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Author Topic: IPM/mite management  (Read 5281 times)

Offline Lesli

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IPM/mite management
« on: July 20, 2004, 07:27:17 PM »
Hi all,
As I check my hives, I open some drone cells, and look at all the adults closely, and so far, I haven't seen any mites.

I'm using screened bottom boards, and feeding syrup with essential oils. Given that mites are becoming resistant to the current meds, I'd just as soon not use them, if something else will suffice.

So I wanted to do a mite drop check, and considered how best to do it, without going out to buy "sticky boards."

Here's what I did: I took a sold bottom board and lined it with a cut down piece of drop cloth, clear plastic, cheap, never used. I stapled it down to the board, and then coated the board with Crisco. I put all of this under the screened cottom board, with the open side facing the back of the hive. After 24 hours, I can just yank out the plastic sheet and check for mites against the white of the Crisco.  Next weekend, I can take out the solid bottom board, or leave it in.  I'll repeat the process on my other hive.

Anyone see anything wrong with this?
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Lesli
http://beeyard.blogspot.com/

Offline lobstafari

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IPM/mite management
« Reply #1 on: July 20, 2004, 08:35:54 PM »
Its very similar to my check.  I use a piece of galv. steel sheet, and coat with crisco, but notice if its on too heavy, it kills bees!!  Same general concept....should work fine I think (opinion)---------Jeremy

Offline Lesli

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IPM/mite management
« Reply #2 on: July 20, 2004, 09:15:12 PM »
The screened bottom board is between the bees and the Crisco. Of course, they may discover the gap in back between the SBB and the Crisco... But since it's only for 24 hours, with luck, there shouldn't be a problem.
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Lesli
http://beeyard.blogspot.com/

Offline Robo

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IPM/mite management
« Reply #3 on: July 21, 2004, 09:13:36 AM »
Other than labor and manipulation intensive, I don't see a problem with it.  You might want to consider modifying your SBB to accept a tray.

click image for larger view


There are also plans on beesource.  It makes the job that much easier and you can do it more often if you like.  It also means you can leave the SBB on all year and just close them up for the winter.
I find mineral oil in a spray bottle is much easier (and less messy) than trying to spread crisco.
"Opportunity is missed by most people because it comes dressed in overalls and looks like work." - Thomas Edison



Offline Lesli

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IPM/mite management
« Reply #4 on: July 21, 2004, 11:23:31 AM »
But the Crisco made my hands so soft!  :P
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Lesli
http://beeyard.blogspot.com/

Offline Lesli

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IPM/mite management
« Reply #5 on: July 21, 2004, 09:27:44 PM »
I did my 24-hour drop check, and I'm not sure of what I saw. I had hoped that the mites would be distinct, but amid the other debris, I'm just not sure.

Do others use a magnifying glass, or am I just due for a checkup?

Maybe I'll try the powdered sugar shake...
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Lesli
http://beeyard.blogspot.com/

Offline Robo

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IPM/mite management
« Reply #6 on: July 21, 2004, 09:37:35 PM »
The fact that you haven't seen any mites in the drone brood is a good indication that your mite count is low.  Assuming you have opened up ten or more drone cells.

Since your hive is new this year, the bees were probably treated before you got them, so it is not surprizing that you have a low count.  Just continue to be diligent in your inspections, because it is late summer/early fall that the mites start getting heavy.  Some speculate it could be robbing of heavy infested (therefore weak) feral colonies.  I have read tha untreated, 1 mite in the spring correlates to 200 mites in the fall.
"Opportunity is missed by most people because it comes dressed in overalls and looks like work." - Thomas Edison



Offline lobstafari

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IPM/mite management
« Reply #7 on: July 21, 2004, 09:49:52 PM »
Im at 5 per hive per 48 hr period, and use a magnifying glass.  Once you get a looksie you can identify them with a naked eye, but use a glass for now....all kinds of other cool things to check out too!! Im expecting my mite population to pick up soon, just have to find a good market for them and Ill be rich!! 8)  :P  :lol:

Offline Lesli

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IPM/mite management
« Reply #8 on: July 22, 2004, 08:45:14 AM »
Mite flambe? Mite jelly? Chocolate covered mites? Mites in a truffle sauce? Mite omlette?
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Lesli
http://beeyard.blogspot.com/

Offline lobstafari

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IPM/mite management
« Reply #9 on: July 22, 2004, 10:01:45 AM »
Now theres a new twist!  I was thinking more along the lines of mite necklaces, charms, bracelets, wall posters (if I got enough) and display them in a gallery as art!! :lol:  OK just bein' silly...good luck at it!

Offline michael l burnett

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mites
« Reply #10 on: July 22, 2004, 06:24:10 PM »
mite,,,mite not!

Offline asleitch

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IPM/mite management
« Reply #11 on: July 23, 2004, 05:01:30 AM »
If you are not sure what you are looking for, here's a couple of pictures out of a very infested colony - looking in the drone cells.

The legs on them make them very distinctive.







Adam

Offline lobstafari

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IPM/mite management
« Reply #12 on: July 23, 2004, 07:00:53 AM »
Wow :shock: plenty of mites there huh?  Those are fantastic pictures!  I tried taking a few but they all came out too blurry

Offline Lesli

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IPM/mite management
« Reply #13 on: July 23, 2004, 08:25:02 AM »
Thanks for the pics. I have also opened drone cells, figuring that they would be distinct against the white of the puae, and saw nothing. I think the problem with my sheet technique was that there was so much debris--so it was hard to tell what's what. On the other hand, my eyes are pretty poor. I'll need a magnifying glass for this project!
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Lesli
http://beeyard.blogspot.com/