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Author Topic: Its official, theres no Varroa here.  (Read 2056 times)
mick
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« on: October 16, 2007, 07:42:43 PM »

http://www.getfarming.com.au/pages/farming/articles_view.php?fId=999999200710101025

The Australian Honeybee Industry produces around 30,000 tonnes of honey each year, as well as products like beeswax, live bees, and royal jelly, collectively worth around $65 million. In addition, the industry provides pollination services worth over $1.7 billion to other agricultural industries.

Commercial Beekeeping in Australia – a new publication from the Rural Industries Research and Development Corporation (RIRDC) – provides a comprehensive overview of the Australian beekeeping industry. It describes the physical and cultural environment in which beekeeping is undertaken and gives details of production methods commonly employed by beekeepers.

“Beekeeping in Australia has developed to meet our unique climate and flora,” said Margie Thomson, RIRDC General Manager for Research, “Australian beekeepers have shown great ingenuity in devising methods of production and patterns of management that have led to a successful national beekeeping industry.”

The industry is made up of over 9000 registered beekeepers that manage over 600,000 hives. With over 25 per cent of honey exported each year, the price received by commercial beekeepers depends on both domestic and international demand for honey products. There is also a growing market for pollination services and queen bees.

“Beekeepers have been assisted in their endeavours, particularly in recent years, by world standard research,” Ms Thomson said.

“RIRDC, through its Honeybee Research and Development program, is pleased to be a vital part of the national apicultural research effort,” she said.

The publication provides key statistics and information on the honeybee industry, and explains the key industry opportunities and threats.

One significant threat to the industry is the varroa mite, which can spread rapidly, killing off entire honeybee colonies.

“At the moment this pest has spread to nearly every country, with Australia being virtually the only exception,” Ms Thomson said.

“RIRDC is working with the industry, as well as with those industries dependant on honeybee pollination services, to ensure that we provide the best possible protection and preparedness for the varroa threat,” she said.

The Rural Industries Research and Development Corporation is a partnership between the Australian Government and industry to fund and manage priority research across three key areas – new rural industries, selected established industries, and national rural issues.

“Through innovation Australia’s rural industries—like the honeybee industry—are continuously growing more productive, more resilient and more sustainable,” Ms Thomson said.

Commercial Beekeeping in Australia (Second Edition), is aavailable from RIRDC – visit www.rirdc.gov.au or phone 02 6272 4218 for more information.



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« Reply #1 on: October 16, 2007, 07:58:03 PM »

Remind not to buy bees from Australia. They would have no idea on how to deal with Varroa.

Actually Mick that is pretty awesome. What are you doing about your NZ neighbors?

Sincerely,
Brendhan

Going to Tassie Oct 29-Nov8

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Moonshae
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« Reply #2 on: October 16, 2007, 08:19:17 PM »

If varroa are in NZ, it won't be long.
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Cindi
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« Reply #3 on: October 16, 2007, 08:33:47 PM »

Mick, thanks for the post.  That is a wonderful thing to read.  But something I wonder about.  My bee course instructor always imported bees from Australia and did not last spring.  I asked him why and I am not sure, but I thought he may have told me it was because of varroa concerns.  But I must not be quoted that this is 100%, because I can't quite remember.

Mick I must ask you this, and answer if you know.  Was there ever any issues with varroa in your country, that you know of.

I can't stand it when I can't quite remember things that have been said to me and it bugs the living daylights out of me too. This is why I am curious.  Have a beautiful and wonderful day in our great life.  Cindi

Mick, have you guys had any rain yet?  I sure hope that you have.
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
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« Reply #4 on: October 16, 2007, 09:45:40 PM »

Varroa are in NZ and there is a lot of issues going back and forth between the beekeepers in NZ and the ag department. Then there are also the import export issues with honey between .au and nz.

It's a bad soap opera.

Sincerely,
Brendhan
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mick
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« Reply #5 on: October 17, 2007, 02:55:02 AM »


Actually Mick that is pretty awesome. What are you doing about your NZ neighbors?

Sincerely,
Brendhan

Going to Tassie Oct 29-Nov8



We spray them with insecticide at the airport before they go on the Dole.
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mick
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« Reply #6 on: October 17, 2007, 02:57:53 AM »

We simply do not have a lot of the problems that occur in other countries due to our relative isolaton and very strict almost paranoid quarantine regulations.

No rain, only a few showers here. Bushfires have already occured around Sydney. We havent had the heatwave of this time last year fortunately.
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« Reply #7 on: October 18, 2007, 06:37:33 AM »

mick, i believe i read somewhere that australia accidentally acquired some apis cerana from asia. do you know of this?
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« Reply #8 on: October 18, 2007, 07:50:33 AM »

From http://agspsrv34.agric.wa.gov.au/Ento/bee.htm

Apis Cerana is a tropical bee from Asia that has now spread to Papua New Guinea (PNG). It has a high propensity to swarm and will readily swarm and establish nests on ships and cargo such as containers and pipes. It is also reported to swarm onto ships while at sea. The proximity of PNG to Australia and movement of vessels through the Asian region to Australian ports increases the likelihood of an incursion of this and other tropical bees. There have been three known incursions of Apis cerana in recent years, one near Brisbane in April 1995, one at South Australia in June 1996 and the other at Darwin in June 1998.


Sincerely,
Brendhan
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eivindm
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« Reply #9 on: October 18, 2007, 10:28:06 AM »

Moving bees between countries are generally a very bad idea as all animal/insect-imports are. Especially between continents.  If all countries had forbidden bee imports many years ago, I guess the spread of diseases would have been much much slower.   
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« Reply #10 on: October 18, 2007, 11:18:48 AM »

The cape bee / Africanized bee issue is a great example of that. Also those who happen to put queens in cages in their shirt pocket and fly them home.

If you look in Bee Culture maybe Bee Journal you will see a huge ad for aussie bees.

Sincerely,
Brendhan


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Cindi
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« Reply #11 on: October 18, 2007, 10:01:48 PM »

Actually, I think the Cape Bee is a horror show. Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
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« Reply #12 on: October 18, 2007, 11:09:04 PM »

Actually, I think the Cape Bee is a horror show. Cindi

The cape bee is a wonderful bee biologically speaking. It just happens when outside of it's native enviroment that it can deliver havoc. In it's native area it has adapted to an incredibly hostile enviroment and managed to thrive there.

Sincerely,
Brendhan

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Cindi
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« Reply #13 on: October 18, 2007, 11:20:14 PM »

Brendon, yes, you are right in some ways.  But I still believe that it is sad that this bee is "out of it native environment" where it survives in I presume, obvious harmony.  I don't know enough about the species, but of little what I know, it raises havoc.  A false queen.....hmmmm....Best of this great and beautiful day, have a wonderful day.  Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
mick
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« Reply #14 on: October 19, 2007, 03:25:03 AM »

The top end of Australia is about half the size of the US and has a population of three men, several dogs, thousands of kangaroos, wild Pigs, Crocs, Camels, Goats, Horses, Buffalo, Cane Toads and all manner of feral imported pests.

There could be anything up there, no one is around to see it.
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