Need Bees Removed?
International
Beekeeping Forums
August 29, 2014, 08:52:15 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: ATTENTION ALL NEW MEMBERS
PLEASE READ THIS OR YOUR ACCOUNT MAY BE DELETED - CLICK HERE
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar bee removal Login Register Chat(1)  

Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Wow, great family reunion and swarm capturing for drama  (Read 1069 times)
Cindi
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 9827

Location: Grindrod, B.C. Canada


« on: September 10, 2007, 10:06:19 AM »

What a day!!!  Our weather has been beautiful now for days, and Saturday came the big family reunion on my Mother's side.  She was one of 13 children, who had children and their children had children.  You can only venture a guess how many people were here, we all love children, so there were lots and lots.  We turned the heat up in our pool to 88 degrees and it was wonderful for the kids to swim long into the night, yeah!!!!  We were all assembled to our family reunion.  Since the passing of my last Aunt last year, I am now the Matriarch of my Mother's side, and I wanted to gather our family.  It was a hoot and a hollar.  We have so much cultivated land, there were little parties going on all over the place, where different folk gathered to chat and visit.  And the food, wow, thank goodness for my Sister and family that shares our property, we pulled off a great night.

It is getting dark now in our area by about 7:30 PM, twilight for the half hour, then the darkness falls.

Just as the burgers were all being put on the barbeques, my oldest Nephew who lives on our property came running to me like a streak of lightening, out of breath and could barely speak.  He and his buddy had been hanging out behind the apiary, walking around the property, looking at things.  He said that the found a ball of bees in a tree, he thought it might be my bees.  I thought, no way on this good greeen earth.  Probably a bald-faced hornets nest.  So, I took a walk.  He showed me the tree.  Sure enough, a very large swarm clustered on a reasonably low branch.  6:30 PM, one hour til the twilight is set.

I went back to the house, announced to a couple of my family that I had some fun to get into, they kind of looked at me weird.  Told them that I had to go and capture a swarm.  Well, you would have thought that Frankenstein would have walked into the yard.  People's jaws dropped and I heard sounds of alarm and then sounds of intrigued minds.  I had a following all the way out the back.  Many people bringing their cameras, all wanting to see what I was going to do.

First thing was my husband got his extension ladder.  I went to the bee house and got equipment.  Prepared for the capture, taking my time.  My husband went to the tree, we both observed the manner in which we would get them into their box.  Loooked like a pretty simple one to me, and thank goodness it wasn't too far up.

I donned all my gear (even gloves for goodness sakes).  Took my cardboard box that has a hinged lid and up the tree I went.  The limb was thick, not a chance of cutting it down, so I pushed the bees into the box, got almost all of them in by pushing them along, they all fell exactly where I wanted them.

Back down the tree, dump the bees into the box.  Put the frames back into the box, inner cover on, lid on.  Now back up to the tree to get the rest.  So I did.  Went back down to the box and dumped the bees onto the pilllow case that I had on the ground infront.  Bees are obeyed lovely and walked right up into the box.  Yeah!!!!  The queen was there, as the bees stayed.  By this time my crowd of fans and started to diminish, guess they saw how many bees were floating around and got kind of worried.  A few of the more adventurous ones remained with me and my husband.  We stood watching them, talking about what was going on with this colony.

What a day, and it was fun to be able to show all my family what things I am up to with the bees, I was able to show off some of my learned new skills.  Yeah!!!!!

After it was dark my husband and I went and closed up the entrances, and put this colony into its new home in my apiary, opened the reducer and left them alone.  They will be happy and welll looked after.  I will perform a mite count sticky board on them today, leave that in for 3 days. 

I know this question will come up.  Are they my bees that swarmed.  Nope, absolutely not, not a doubt in my mind.  The activity in my apiary has not changed one little bit, the hives look identical (as far as hive numbers go) as they have.  I am positive it is from another beekeeper that has his bees only a few properties away.  I had examined my colonies indepth about a week ago and there are no queen cells.

This was  not a reproductive swarm, this colony that the bees came from must have been simply way, way too overcrowded.  We don't get swarms this time of year in my climate.  The end of July is pretty much the latest.  Unless there is something that I am not just understanding.  I think these bees have not been looked after as far as swarm controls go. The beekeeper probably is just too busy and hasn't kept an eye on things.

