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Author Topic: Flow ~> *Accelerating* (image intensive thread)  (Read 13408 times)
Dane Bramage
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« Reply #80 on: August 22, 2007, 01:46:56 AM »

Lets take a stroll into the wetlands, Aug 21, 2007.

<a href="http://i14.tinypic.com/508jxc7.jpg" target="_blank">" border="0" height="" width="[/url]
Just entering and looking back, the purple loosestrife is still very much in bloom, willows are behind.  Further behind still and up to the hill left is home.  The apiary is to the right.

<a href="http://i18.tinypic.com/6bteyxg.jpg" target="_blank">" border="0" height="" width="[/url]
Down a little further North, around a huge bunch of blackberries we can see the creek.

<a href="http://i15.tinypic.com/5xzcnbn.jpg" target="_blank">" border="0" height="" width="[/url]
Follow it a little further upstream

<a href="http://i10.tinypic.com/63w2hhg.jpg" target="_blank">" border="0" height="" width="[/url]
The creek bends to the East and continues on, but we'll stop here.

<a href="http://i14.tinypic.com/53rbih2.jpg" target="_blank">" border="0" height="" width="[/url]
The view to the West.

So thats a bit of an overview.  Now it's time for a closer look at some of whats currently flowering.

Some sort of aster?
<a href="http://i10.tinypic.com/4yzixqs.jpg" target="_blank">" border="0" height="" width="[/url]<a href="http://i15.tinypic.com/6h6hm5w.jpg" target="_blank">" border="0" height="" width="[/url]

No idea on these, but the bees do seem to be loving them!
<a href="http://i11.tinypic.com/5y2nygo.jpg" target="_blank">" border="0" height="" width="[/url]<a href="http://i11.tinypic.com/4yj8hi0.jpg" target="_blank">" border="0" height="" width="[/url]<a href="http://i11.tinypic.com/4zjjfhd.jpg" target="_blank">" border="0" height="" width="[/url]

Unknown bunch of yellow flowers
<a href="http://i19.tinypic.com/5ytsdqb.jpg" target="_blank">" border="0" height="" width="[/url]

Interesting clover, always popular with the bees.
<a href="http://i14.tinypic.com/5x6myr6.jpg" target="_blank">" border="0" height="" width="[/url]<a href="http://i10.tinypic.com/6cgmurq.jpg" target="_blank">" border="0" height="" width="[/url]
They were also foraging the white dutch clover that I found blooming close to the ground.

Here's what I'm guessing is that "cow's parsnip".
<a href="http://i16.tinypic.com/6fi31op.jpg" target="_blank">" border="0" height="" width="[/url]

There were some of these pretty fuschia ones that are popular with the bumblers.
<a href="http://i13.tinypic.com/52x8faq.jpg" target="_blank">" border="0" height="" width="[/url]

Whew.. that's about it for now.  My assistant and I need a rest.  Wink
<a href="http://i11.tinypic.com/62fpvh2.jpg" target="_blank">" border="0" height="" width="[/url]<a href="http://i19.tinypic.com/4l599hj.jpg" target="_blank">" border="0" height="" width="[/url]

I'll post some macro images of the pollen being collected now.  It is almost all light and bright - oranges, yellows and tans.  Sweet and yummy!!

Cheers,
Dane
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mgmoore7
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« Reply #81 on: August 22, 2007, 09:10:54 AM »

Great Pictures Dane
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Cindi
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« Reply #82 on: August 22, 2007, 11:40:29 AM »

Dane, your thread is growing leaps and bounds!!!  Look at what you have created  Wink

Beautiful pictures, that stroll through the wetlands was wonderful, wish I could be there to see it, beautiful for surely.

