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Author Topic: Warped foundation  (Read 1460 times)
afretired
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« on: August 07, 2007, 10:21:07 PM »

I've been putting new wax foudation (with the vertical wire) in some deep frames.  On a few of them, no matter what I've done the foundation ended up warped. It has an arch in it making it off centered in the frames.  What am I doing wrong, or what do I need to do?

Dave
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kathyp
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« Reply #1 on: August 07, 2007, 10:53:50 PM »

are you using pins in the sides?
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.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

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afretired
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« Reply #2 on: August 07, 2007, 11:14:03 PM »

Well, I guess that is why I'm considered a "newbee".  Smiley I have a few frames that had the pins, and I have used them in the past when I replaced the foundation.  But since I was working on new frames, and I don't have any pins, I never thought about them. I guess I had better get some.  Thanks

Dave
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Robo
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« Reply #3 on: August 08, 2007, 07:58:22 AM »

Personally, I would go for cross wiring instead of pins.   The pins will easily break thru the wax,  and there is also a higher tendency for the bees to chew the wax around the pins.
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bassman1977
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« Reply #4 on: August 08, 2007, 10:25:15 AM »

I completely agree with Robo.  I have had the best luck keeping straight foundation by just using horizonal wiring.
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kathyp
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« Reply #5 on: August 08, 2007, 10:32:01 AM »

i used starter strips in the brood boxes this year and it worked well once i got the size right and got them secured properly.  saves a lot of money on foundation.

 had foundation last year with wires.  no problem with sagging.  no problem with pins.  getting it securely in the groove with the bar tight against it, is a large part of the battle i think. 
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.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

 Alexis de Tocqueville
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« Reply #6 on: August 08, 2007, 11:47:06 AM »

I completely agree with Robo.  I have had the best luck keeping straight foundation by just using horizonal wiring.

And here I thought you were an avid fisherman huh   DOAH!!!!  Nifty avatar 
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bassman1977
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« Reply #7 on: August 08, 2007, 07:00:57 PM »

Quote
And here I thought you were an avid fisherman    DOAH!!!!  Nifty avatar

I am that too.  Goes both ways I guess.  cheesy  Avatar's from this forum.

Back on topic...I tried starter strips last year...I had a couple of those fall out and a couple bow.  I know the bowing was more heat related than anything.  The strips falling out...my bad.   shocked
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CWBees
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« Reply #8 on: August 10, 2007, 12:39:36 PM »

I have had problems with warped foundation that used the pins after it sat a while before I used it. I ended up using some of it for starter strips in my mating nucs.
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kathyp
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« Reply #9 on: August 10, 2007, 12:46:23 PM »

i think the trick with the wax is to get the wedge piece in really tight, stabilize it with side pins, and hang it right away.  i did some with and some without the pins.  i found it held up better with the pins and once the bees had drawn comb to the edges, nothing was going to move it.

this year, i bought unwired and did starter strips.  saved a lot of money and seemed to work really well.
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.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

 Alexis de Tocqueville
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« Reply #10 on: August 10, 2007, 01:38:37 PM »

i think the trick with the wax is to get the wedge piece in really tight, stabilize it with side pins, and hang it right away.  i did some with and some without the pins.  i found it held up better with the pins and once the bees had drawn comb to the edges, nothing was going to move it.

And there needs to be a flow.  If they aren't geared to build comb,  they will just chew it through.
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afretired
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« Reply #11 on: August 10, 2007, 10:32:35 PM »

Kathyp
When you use just starter strips do you use the wire in the frames and let the bees build the comb around the wire?

Dave
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