I have not yet ascertained what I will do with this swarm.  It was a very, very large one.  I don't have an awful lot to compare to, but it pretty much filled the bottom 1/3 of the box and I had trouble putting the frames back in as it was so full, but I gently pushed the bees out of the frame's way. 

It is too late for building up for wintertime, unless I give it several frames of capped brood.  We have winter cluster occurring around the beginning of November, so I actually have no clue if they could build up in a month and a half.  Maybe I can get some advice here from my forum friends?

I am thinking that I should unite this swarm with another weaker colony, but the colonies are all pretty strong looking, especially some of them.  I am thinking that there would be too many bees if I united this swarm colony with any of my colonies.

This weekend was a blast, family, bees and lovin' and livin' my life.  Have a wonderful day.  Time to get kids ready for school.  Cindi
Logged

There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
kathyp
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 15099


Location: boring, oregon


« Reply #1 on: September 10, 2007, 10:32:00 AM »

did you give them drawn comb?  my weak hive has requeened and i am feeding the crap out of them in hopes that they will have time to get it together before winter.  you have 6 to 8 weeks (we hope) before it gets bad.  calculate what you think they can do in that time and is it enough to get them through winter.

the comb might be the biggest issue.  you need the queen to lay as much as she can between now and bad weather.  you can feed all winter if you need to.  you could also steal some brood from other hives to give them a shove in the right direction.

Logged

.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

 Alexis de Tocqueville
sadvic
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 4

Location: Hopelessly Lost


« Reply #2 on: September 10, 2007, 03:43:02 PM »

What kind of sticky board do you use to check for mites?
Logged
buzzbee
Ken
Administrator
Galactic Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 5437


Location: North Central PA


WWW
« Reply #3 on: September 10, 2007, 05:22:20 PM »

Cindi,
If you feed feed feed you'd be surprised what the swarm is capable of producing.I ahve a swarm I capured toward the end of June and left it to itself and they have a three medium hive pretty well prepared for winter. If I would have fed instead of letting them forage on their own while it was extremely dry they would have really built up fast. A swarm is a much more motivated bunch most times than packages are.  Even with cool nights they can build up if they  have feed!                                                                Have a great day ,Ken                           
Logged
Cindi
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 9827

Location: Grindrod, B.C. Canada


« Reply #4 on: September 11, 2007, 01:08:55 AM »

Kathy, Ken.  Holy carumbu.  YOu will never in your wildest dreams figure out what this swarm is doing!!!!!  I fed them 1/2 an inner frame feeder the day captured (Saturday night).  I checked them yesterday, all gone, that is one half gallon.  Fed them again this morning, (Monday), tonight the s.s. is all gone again. I will be out before they are out in the AM and fill them right up to the tippy top.  They will get one gallon.  I will keep on feeding them as long as they are taking it.  We have a massive nectar flow going on right now and I mean massive.  The days have turned hot and sunny and let me tell you, there is bee plants everywhere.  I can't tell you how much is going on here, and around my neighbourhood because it is too much to speak about.  I have been observing the bees intensely, it is consuming me.

An annual plant that self-seeds every year has surprised me this year.  It is called Mignonette.  It has the most beautiful fragrance you can imagine when you walk by.  It is in the stock family.  The bees are going simply beyond nuts on it and all the fall asters I have in glory right now.  Not to mention all the subshrubs that are revelling in this late season sunshine.

Yes, I gave the swarm all drawn comb.  I had left over drawn comb and that is what I gave. Today, when I filled up their inner feeder, I added a super of foundation, that may have had some beginnings of comb being drawn.  It is the Pierco plastic foundation that I have still lingering around here.  I sprayed it heavily with a light s.s. solution, in the hopes that it will entice them upwards.  We will see.  I know that swarms love to draw comb, so this shall be at their disposal, to use or not to use.

