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Author Topic: SHB PICS  (Read 5769 times)
sc-bee
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« on: September 16, 2007, 08:03:57 AM »

Take A peek: click on image to enlarge










« Last Edit: September 16, 2007, 10:28:56 AM by sc-bee » Logged

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« Reply #1 on: September 16, 2007, 08:33:13 AM »

I thought I'd add to this lovely collection:

Larvae in the corner of the slatted rack in my dead hive:



Small Hive Beetles in the corner of an active hive:



Yuck.

Linda T still in Quebec
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« Reply #2 on: September 16, 2007, 09:02:01 AM »

I feel your pain. I lost a NUCK this year to the SHB. What a nasty mess. I now use Fipronil for control.

Steve
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« Reply #3 on: September 17, 2007, 09:46:21 AM »

I feel your pain. I lost a NUCK this year to the SHB. What a nasty mess. I now use Fipronil for control.


How do you go about using it without damaging your bees?   I'm unsure how to safely do it using coroplast.
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« Reply #4 on: September 17, 2007, 09:55:40 AM »

Holy smoke!!!  Those pictures are sick, especially Linda's.  I cannot stand the hideous parasites that plague the honeybees.  As far as I know, we don't have SHB in my area and I hope they never come up here.  What a nasty thing and I feel for you all that have that incideous messy beetle and its disgusting larvae.  What a terrible thing.  Still....have a wonderful day, love our life we're livin'.  Cindi
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« Reply #5 on: September 17, 2007, 10:37:30 AM »

Yes SHB are absolutely disgusting.  Most control measures don't work, e.g. guardstar.  Trapping them is the best option but it only works to a point.

The beetles can smell a hive for many miles so it's quite hard to prevent an infestation from happening.
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« Reply #6 on: September 17, 2007, 06:07:39 PM »

It's funny with the permacomb I don't have that issue quite like that. There are SHB in the hive but no real larva. It's very nice.


Sincerely,
Brendhan
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« Reply #7 on: September 17, 2007, 08:07:56 PM »


"How do you go about using it without damaging your bees?   I'm unsure how to safely do it using coroplast."

Every beekeeper that I know personally uses it. If used properly with the coroplast it controls the SHB and does not harm the bees. My mentor has 100 plus hives and swears by it. It is hard to argue with 100% success. Since I started using it, I rarely see a SHB. Before, they were everywhere and like I said, I lost a NUC that looked just like the posted pictures.

Steve
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sc-bee
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« Reply #8 on: September 17, 2007, 09:40:25 PM »

I understand that fipronil was once used in France but has now been ban.

What is coroplast? Is it the plastic material that the signs are made of?
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« Reply #9 on: September 17, 2007, 11:37:36 PM »

fipronil is bad stuff but when used correctly your bee's will be fine, this is a post I did a few years ago, I have seen it used this way but never had to here at my place, SHB's just dont do anything here, might be because all these dang fire ants, nothing survives on this ground for over a few minutes..... there are a few pictures of SHB damage on this post below also.

http://forum.beemaster.com/index.php?topic=1974.0
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« Reply #10 on: September 18, 2007, 06:08:33 AM »

I'm ordering Nematodes - but I don't know where to put them on my deck.   I can put them in the soil under the deck 15 feet or so below, but clearly my SHBs do not pupate in the soil but in my hives, so maybe I'll put the nematodes in something like disposable aluminum baking sheets filled with dirt slid under the hives below the SBB???

I'll email Jamie Ellis and let you all know what he suggests.

Linda T in Atlanta
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« Reply #11 on: September 18, 2007, 07:02:35 AM »

I'm ordering Nematodes - but I don't know where to put them on my deck.   I can put them in the soil under the deck 15 feet or so below, but clearly my SHBs do not pupate in the soil but in my hives, so maybe I'll put the nematodes in something like disposable aluminum baking sheets filled with dirt slid under the hives below the SBB???

I'll email Jamie Ellis and let you all know what he suggests.

