it bang on the nail though with mulching.  That will keep the soil from heaving too much and uplifting the bulbs.  I have never tried that and have had the ding dang cloves bumped right out of the earth from the frost heaves.  That frost heave is a pretty strong dude!!!!  Many times I have had to go and push the cloves back down into the soft earth because of the frosty heaves....oops, am I ramblin' about frosty heaves?  Pardon please. 

I have wonderful mixtures of older strawy stuff that is mixed with chickeny poopy stuff.  I know that garlic loves chicken poop, and by the time next year comes, the mixture will be really, really aged, it is somewhat aged now, but will provide awesome nutrients for those garlic cloves.

Garlic needs to be planted in the fall so that it can grow every so slowly over the winter and get enormous underground root hairs growing so that when the summer comes and it needs moisture and so on, the bulbs will have that whole whack of help of their hair roots that they grew underground all winter long.  Plant it when it can get that winter moisture to grow great hair roots!!!  Have the most beautiful and most awesome day, Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
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« Reply #68 on: September 14, 2008, 03:26:12 PM »

I have to plant things based on old lore, holidays and feast days - otherwise I'd never remember anything!

Here in NJ we plant Garlic about Halloween.

We harvest softneck garlics about the feast of St. John the Baptist (June 24) and hardneck garlic about July 4.

I think the rule of thumb is to plant garlic no later than 3 weeks after the first hard frost (so probably no later than Thanksgiving pretty much anywhere.)

I just ordered mine from Filaree Farms - they do have quite a few varieties sold out but that just forces me to try something new. When you're talking garlic, how can it be bad? I meant to hold some of what we had last year out to plant but I would rather have it to eat!

We are harvesting figs like crazy these days - anyone have good uses (besides just eating them and jams?).

- Jess
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Moonshae
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« Reply #69 on: September 14, 2008, 05:45:00 PM »

We are harvesting figs like crazy these days - anyone have good uses (besides just eating them and jams?).

A nice spiced fig melomel?
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1reb
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« Reply #70 on: September 14, 2008, 08:40:51 PM »

Thank you  for the information I will wait  to plant my garlic
Johnny
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Jessaboo
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« Reply #71 on: September 15, 2008, 08:33:08 PM »

You know, Moonshae, that might be the ticket.

We made a really nice cherry melomel last year - can't see any reason figs won't be just as good - thanks for the thought!

- Jess
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poka-bee
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« Reply #72 on: September 16, 2008, 06:04:18 PM »

Jess, you just reminded me I LOVE figs..I forgot cause we don't have a tree...gonna have to fix that!  I'm busy canning applesauce now.  My Daughter has a little tree & so far I've gotten 3boxes & still more to pick! Next year gonna dormant oil it though cause out of 2 boxes maybe 50 apples don't have worm damage..chix don't mind but I don't like having to cut so much out!  Jody angry
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bud1
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« Reply #73 on: September 16, 2008, 07:54:20 PM »

miss jody dormant oil spray for scale on stone fruit, but with some malithon and fungicide good for all, have to do a spray program at bloom drop til harvest for apple magots
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poka-bee
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« Reply #74 on: September 16, 2008, 10:55:41 PM »

Thanks bud1, I've never had apple maggots on my trees, but my daughters tree 5 miles away..whoeee!! shocked Prolific apples though.  Don't know what type, don't keep well, get mealy, med size, not too tart but not sweet sweet either.  Great for crisps & sauce.  Jody
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SgtMaj
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« Reply #75 on: September 17, 2008, 02:12:17 AM »

My neighbor said: "why don't they just tie plastic sandwich bags around the fruit while they are still too young so the maggots can't get to them?"
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Cindi
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« Reply #76 on: September 17, 2008, 10:23:49 AM »

Jody, your crisp, your crisp, longing for your crisp.  That apple crisp that you baked for our bbq at Brian's was out of this world!!!!  Doesn't it bug the crag out of you when so much of an apple is lost to those ding dang maggotty brats!!!!  Can't stand that.  I have an apple tree that is ready for harvesting now.  It is not huge, it is called a Northland.  It is a pretty yellow apple with pink blush on it.  Very tasty.  It should have been ready at the end of August, but is now ready for the pick, I think it has about 30 apples, hee, hee.  Haven't counted, but I be thinkin' that.  My poor Gravenstein.  It should have had mounds of apples this year, it is now four years old, but it only had one.  Go figure that one out!!!!  I can't wait for next year, maybe it will give us some.  But, yes, unfortunately, if one does not put a spray on the tree, you will get hideous fruit.  That is what I have found out from my Sister, whom grows beautiful apples of many varieties on her farm which is about 30 minutes east of us.  She also has walnuts, I am thinking they must be ready now!!!   Zucchini bread here we come!!!  Beautiful and most wonderful of these days, loving and living life.  Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
reinbeau
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« Reply #77 on: September 30, 2008, 09:09:43 AM »

I plant my garlic at the end of October.  I don't want top growth before the hard winter sets in.  It sets roots and may sprout a bit underground, but it stays below the soil level til a thaw in the winter.  I mulch it with well-ground up leaves once the soil freezes, that's important around here with all of the frost heaving that goes on!  I got some to plant last weekend when we were up at the Common Ground Fair, I always buy my garlic for growing from the Maine growers, I know it'll make it down here.
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thomashton
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« Reply #78 on: October 28, 2008, 01:18:22 PM »

I just planted my garlic on Saturday. Gave it all a good watering and then the sun came out and gave it a good day of 60 degree weather. We've had a beautiful indian summer here in northern Utah (except for the two weekends I had family visiting earlier this month). Then the garlic got a good thick layer of straw mulch from the goat barn. I'll be looking forward to that garlic this summer.
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