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Author Topic: How much do you sell a pound of honey for in your area?  (Read 14898 times)

Offline Queen Bee

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How much do you sell a pound of honey for in your area?
« on: July 15, 2004, 12:19:58 AM »
What is you price for 100% pure, light amber colored honey? I am getting ready to sell some of my honey (for the first time). I have checked around at the local prices and they really seem to have a wide price range...

Offline Beth Kirkley

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How much do you sell a pound of honey for in your area?
« Reply #1 on: July 15, 2004, 04:42:26 PM »
I've been selling mine for $4 a pound in Central Georgia. But this is my first year, so I'll have to see how that goes. So far so good.

Beth

Anonymous

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How much do you sell a pound of honey for in your area?
« Reply #2 on: July 16, 2004, 12:56:55 AM »
I've been selling mine for $3.75 a pound in Southwestern Pennsylvania. It's been doing pretty well.

Offline SageBrush

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How much do you sell a pound of honey for in your area?
« Reply #3 on: July 16, 2004, 10:35:44 AM »
$4.00 per around here.

Offline Bee Boy

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How much do you sell a pound of honey for in your area?
« Reply #4 on: August 15, 2004, 06:02:53 PM »
Now, if I ever get any honey I'll probably sell it for little over four bucks a pound. That seems to be the average price around here.
Bee Boy

Offline leominsterbeeman

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How much do you sell a pound of honey for in your area?
« Reply #5 on: August 23, 2004, 09:14:20 PM »
Last year in North Central Mass,  I sold for:

For an 8oz Jar - $2.50

For a 16 oz Jar - $4.50

this year I will have 2lb jar, 5lb jar and 6oz mini bears.

I'm planning on:

2lbs - $7.50

5lbs - $13.50

6oz - mostly used for gifts, but if someone wants 'em I figure on $2.00.

Offline Jerrymac

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How much do you sell a pound of honey for in your area?
« Reply #6 on: November 10, 2004, 12:04:51 PM »
The local beekeeper I talked to yesterday said they sold theirs for $4.50 a quart And a bigger opperation up in Tulia Texas went $5.50 quart.

A quart is what? Two pounds? So $2.25 to $2.75 a pound around here.

You guys are expensive.
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How much do you sell a pound of honey for in your area?
« Reply #7 on: November 10, 2004, 01:10:32 PM »
Jerrymac,
A quart is more like 3 pounds, so the ones in your area are selling it for $1.50 to $1.83 per pound. Is that wholesale or retail price?
A local commercial producer (over 1000 hives) that I know is getting $1.60 a pound for his honey straight out of the extractor (no straining, filtering or bottleing involved) and into 55 gallon drums. He sells his to a honey packer.

Offline Beth Kirkley

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How much do you sell a pound of honey for in your area?
« Reply #8 on: November 10, 2004, 02:48:32 PM »
Jerrymac-
Wish I could get that good of a price on honey at the grocery store! And grocery store honey is nowhere near as good tasting as fresh honey. I pay about $3 a pound at the grocery store - and we eat alot of honey (in coffee). We go through about 4-6 pounds easily a month, so we have to have ONE hive just for our own intake.

Beth

Offline Jerrymac

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How much do you sell a pound of honey for in your area?
« Reply #9 on: November 10, 2004, 02:58:02 PM »
The lady I talked to was straight from extractor and bottled by her. The Tulia guy mixes his for a consistant color from what I understood. She said people have told her that hers was a lot better.

Man I wish I hadn't put the name Jerrymac, sounds like when my mother was mad at me. "Jerry Mac!!!! Why did you bust out those windows?"

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Offline Jerrymac

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How much do you sell a pound of honey for in your area?
« Reply #10 on: November 10, 2004, 03:04:46 PM »
Then I failed to mention, they sell it to small stores and health supply shops.
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Offline Finman

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How much do you sell a pound of honey for in your area?
« Reply #11 on: November 10, 2004, 03:41:33 PM »
It seems to be about same price like in Finland.  I take  3,5 €/pound in 12 pound boxes and  4€ from  pound container as single pieces.