I have performed the 3 day mite counts on my hives.  That is another story.  Basically no mites. Hmmm....go figure, guess the sugar shakes and the screened bottom boards have performed miracles.  I will recount in another post the numbers, but they were so low that I can't even really caculate them using the equation which I have previously posted about.  I think my mite counts are below 1 per day and that is extremely good.  But.....I am still going to use a control of Oxalic acid in December.  Right now, there absolutely no need to do any mite control whatsover.  THis pleases me immensely, after having lost all my 8 (or so?) colonies last winter due to neglect on my part to control that hideous varroa destructor mite, eeh gads.

Today I placed a sticky board in the swarm colony.  This will definitely tell me if this is a swarm from a neighbouring beekeeper.  If there is high mite levels (which I suspect if it came from elsewhere), I will know it did not come from my girls.  Obviously this is a swarm that left because conditions were so tight they had no choice, hence, I would consider that no mite treatments have been performed.  Time will tell that tale.  In two days I will bring it out, count and check.  (I may get a little nosey tomorrow and pull the sticky board out for a quick look).  In all reality, I know it is not my bees.  My bees look absolutely no different than they looked previous to the swarm.  They are going great, doing well.  I am seeing all kinds of orientation flights in all the colonies, and this is good too.  Rambling, late night stuff.

Sadvic.  What I use for a sticky board is basically very thin plastic, it is called here styrene.  I spray Pam on it, place it below the colony and leave it there for 3 days (more exact 72 hours).  Any longer, and the debris from the hive makes it very difficult to count mites, any shorter and there is not an accurate prorated average daily mite drop count.  Important, 72 hours (approximately), divide the number of mites counted by the hours in the hive and multiply by 24.  That is the simply accurate daily natural mite drop count.  Sounds rather intricate, but is not.

Sticky boards can be made of anything that can sit under the hive, the mites that naturally drop off the bees (whether through grooming themselves, or simply moving about) do not have a chance, they are stuck on the sticky boards.  I have seen after the 3 day time period, mites that are trying to crawl around, ha, they are stuck there though, cannot go back onto the bees to do their devilish work.

Anything will work, even try a stiff type cardboard, white is preferable, because the mites are anywhere from a golden brown to almost black looking. YOu will know them when you see them.  They are kind of oval shaped, shiny, and if you look real close you can see their hideous little legs.  Ooooh, those dog dang mites.  Have a wonderful day, best of our beautiful life and great and healthy wishes for all.  Cindi

Logged

There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
DayValleyDahlias
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 1629


Location: Aptos, California


WWW
« Reply #5 on: September 11, 2007, 10:36:11 AM »

Cindi,

What a great story!  Thats some wonderful entertainment for a family reunion...

Logged


<img src="[url]http://banners.wunderground.com/weathersticker/miniWeather2_both_cond/language/www/US/CA/Aptos.gif
" border=0
alt="Click for Aptos, California Forecast" height=50 width=150>[/url]

"Become vegetarian/vegan, and no one gets hurt"
2-Wheeler
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 202


Location: Leyner, Colorado - USA


WWW
« Reply #6 on: September 12, 2007, 10:58:37 PM »

Great story and I bet it made a memorable family reunion!  Is it common for swarms in September?

I thought that after you take the honey, you are supposed to push-them down into more cramped space? If they tend to swarm so late, then what do you do after removing supers?  (I'm probably showing my lack of training.)
Logged

-David Broberg   CWOP#: CW5670 / CoCoRaHS #CO-BO-218
Blog: http://beesandblooms.blogspot.com/
My Weather: http://www.leyner.org/
My Flickr Album: http://www.flickr.com/photos/dbroberg/
Cindi
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 9827

Location: Grindrod, B.C. Canada


« Reply #7 on: September 13, 2007, 09:56:54 AM »

2-wheeler.  Swams in the middle of September here at not common at all, rather uncommon I would say.  Someone's bees just got way too big, maybe they were busy and didn't look after any splits that should have been made with this hive.  Our swarming season is May to the end of June, and of course swarms and come later too, but that is the prime swarming season.  Have a wonderful day, beautiful life.  Cindi
Logged

There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Beemaster's Beekeeping Ring
Previous | Home | Join | Random | Next
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines | Sitemap Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.212 seconds with 21 queries.

Google visited last this page August 24, 2014, 02:30:31 PM