Linda T in Atlanta


Tillie, I have heard this before about SHB's pupating in a hive and was told that SHB's havent evolved to pupatate in a hive yet, they said with all the studies they have seen that SHB's still need soil to pupate in, unless your hives BB's are covered in dirt) this was a idea someone had mentioned on the internet as a idea and it was spread like a bad story,  If you have found any proof  of SHB's pupating in a hive I would like to see it because I haven't heard any thing else from this in about a year, thought this story would have died by now, I would like to see some proof of this if there is any facts .....

here's what Dr. Keith S. Delaplane, said

Beetle larvae do not spin webs or cocoons in the bee hive but rather pupate in the soil outside the hive.


as for as I last heard this has never change  , here in Ga you might not ever get one to raise under your hive, dont need to you can have 5-30 fly in a single night, unless in a closed study all the bettles you see just might be visiting unless you are seeing hives full of larva, then you could have some under your hive.... I know of one Beek in Ga that used this Maxforce Gel  and he brought the findings to the Ga beek meeting, he had found 2500 Bettles in one hive that was killed by the gel, said it works great....
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« Reply #12 on: September 18, 2007, 08:53:57 AM »

If they don't pupate in the hive, what happens to those tons of larvae in my picture above?  They aren't developed enough to fly and obviously hatched right there in the hive....Huh

Linda T in Atlanta
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« Reply #13 on: September 18, 2007, 09:00:25 AM »

eggs will hatch in hive's (close to food source) when doing a inspection have you seen the cocoons, it takes them a while to pupate, they dont cap cells like bee's, they make a cocoon like wax moth larva just smaller, you will be able to see them if they did... here is the time it takes

where it requires 38-81 days to develop from egg to adult , if they pupated in the hives you would be able to see them, would you agree?
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« Reply #14 on: September 18, 2007, 09:14:43 AM »

Nothing like the smell of shb in the morning, clears the sinuses right up! grin
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« Reply #15 on: September 18, 2007, 09:58:01 AM »

Eeeks, I am getting more grossed out by the minute about these SHB.  Linda, I have also heard about the predatory nematodes  being used in the soil to kill the underground bugs.  We use them here in my area to kill the bad bugs underground.  It works like a hot dam!!!!  My carrots, turnips, (all root veggies), when I apply these predatory nematodes do not get wormy, they are great little underground workers, yeah!!!

I wish you all the best of luck with your SHB, it is such a nasty thing I can't stand it!!!!  Have a wonderful day, enjoy our life we have.  Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
sc-bee
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« Reply #16 on: September 18, 2007, 08:43:35 PM »

>If they don't pupate in the hive, what happens to those tons of larvae in my picture above?  They aren't developed enough to fly and obviously hatched right there in the hive....

Your right --- they hatch right there in the hive. After that crawl out to the ground--borrow and pupate (or whatever). Most within about a foot from the hive---some as far as meter or further.

I heard the same thing about the claim of them also pupating in the hive but only from Internet sources!!!
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« Reply #17 on: September 18, 2007, 08:58:36 PM »

So mine must crawl out of the hive and dive bomb 15 feet below to the ground under the deck - disgusting.....glad I don't stand under the deck - it would be raining SHB worms at this point! 

My two strong hives seem to be surviving the onslaught - knock on wood.

Linda T in Atlanta
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« Reply #18 on: September 18, 2007, 09:57:24 PM »

You can treat the ground under the hive but that will not prevent SHB from flying in from your neighbors untreated hive.

I just returned from our local beekeeper meeting. SHB nightmares were the hot topic tonight.