Vista.  Ah, Vista.  What can you do?  (probably lots if you go something different I guess).  Dane I remember your comment about Vista, I listened, but nothing I could do about it.  But Windows XP is not available here any longer when you purchase a new laptop, it is all Vista.  According to Microsoft, XP is going, going, gone by the end of this year, unavailable, completely.  Oh brother.  Vista is a weird one, so completely different than XP I was running for so long.  I don't like alot of the actions, stuff, but then holy crow!!!  The pictures that I have downloaded yesterday onto my laptop.  I have never even thought that crystal clarity could be so clear.  I see things in the pictures that I can't even see in the real life.  Oops.  Off topic.  Have a wonderful day, beautiful, beautiful life.  Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
Dane Bramage
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« Reply #83 on: August 23, 2007, 01:05:34 AM »

Thank you both kindly.  Smiley

Anyone have any ID on the unknown flowers?  I'm at a bit of a loss on them.. especially curious about this one:
<a href="http://i11.tinypic.com/4zjjfhd.jpg" target="_blank">" border="0" height="" width="[/url] (loads of them and seemingly good nectar producers atm)

TIA,
Dane
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Brian D. Bray
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« Reply #84 on: August 23, 2007, 10:48:39 PM »

Definitely a legume of the pea or bean varity by the leaf and flower configuration.  Vetch looks like that but with a purple flower, edible peas have a white flower, and sweat peas have various colors on the same vine.  It might be milo, a small pea type grain used in pigeon feed amoung others.  Post a picture after the seed pods have developed.  I remembering seeing it a lot back when I was a kid on the farm but that was over 50 years ago and my memory grows dim.
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #85 on: August 24, 2007, 07:13:39 AM »

>Anyone have any ID on the unknown flowers?

Looks like birdsfoot trefoil from what I can see.
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Dane Bramage
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« Reply #86 on: August 24, 2007, 10:32:34 AM »

Hey, looks like you're both correct: birdsfoot trefoil, a legume.  Thank you very much!

I found one place that offers birdsfoot trefoil honey (Ames Farm).  It is reportedly very good.

"Birdsfoot trefoil: very light amber, strong quintessential honey aroma, sweet flavor with a hint of detergent, slight medicinal after taste."

So I think my fall nectar flow/honey is mostly purple loosestrife, birdsfoot trefoil, aster, goldenrod, and clover (best guess at diminishing order).  Though the Jasmine, butterfly bush, mimosa, rose of sharon, etc., etc., are still blooming, though definitely past their peaks.
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« Reply #87 on: August 24, 2007, 11:07:47 AM »

i see bumbles, butterflies, and hummers on my rose of sharon but no honeys. didn't last year either.
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Dane Bramage
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« Reply #88 on: September 01, 2007, 05:51:05 PM »

i see bumbles, butterflies, and hummers on my rose of sharon but no honeys. didn't last year either.


I guess my bees are both ravenous and promiscuous.   Wink

I've been busy (harvesting honey, blackberries, "day job", etc.,) but thought I'd post a little update here with some images contrasting the three distinct honey-types harvested thus far this year. 
<a href="http://i6.tinypic.com/4r71ldy.jpg" target="_blank">[/url]
I've categorized them, from right to left, as July (Blackberry), August (Wildflower Light) & September (Wildflower Amber) harvest honeys.

I came up with a name for the apiary, designed logo and labels since last post.  I decided to put "Oregon Wetlands" on the label after all.  I previously had thought to not (since the bees do in fact forage all over) but I think even when naming varietals (nectar source) honey the convention seems to be a generalization, with the primary/majority nectar source being named.  The bees are predominately foraging the wetlands so I thought it helpful and not inappropriate to use that in the name (I like the way it sounds too).  Oh well.. a name's a name & "Would not this honey by any other name taste as sweet?"  Wink

The previous image was side lit.  Here's one with the sun shining through, backlit:
<a href="http://i8.tinypic.com/4pdlz82.jpg" target="_blank">[/url]

& one last of the very light (almost watercoloured) August Wildflower honey:
<a href="http://i4.tinypic.com/52zlqvc.jpg" target="_blank">[/url]

I plan to take some macro images of the pollen collected and match that up with their respective honeys.  Next time.  cool

Hope everyone's well and having an excellent harvest season.. or Spring, if you're down under.  grin

Cheers,
Dane
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annette
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« Reply #89 on: September 01, 2007, 11:08:56 PM »

Dane

I absolutely love your labels. Did you do this at home on your computer??? Are they water resistant???