1€ = 1,3 US $

Offline Horns Pure Honey

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How much do you sell a pound of honey for in your area?
« Reply #12 on: December 15, 2004, 12:08:56 AM »
I checked here, 4 bucks a pound (16 oz.) I also did a national look and it looked like the average was 4 bucks, bye
Ryan Horn

Offline beesharp

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How much do you sell a pound of honey for in your area?
« Reply #13 on: December 15, 2004, 07:08:50 AM »
12 oz Bear - $4
16 oz Bear - $5
24 oz Skep - $6
32 oz Plastic Queenline - $8

Retail prices, which are just a bit higher than grocery store prices here.
Local honey can (and should) be priced at a premium.

Jim

Offline Jerrymac

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How much do you sell a pound of honey for in your area?
« Reply #14 on: January 24, 2005, 08:53:35 AM »
I was just wondering if all these prices include the cost of the container? How much does it cost for bottles and such?
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Offline beemaster

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How much do you sell a pound of honey for in your area?
« Reply #15 on: January 24, 2005, 10:24:33 AM »
I had a period of my life where I sold honey via the website - it was going to be an experiment for the logbook section on MARKETING your honey. I did really well and actually ran out of product quite quickly.

I had:

1/2 pint jars going for $4.95
Pint Jars going for $8.95
Quart size $16.95

Plus shipping (which frankly was as much as the product.)

Now.... (with all humblenessity meant) I know these prices seemed outragious, but afterall, Beemaster's Honey was a BRAND NAME and had a relatively SMALL volume to sell. There was both supply and demand - the market place allowed me to name my price :)

I sold mostly 1/2 pint and pint jars (decorative glass) and shipped via US Postal Service and sold a total of 11 gallons in 9 weeks via the website. I won't do the math here, but it was pretty darned impressive.

My point being, you need to create a product base, make your honey something GREATER than "Honey" itself - and you can name your price. Labeling is a great inexpensive way to increase price - nothing beats a country looking homemade label on a jar of honey.

Also, working with local road-side vegatable stands or farm markets can be a great source of sales. It THIS case a quality made sign over your products can greatly boost the price of every ounce you sell.

The biggest thing you can do to increase sales though (in a roadside marketing site) is choice of product. Have different sized jars, cut-comb, and other products including candles (even if the candles are bought wholesale and added to your product line) no one says you are stuck with just your own products, although it is best to do so.

Selling through the web though is tough. I got lucky only because of a good placement on the search engines. I set up an account with Paypal, so the money was always in the bank before I bothered jarring the product. Shipping was tough to get around, going plastic jars over glass jars HELPED cut cost to the consumer, but was NOT enough of a savings over using "Decorative Glass Jars" in my ads.

Creating a product name the best single way to increase revenue and every penny per ounce counts. Quality is number one, because no matter how good the name, if you give people crap - you will never see them again.

Thought I'd share this with everyone. I rarely speak of the days when I attempted to have commercial sales on my site - it was exciting, I did really really good, but it was NOT what I wanted to do.

After all the honey was gone, I had a site that was STILL set up to go and I had to disable the sales page (meanwhile people were looking to order more honey - yes, I had several repeat customers who loved the decorative jars for gift giving) but once I ran out of honey, telling the customer that it would be 6 months before I had more honey JUST didn't cut it - so I closed up shop RATHER than go commercial.

There was even a suggestion that I have "Beemaster's Premium Blend" a mix of quality New Jersey (The Garden State) finest honey - where a small amount of the "Blend" was mine and the rest from local beekeepers. The idea (suggested to me by a local grower sounded interesting, but I didn't wan't to mislead anyone into thinking it was a "SEASONAL MIX" of my own best honey flavors, which I think it would have done.

And at that point where does it stop? Literally, one drop of Beemaster's honey to a quart of generic NJ Honey - ugh. So I never went with the PREMIUM BLEND idea.

