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Author Topic: Mums  (Read 1627 times)

Offline MrILoveTheAnts

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Mums
« on: September 27, 2007, 01:42:23 AM »
I'm not exactly a fan of these plants. But they're about all that can be found at the garden centers now and I have seen some bees on a few, very few. I think they're in the Aster genus but I can't really say because there isn't any scientific information on any of them. What's more annoying is I'm told by people that they're Perennials when they're found in the Annuals section. So I have 6 of these and assuming they are Perennials it gives some odd instructions. In the spring time I'm supposed to cut them back once they reach 3 inches high until it's mid July or August. What happens if I don't cut them? Will they bloom early or not as full?

Offline MrILoveTheAnts

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Re: Mums
« Reply #1 on: September 27, 2007, 01:53:20 AM »
Scratch that, Ohh I'm mad! The garden center had all the mums there labeled as Asters when they're actually in a different genus. A few of the plants seem to look similar though.

Offline reinbeau

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Re: Mums
« Reply #2 on: September 27, 2007, 08:02:29 AM »
Chrysanthemums are in the asteraceae family so yes, they are related to asters.  In some of them their nectaries are so buried - but as we know, if our girls can get at them they will!

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Offline MrILoveTheAnts

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Re: Mums
« Reply #3 on: September 27, 2007, 01:59:59 PM »
So buying these wasn't a total waste then.

Offline Cindi

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Re: Mums
« Reply #4 on: September 27, 2007, 02:49:34 PM »
MrILoveTheAnts.  I am not a fan of fall asters or mums either.  Just something about the flowers and how the look.  The bees love my fall asters, I have purple and pink and they go nuts on them.  These genus of plants need the shorter daylength to bloom, that is why they bloom in the fall.  Funny how plants are.  Have a wonderful day, best of this beautiful life.  Cindi

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Offline reinbeau

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Re: Mums
« Reply #5 on: September 27, 2007, 10:52:01 PM »
So buying these wasn't a total waste then.
Flowers are never a waste  ;)

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Offline MrILoveTheAnts

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Re: Mums
« Reply #6 on: September 28, 2007, 12:44:24 AM »
Cindi: Thanks for the advise, I wonder why it says to keep them cut back until July though.

I'm glad to say the bees were on the purple ones I bought too, which is good because so far they're my favorites. I'm not exactly sure why I don't like these plants otherwise. It's like they invade somehow. I see farms here full of them in pots before they flower. Then suddenly they start to appear everywhere. Garden stores almost sell nothing but them, they're out front of the grocery store, and someone even carved up a pumpkin already and is using a potted one for hair.
Giving in and buying some makes it worts. The plants are named after people like Jennifer, Jillian, and Helga. I'm fine with the name Aster but it's hard to say "I'm done planting Helga out in the garden," without turning a few heads. Why are they even called mums? Did this originate in the old country or something, shouldn't we be calling them mothers then?
I think if they just renamed them all I'd like them as a plant a lot better. When species are named after real people the name is Latin-ized a bit. For that matter let's just drop the names like Jennifer all together. No one calls a Sunflower, Billy or a Catmint, Charles.

Offline Cindi

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Re: Mums
« Reply #7 on: September 28, 2007, 01:10:51 AM »
MrILoveTheAnts.  Interesting comments  :)  I have no clue why they say to cut the plant back.  I would be leaning to just let Mother Nature take her course with this plant and not cut them back.  But then, I would not plant the crysanthemum period, like I said, I don't like them, I don't mind the Asters. 

I know it bugs me too.  You see these two types of plants EVERYWHERE for sale, and I think that they are gawdy and overrated.  I plant them only for the bees.  I actually bought and planted a very pretty light yellow fall Aster, because I loved the shade of yellow.  But I haven't seen a single bee on it, which surprised me.  But it is pretty, it is out the back, the only yellow plant in the bee gardens that are about 95% blue coloured flowers, it kind of stands out and looks very cool.  I'll take a picture of it when it stops raining, eeeks....rain, rain, rain.  Have a wonderful day, best of this great life.  Cindi
There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service

Offline KONASDAD

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Re: Mums
« Reply #8 on: September 28, 2007, 11:18:59 AM »
You cut back mums periodically in spring up to July 4rth in out area  so they have more blooms. If you dont cut'em back, they get leggy and dry out more easily and dont get as big. My bees are on the mums somewhat, but not extremely hard. Mums are very popular aropund her. I usually buy'em from dig your own farms to save money. They look great in large plantings, like velvet when trimmed in spring a few times.
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Offline Cindi

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Re: Mums
« Reply #9 on: September 29, 2007, 11:47:34 AM »
Konasdad.  Now that is good, there is an answer to why they are cut back, it makes total sense.  Leggy plants are not attractive at all, now the beautiful carpet look is awesome.

I grew the most disappointing plants in my life this year.  Virginia Stocks.  Oh brother.  I am a fan of Night Scented Stocks and all stocks.  I thought the Virginia Stocks would be fabulous and wonderfully scented.  Nope, barely any fragrance at all, and leggy and messy beyond what you could ever imagine.  I eventually pulled them out and transplanted some other flowers to take their place.  Thank goodness I didn't have too many areas where I planted them.  Have a wonderful day, beautiful life we live.  Cindi
There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service