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Author Topic: Mantis in Granada  (Read 1652 times)

Offline abejaruco

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Mantis in Granada
« on: September 22, 2007, 04:26:22 PM »
It is autumn, it is the Granada time, the explosive fruit, between grenade and pomegranate.
The mantis is "fishing", waiting for an incautious victim, and she has time.


Offline Mici

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Re: Mantis in Granada
« Reply #1 on: September 22, 2007, 06:48:31 PM »
OMG OMG the best fruit ever!!!! well...one of the best.
abejaruco, you also must have some of those "golden aples" don't ya? i don't really know how you call it, we call it "kaki" or "golden aple", the...yellow to orangy stuff with mushy inside, yuuuuumiiiiii!!!!

and of course, the ultimate killer!

Offline abejaruco

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Re: Mantis in Granada
« Reply #2 on: September 23, 2007, 04:11:28 AM »
Hi Mici! Yes I have a kaki in my orchade. The fruit will be sweet in two months, like the oranges and avocados.

I´m finishing the figs, grapes and prickly pears from my hobby land.

What seasonal fruits have you in your country?

Offline Michael Bush

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Re: Mantis in Granada
« Reply #3 on: September 23, 2007, 12:28:00 PM »
Looks like a pomegranate to me.
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Offline abejaruco

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Re: Mantis in Granada
« Reply #4 on: September 23, 2007, 02:30:47 PM »
No doubt...is a burst pomegranate.


I was playing with the words granada, grenade, granate, pomegranate..."The word "grenade" is derived from the Old French (pome) grenate ("pomegranate"), in reference to the general size of early grenades, and because its shrapnel pellets reminded soldiers of the seeds of this fruit."

Offline Cindi

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Re: Mantis in Granada
« Reply #5 on: September 29, 2007, 12:11:27 PM »
abejaruco, such a great picture of the Mantis.  They have patience, you say, that is cool.  Have a wonderful day, best of life.  Cindi
There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service

Offline JP

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Re: Mantis in Granada
« Reply #6 on: September 29, 2007, 04:52:45 PM »
I opened a pomegranate from my dad's garden today, it was very good, takes a while to suck all the pulp off the seeds but its a wonderful type of insanity. I have always been intrigued by the praying mantis, they are a most interesting insect, very regal. I happen to love the fruit from the prickly pear, may have to grow one one day.
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Offline biglipzit

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Re: Mantis in Granada
« Reply #7 on: September 30, 2007, 03:25:29 AM »
No doubt...is a burst pomegranate.


I was playing with the words granada, grenade, granate, pomegranate..."The word "grenade" is derived from the Old French (pome) grenate ("pomegranate"), in reference to the general size of early grenades, and because its shrapnel pellets reminded soldiers of the seeds of this fruit."

They sell a spice liquid for drinks down in the Caribbean which is made mainly from pomegranates. It is called grenadine syrup. Always wondered where the grenadine came from...

Offline Cindi

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Re: Mantis in Granada
« Reply #8 on: September 30, 2007, 12:10:02 PM »
Ha, I love a drink called a Harvey Wallbanger, one of the ingredients in this drink is grenadine, I love that taste!!!!  Have a wonderful day, great life.  Cindi
There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service

Offline abejaruco

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Re: Mantis in Granada
« Reply #9 on: October 01, 2007, 01:43:07 AM »
Quote
I happen to love the fruit from the prickly pear

The prickly pear, came from North America with Hernán Cortés, and actually has colonized Africa and the whole Mediterranean. It is so fresh and sweet, I always has a plate in the fridge.