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Author Topic: perenial seed harvesting  (Read 1571 times)
Zoot
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« on: August 27, 2007, 12:30:23 AM »

Has anyone had experience with collecting and storing seeds from cone flowers and flax flowers?
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reinbeau
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« Reply #1 on: August 27, 2007, 07:36:13 AM »

I have never actually harvested echinacea seeds (coneflowers) but I get plenty of babies every spring.  I'm sure it's as simple as collecting the seeds before the birds do!  Just wait until the heads are dry and brown, and cut them off.  The seeds should just shake loose, if not then a gentle rub will release them.  Same with flax, I'd expect, although I don't grow them.
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- Ann, A Gardening Beek -  ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ

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Zoot
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« Reply #2 on: August 27, 2007, 11:52:10 AM »

I've actually collected a large quantity in that fashion; the flax flowers leave tiny pods that dry and are easily opened to allow access to the seeds. What I'm in the dark about is storage until spring (or should they be sown now?), exposure to cold, freezing, etc.
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reinbeau
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« Reply #3 on: August 27, 2007, 12:59:09 PM »

Well, you can sow some now, many seeds appreciate the stratification time that winter offers.  To store seeds over the winter you just need to keep them cool and dry.  Paper envelopes in a dark box or something should do.  Do both.  Sow some now, save some for spring.  I know the echinacea will germinate in place in the garden after overwintering in the ground.
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- Ann, A Gardening Beek -  ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ

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KONASDAD
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« Reply #4 on: August 29, 2007, 03:24:52 PM »

I collect lots of seeds too. I started drying them this year on a cookie sheet placed in the back of my SUV parked in the sun w/ the windows shut. Works great and no effort at all. I've been collecting , drying and broadcasting in the back area so I'll get a meadow effect w/ native local perennials-hopefully. Crab grass fights back!
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"The more complex the Mind, the Greater the need for the simplicity of Play".
Zoot
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« Reply #5 on: September 04, 2007, 10:35:28 PM »

Do you broadcast your seeds in the late summer/fall or wait for spring? Both?
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Cindi
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« Reply #6 on: September 28, 2007, 12:18:30 AM »

Zoot, when I sow seeds I usually wait until spring time to do it.  Seeds can be sown in the fall, they will germinate when they are good and ready in the spring.  The reason why I wait until spring is because I have fear that the birds will eat the seeds that I sow.  If I am sowing seed outside, I don't have the chance to rake it in usually, I just sow on top of the soil.  Many seeds require light for germination and others require darkness, raking in the seed is good because it provides a little of light and dark.

Many seeds require a "cold" period prior to germination, this allow them to germinate better, like Ann was talking about.  Some seeds, like snapdragons, require being frozen for at least 48 hours, helps aid germination.  So a fall sowing is a good thing too, just depends on personal preference.

When I store my seed, I do as Ann says, in a cool, dark place, no exposure to light, a box with a lid is perfect.  Also when I store my seed I store them in ziploc bags, I put in a little bit of dessicant to keep the seeds bone dry.  I have done this for years and seeds store very well. Sometimes with my "purchased" seeds, if I have any left over, I store those in the refrigerator in a special spot.  All of my seeds I gather, I don't refrigerate though.  YOu have received lots of good comments on your thread you started, yeah!!!  Have a wonderful day, beautiful life.  Cindi
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KONASDAD
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« Reply #7 on: September 28, 2007, 10:14:36 AM »

I broadcast both spring and fall. You get more sprouts in spring, but those that sprout and take in fall usually survive. Lots of spring sprouts just dry up. I am looking only for the hardiest of plants that will get nothing. No extra water, no fertilizer, nothing. Its an area i want to ignore in my yard.
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"The more complex the Mind, the Greater the need for the simplicity of Play".
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