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Author Topic: Nifty extraction ???  (Read 2426 times)
Burl
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« on: August 05, 2007, 10:52:27 PM »

Hey everybody ,    We seem to be quickly outgrowing our old 2 frame manual crank extractor that sprays honey over the top of the tub .  It pretty well takes us 6-7 hours to extract from 50 frames and then over an hour of clean-up .   Now I don't mind working hard at something , but if possible I like to work smart as well .  Someone told me that their parents used a washing machine to extract honey ,and I was interested in learning more .  However; their memory of details failed them.  Have any of you had actual experience with using a washing machine as an extractor Huh  Do you have any practical advice to offer Huh  What other extractor tips can you offer me to help make this a more efficient process ?   The nectar flow is full on here in British Columbia with fireweed and goldenrod in full bloom.     ---Burl---
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Of all the things I've ever been called ;
I do like "Dad" the most .   ---Burl---
deantn
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« Reply #1 on: August 06, 2007, 07:21:36 AM »

Why not try putting a cover over the extractor top when spinning it, would keep it from spraying all over the place.
Cut a hole where the handle is and drop it over the extractor. My opinion anyway.
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SystemShark
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« Reply #2 on: August 06, 2007, 08:02:34 AM »

I don't have any experience with this but it does sound interesting - if you had an old/unused washer to tinker with. It might even be interesting to fiddle with a dryer if there was a way to control the heating element.
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randydrivesabus
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« Reply #3 on: August 06, 2007, 08:08:51 AM »

i don't think the pump in the clothes washer is designed for transporting honey. and a clothes dryer doesn't have a flow outlet. but i have heard of using a clothes washer to clean salad greens and spinach.
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Robo
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« Reply #4 on: August 06, 2007, 08:27:28 AM »

Wash machine no,  outboard motor yes grin
http://forum.beemaster.com/index.php?topic=3673.0
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Cindi
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« Reply #5 on: August 06, 2007, 09:52:28 AM »

Burl, welcome to this forum, you being another Canadian, and British Columbian.  Good to see you on our forum.  You should put your location in your profile so we know what part of the world you live in.  I am on the southwest of B.C. 45 km from Vancouver.  Yes, the flow is going on strong.  Good luck with the washing machine extractor idea, sounds fantastic  Smiley  Have a wonderful day, great life.  Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
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« Reply #6 on: August 06, 2007, 05:16:41 PM »

You could remove the pump hose and put a honey gate in.
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bbqbee
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« Reply #7 on: August 08, 2007, 03:34:45 PM »

I have seen a garbage can extractor available from one of the bee supply houses just a couple of weeks ago. I think it was only 150 dollars or so. I don't think it is worth all the trouble to build one if you can get one for this price. Just my two cents worth (pun intended).
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deantn
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« Reply #8 on: August 09, 2007, 07:00:19 AM »

Have had a Garbage can extractor for many years now and very satisfied with the performance of it.
Just finished extracting another super Mon night and in less than 3 and 1/2 hours had them off the hive , uncapped ( which is the slowest part of the job) and extracted. Waited until next afternoon to put frames back on the hive but thats another story.
Think the extractor came from Nifty Bee, I don't think they are still in business but this is sure a great extractor for the money.
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abates99
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« Reply #9 on: August 09, 2007, 04:33:53 PM »

I have often wondered about using an old washing machine for an extractor.  If you look at the mechanics involved it looks like it would work, you would need to make som alterations to the machine but I think it would do nicely.  When I had the vision of using a waseing machine (while doing laundry) I thought that someone has had to try it before.  I hope we hear from someone who has.  Good Luck and keep us informed.
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Paul Andersen
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« Reply #10 on: August 11, 2007, 01:32:58 AM »

If you are lucky enough to find an old wringer washer you can mold the ringer with a comb pattern. Then you run your cappings  through it to make your own foundation!!
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Paul
Cindi
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« Reply #11 on: August 11, 2007, 11:26:07 AM »

Paul, now that is one of the most interesting things I have ever heard.  Too bad I upgraded to a newer automatic one, so many years ago  rolleyes  Have a wonderful day, beautiful life and health.  Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
JRS
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« Reply #12 on: September 10, 2007, 10:24:55 PM »

I saw something on the buffalo beekeeping site about using a trash can extractor with bike wheels on a vertical shaft to hold the frames in.
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The only stupid question is the question unasked,thanx for the help.
12th
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« Reply #13 on: September 18, 2007, 11:30:43 PM »

The washing machine idea seems fairly interesting, it'd be neat to see something like that actually being used. As for the mechanics of the whole thing, you'd have to make sure you had a machine with a reasonable spinning speed, is that correct? Not that I can think of any washing machines I've ever seen with a ridiculously fast spin on it.  ^_^
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