Steve
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« Reply #19 on: September 20, 2007, 05:39:32 PM »

what does it smell like?  are there any signs that you would see like droppings, etc?

i had a hive earlier that had a sour smell.  i went through it frame by frame and could not find anything out of the ordinary.  only thing i noticed was some fine, almost black, very tiny, granules on the board i put under to check for mites. 

the smell only lasted a couple of weeks, and i never found the source of the black stuff although there were some ants around.

i chalked it up to whatever they had brought into the hive at that time.
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« Reply #20 on: September 20, 2007, 08:37:02 PM »

the one I smelled at another guys place smelled like vomit, it is the smell of honey fermenting, like a whisky mash before you distill it  shocked  Wink  evil .....
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« Reply #21 on: September 20, 2007, 09:43:05 PM »

Figured by your picture you'd know something about sour mash. shocked rolleyes Lips Sealed Wink
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« Reply #22 on: September 20, 2007, 10:21:00 PM »

don't think it smelled like vomit....although vomit is the one thing that i can not stand and will avoid at almost all cost.  give me blood and guts anytime!  smiley  mine was a sharp smell. kind of sour.  the kind of smell that hits the back of your nose and makes it twitch.

anyway.  doesn't seem to be an issue.  was just curious about the SHB smell.

sour mash....would that be like when the neighbors still blew in KY?  don't really remember the smell, but i do remember the BOOM!!!!
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.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

 Alexis de Tocqueville
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« Reply #23 on: September 20, 2007, 10:42:41 PM »

kathyp, have some one to do a (foul brood) test on your hive.
Or if you know how do it yourself.
You break the cap on a sealed brood cell, use a large kitchen match or any stick that size. Stir the larvae
and pull the stick out slow. If it ropes out then it's foul brood.
Like when you are pulling honey from the honey gate and when you close it, you will have a string.
if it strings out thats the sign.
American foul brood will string out more than European foul brood.
Some call it a "glue pot" oder.
Hope you don't have it.
doak
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sc-bee
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« Reply #24 on: September 20, 2007, 11:45:59 PM »

Kathy ,
What was blooming--- any goldenrod or aster. Has a smell of sour or wet socks. May have been what you smelled, especially if it is gone now and brood etc. looks healthy.
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« Reply #25 on: September 20, 2007, 11:53:49 PM »

when they are curing goldenrod and aster you dont want to be down wind, them hives will stink!!!!!! smeels to me like a month old set of gym socks that are about the size of a hot air ballon  shocked ......
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« Reply #26 on: September 21, 2007, 01:12:32 AM »

TwT...sc-bee, that might well be what it was.

doak, there was no disease in the hive.  the smell lasted about as long as it would have taken them to cure some funky honey.  it was odd that it was only in one hive, but that hive was putting away stores like crazy for a few weeks while they were queenless.

just curious, not worried.  fortunately, i have never had SHB, but didn't know there was a smell that went with them.
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.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

 Alexis de Tocqueville
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« Reply #27 on: September 21, 2007, 01:35:56 PM »

Glad to hear that.
doak
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« Reply #28 on: September 23, 2007, 08:54:07 PM »

I was in my largest hive today, and when i opened the lid about 50 of them darn things ran down into the hive. This was very discouraging for me and my babies.  I made some traps with the mineral oil and the lure and put it in all my hives.  I about had a heat stroke doing it, but hopefully it will work. i will let you all know tomorrow night if it works. I didn't think we had the shb in Missouri, but i know now.
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« Reply #29 on: September 24, 2007, 11:48:27 AM »

There will be no mistake about where the smell originates with shb, you will see the larvae, and smell the destruction. Vomit is probably a good description of the smell, but what kind of vomit? There are so many types, who wants to go there, I don't. oh well I gues I did. grin
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My pictures can be viewed at http://picasaweb.google.com/pyxicephalus
and
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« Reply #30 on: September 25, 2007, 10:09:40 AM »

Eeeeew.  Sounds gross, too gross to even think about it, ooops, me too, I just did think about it  rolleyes  Have a wonderful day, Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
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« Reply #31 on: September 25, 2007, 11:46:36 PM »

I have a beetle problem in a hive with Honey Super Cell. When I opened it a few days ago there were hundreds of beetles, but no larva and no damage, I guess the beetles are having a difficult time with the HSC.  Hopefully I can do something with the Tracheal mite problem (I think) that is causing the population to  flounder.



 
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