The honey's look beautiful all different colors like that. I guess those wetlands are a paradise for bees.

You seem to be having so much fun.

Take care
Annette
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Cindi
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« Reply #90 on: September 02, 2007, 11:27:45 AM »

Go Dane Go!!!!  Yeah!!!!  Love your name.  Now, when I see Oregon Wetlands on the shelf in my health food store, I can put a face to the honey and know where it came from  Smiley  Just kidding.  All seriousness put aside.  You have done well this year with your girls and the harvest, yeah!!!!  I still read in awe when you tell us about your nectar/pollen experiences with your girls.  You certainly live in a paradise for the bees.  Yeah!!!!

Those pictures of the honeys were lovely, you should be proud.

I still have a strong nectar flow going on here too.  The bees are very strong and going strong.  What I have blooming en masse here right now is:

Anise Hyssop (perennial) (grown from cuttings this spring)
Anise hyssop (Agastache anisata) Licorice Mint Blue (annual, I think, I grew from seed)
Myriads of broccoli that I let go to flower this year because of such stressed out plants, no good for broccoli harvesting
Canary creeper vines (everywhere)
Heliotrope -- Marine cultivar
Impatiens capensis
Sea Holly (Eryngium planum) )(covered with bees and beneficials, beyond amazing)
Borage (new plants have self-seeded all summer, many still setting their blooms now)
Phacelia Tanacetifolia (new plants have self-seeded all summer, many just setting their blooms now too)
Bachelors buttons (blue cornflower)
Perennial asters that are just coming into bloom
Lobelia (crystal palace) (bees love it)
Nictotiannas (Sensation Mix, blooms stay open during the day), covered in bees
Many other annuals the bees enjoy too

That is basically what I can think of what is here for bee forage that I cultivate, other plants that I have had growing have past their time and have been cut back.  All the above plants are still blooming strong and will be until at least middle of October.

One that I found the bees really really loved was the Figwort, that was covered in bees too, but only bloomed for about 3 weeks.  So, I am pretty sure that my bees will have plenty of food for the wintertime, I will be starting to feed a little 2:1 s.s. soon, just to ensure high food stores, if they don't need it, they won't use it, but best "be prepared".  Have a wonderful day, best of this beautiful life.  Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
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« Reply #91 on: September 02, 2007, 11:46:03 AM »

Oops, forgot probably one of the most prolific of annuals right now, the Sunflowers, everywhere, self-seeded ones from last year and mountains that I have plant everywhere in groves.  The bees go nuts on them too!!!!  Covered in yellow pollen from head to toe!!!  Best of this beautiful day.  Cindi



And then the bombus, they loved the Fuller's Teasel, as much as the bees, such a beautiful plant, stood over 12 feet tall, but back the main flowers and it is in full blooming again.  Amazing plant, and the dried flowers are a striking inside plant arrangement, all on their own.



Beautiful day, Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
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« Reply #92 on: September 02, 2007, 03:24:27 PM »

Cindi

Your home must also be a paradise for bees!!! Beautiful photos of those sunflowers and others. Thanks for sharing all this good info on what the bees love.

Have a great day
Annette
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Dane Bramage
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« Reply #93 on: September 02, 2007, 04:58:25 PM »

Thanks Annette!  I did design the labels myself (except the Archangel Apiaries logo, had help w/that) on my computer.  Here's a better image of one ~> <a href="http://i18.tinypic.com/2nixn5d.jpg" target="_blank">[/url]
This first batch I just printed off on label stock from my printer.  They're not waterproof.  I really wasn't expecting any surplus this year so... I'm a bit behind the 'game', as it were.  I'm going to get some type of more appropriate labels made up soon.
Definitely having fun.  Really fascinating stuff and I guess my little corner of the world is indeed quite conducive to honey production.   cool

Thanks Cindi! Glad you like the name of these honeys.  Maybe later, when/if I expand, I'll have some other area honeys.  Yeah - look for the angel bee in a store near you! ~>    grin

Wow!  I need to make a nectar list as well.  Yours looks awesome!  Plenty of room on those big sunflowers!  I still have a lot of what I posted much earlier on this thread blooming; lavender mint (I'm going to clone/propagate this one) & Mimosa still strong, butterfly bush, rose of sharon and Jasmine starting to finish.  I think the goldenrod, birdsfoot trefoil, purple loosestrife and aster are the major producers at the moment.