There is my tale. It was fun and for nearly three months I was making multiple trips to Staples for boxes and bubblewrap and to the post office to ship. But honey sales by mail is tough if only for the weight factor. Now.... only if you could sell FREEZE DRIED HONEY, hmmmmm there's an idea  :shock:
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Offline Robo

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How much do you sell a pound of honey for in your area?
« Reply #16 on: January 25, 2005, 04:31:57 PM »
I think this guy has you beat on the gimicky name.
http://www.bumblebarf.com/
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Offline Horns Pure Honey

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How much do you sell a pound of honey for in your area?
« Reply #17 on: January 26, 2005, 05:51:34 PM »
that is kinda sick and funny at the same time, I dont think of them barfing it up though. bye
Ryan Horn

Offline TwoBigCats

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Re: How much do you sell a pound of honey for in your area?
« Reply #18 on: July 03, 2009, 11:28:55 PM »
I had a period of my life where I sold honey via the website - it was going to be an experiment for the logbook section on MARKETING your honey. I did really well and actually ran out of product quite quickly.

I had:

1/2 pint jars going for $4.95
Pint Jars going for $8.95
Quart size $16.95

Plus shipping (which frankly was as much as the product.)

Now.... (with all humblenessity meant) I know these prices seemed outragious, but afterall, Beemaster's Honey was a BRAND NAME and had a relatively SMALL volume to sell. There was both supply and demand - the market place allowed me to name my price :)

I sold mostly 1/2 pint and pint jars (decorative glass) and shipped via US Postal Service and sold a total of 11 gallons in 9 weeks via the website. I won't do the math here, but it was pretty darned impressive.

My point being, you need to create a product base, make your honey something GREATER than "Honey" itself - and you can name your price. Labeling is a great inexpensive way to increase price - nothing beats a country looking homemade label on a jar of honey.

Also, working with local road-side vegatable stands or farm markets can be a great source of sales. It THIS case a quality made sign over your products can greatly boost the price of every ounce you sell.

The biggest thing you can do to increase sales though (in a roadside marketing site) is choice of product. Have different sized jars, cut-comb, and other products including candles (even if the candles are bought wholesale and added to your product line) no one says you are stuck with just your own products, although it is best to do so.

Selling through the web though is tough. I got lucky only because of a good placement on the search engines. I set up an account with Paypal, so the money was always in the bank before I bothered jarring the product. Shipping was tough to get around, going plastic jars over glass jars HELPED cut cost to the consumer, but was NOT enough of a savings over using "Decorative Glass Jars" in my ads.

Creating a product name the best single way to increase revenue and every penny per ounce counts. Quality is number one, because no matter how good the name, if you give people crap - you will never see them again.

Thought I'd share this with everyone. I rarely speak of the days when I attempted to have commercial sales on my site - it was exciting, I did really really good, but it was NOT what I wanted to do.

After all the honey was gone, I had a site that was STILL set up to go and I had to disable the sales page (meanwhile people were looking to order more honey - yes, I had several repeat customers who loved the decorative jars for gift giving) but once I ran out of honey, telling the customer that it would be 6 months before I had more honey JUST didn't cut it - so I closed up shop RATHER than go commercial.

There was even a suggestion that I have "Beemaster's Premium Blend" a mix of quality New Jersey (The Garden State) finest honey - where a small amount of the "Blend" was mine and the rest from local beekeepers. The idea (suggested to me by a local grower sounded interesting, but I didn't wan't to mislead anyone into thinking it was a "SEASONAL MIX" of my own best honey flavors, which I think it would have done.

And at that point where does it stop? Literally, one drop of Beemaster's honey to a quart of generic NJ Honey - ugh. So I never went with the PREMIUM BLEND idea.

There is my tale. It was fun and for nearly three months I was making multiple trips to Staples for boxes and bubblewrap and to the post office to ship. But honey sales by mail is tough if only for the weight factor. Now.... only if you could sell FREEZE DRIED HONEY, hmmmmm there's an idea  :shock:
interesting data points, thx very much.

here in silicon valley, multiple local beeks are currently selling local honey for $17 per quart.

Offline johnnybigfish

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Re: How much do you sell a pound of honey for in your area?
« Reply #19 on: July 03, 2009, 11:54:14 PM »
The local guys around here sell a quart for between 10 and 15 bux...I sell mine for 5 bux a lb..I'll also sell 12 oz for 5 bux! :-D
for me, 5 dollars is just a figure I dreamed up pretty much. I really eat and give away more than I sell!....good things are meant to share! :)
(unless you can get 5 bux!)
your friend,
john