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Author Topic: Hello from New Mexico  (Read 792 times)

Offline Antiguasdelnorte

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Hello from New Mexico
« on: December 12, 2013, 11:27:09 AM »
 :) Seasons Greetings!! Hi my name is Ray I am new to this site have been a beekeeper for several years. I live in central New Mexico and love to talk bees, conduct extractions, and capture swarms.  I enjoy working with Hot colonies and spend significant time studying honey bee behavior. I currently have 7 hives and just equipped up to maintain up to 37 hives.  Hopefully through splits and hive captures i will meet my goal in 2014.

Offline Robo

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Re: Hello from New Mexico
« Reply #1 on: December 12, 2013, 11:53:04 AM »
Ray, welcome to Beemaster Forums.  If you love to talk bees, you have come to the right place.   When you say Hot colonies,  I assume you mean Africanized?   I'm sure there are man here that would like to hear about your techniques.
"Opportunity is missed by most people because it comes dressed in overalls and looks like work." - Thomas Edison



Offline Antiguasdelnorte

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whats hot to me...
« Reply #2 on: December 13, 2013, 12:01:59 AM »
You pose the question that we all wonder when is hot - africanized..  Where I live Africanized genetics are a fact of life in the feral bee world. One of our local beekeepers has summarized the studies they participated in concerning our feral bee genetics. It is amazing our bee genetics are almost as diverse as our human population!.  I rate Honey bee defensiveness or their Hot tendency-defensive behaviors on a scale of 1-10, With1 being mild Italian type behaviors to 10 being all out scary.  I have some hive that were very defensive when they were extracted, maybe a  7-8 which is equal to a few thousand angry bees flinging themselves at your veil and stinging gloves multiple times and following you several hundred feet while under prolonged attack, Yes this is risky and equipment is everything so is efficiency. Getter done but be smooth and deliberate. Ignore your fear and stay on task, repeat equipment is everthing.  I work to minimize stings with protective gear and work to be efficient to avoid excessive trauma to the hive. Once their captured and hived and acclimated to their new environment and building comb, I like to re queen, and if necessary divide and conquer. Some really hot hives are better suited to re queening after being extracted with their comb and brood.  I use survivor queens and with our local genetics they are about a 3-5 on my Hot scale, frankly a little hotter than ideal but they are well suited for or semi arid environment. I am now taking my Best hives in term of comb building and filling capacity and gentile behavior for my replacement virgin queens. Hopefully the bees  will maintain their sustainability and production while keeping their defensive behaviors in check.

Offline Joe D

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Re: Hello from New Mexico
« Reply #3 on: December 15, 2013, 10:49:19 AM »
Welcome to the forum, Antiguasdelnorte.  I like mine as gentle as possible.  I have had some that would get after you 30 yards before you got to the hives.  Good luck to you and your bees.




Joe

Offline tefer2

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Re: Hello from New Mexico
« Reply #4 on: December 16, 2013, 02:43:15 PM »
There is not a lot of information on methods for keeping Africanized bee hives.
We will certainly enjoy any knowledge and you can provide us on working your hives.
Will look forward to your posts. Welcome to the group!

 

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