Hope the season finishes up strongly for you!

Cheers,
Dane
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« Reply #94 on: September 02, 2007, 05:01:37 PM »

your lable is very nice, but you know the only difference between a swamp and a wetland is land use laws   evil  how about oregon swamp honeyHuh??
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.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

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Dane Bramage
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« Reply #95 on: September 02, 2007, 05:12:35 PM »

your lable is very nice, but you know the only difference between a swamp and a wetland is land use laws   evil  how about oregon swamp honeyHuh??

Use laws dictate the definition?  huh  I had thought it was physical characteristics that defined if a wetland's type was a swamp, marsh, moor, bog, bayou, etc., etc.,.  And, seeing as how a swamp is a type of wetland, I should be all good with the legalese.  ha!  cheesy  "Oregon swamp honey" just doesn't have a good ring to it.  I do like the Florida Swamp honey though = Tupelo!  grin  So how many quarts can I put you down for Kathy?  Wink
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« Reply #96 on: September 02, 2007, 05:26:27 PM »

Quote
So how many quarts can I put you down for Kathy? 


thats it.  rub it in.....  i have some left from last year, thank you.
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.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

 Alexis de Tocqueville
Dane Bramage
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« Reply #97 on: September 02, 2007, 05:34:08 PM »

thats it.  rub it in.....  i have some left from last year, thank you.

hahaha - nahhh, I just thought you were lusting after the swamp honey.   afro 
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annette
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« Reply #98 on: September 02, 2007, 07:29:06 PM »

I'm lusting after your label. Where do you plan on getting these made up into waterproof labels??? Let me know how and where you do this. I have found it to be so expensive everywhere I looked.

Thanks
Annette
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Cindi
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« Reply #99 on: September 03, 2007, 01:59:19 AM »

Dane, OK, I think that Oregon Wetlands is the name that you should go for.  It has a beautiful connotation, depicts entirely where you live, moisture -- nectar -- that is what makes lots of honey.  I am sure that dry areas provide honey, but, holy crocadoolal, nectar from wetlands!!!!!  I still think that I want to sample your honies, let's try and figure out a very economical way of getting it to my place.  I would be your first taster, tester -- and honesty you would receive.

I have worked really hard today to get my apiary cleaned up, (with the intention of installing the 72 hour sticky boards for mite control) (this did not happen, by the way, it took too long to make the apiary user-friendly, the area (only several inches) infront of the colonies cleaned of grass, and all the areas beside, and then mowed.  It helps to keep my feet drier in ths wet climate.  No gumboots yet... only a few stings when I grabbed some grass that had the older bees giving up their lives. I know that by the whollop of the sting that they gave to me.  About 5 on my fingers, only one on my bicep.  That one really stung hard, no swelling, no reaction, only that burning glow that is the true sign that you had a poor little girl give up her life, thinking that you were doing harm.  Little did she know,I meant no harm.  The girls that buzzed around, trying to find out the intruder.  I fooled them, when I heard them coming on hard with their buzz, I moved narry a motion, I waited until they had gone on their merry way, still searching for this intruder, and then I began again, pulling out the grass that I know would make my life so much easier when working their hives. If only they knew, my intentions were good.  Cleaning the grass short is not only to my advantage.  Watch the bees when they come in for a landing, laden with nectar or pollen, or both, they often miss, they land in the grass, try to climb up the grass shoots, to get home.  When I clear the longer grasses, their journey is shortened, they don't have to climb mountains to get to where they are going, they simply regain their strength -- upward they go, home.  The wonderful world of our girls, the honeybee.  Have a wonderful day, best of this wonderful life we are livin'.  Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
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