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Author Topic: hay prices  (Read 5457 times)

Online kathyp

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Re: hay prices
« Reply #20 on: October 24, 2007, 02:34:48 PM »
just drove over to idaho and back.  lots of hay trucks and lots of onions  :-).  i'd rather be behind a hay truck.  good looking stuff coming out of eastern wa and idaho.  much better prices!!
.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

 Alexis de Tocqueville

Offline Zoot

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Re: hay prices
« Reply #21 on: October 26, 2007, 06:08:40 PM »
We paid $175 per 1 ton squares in Sept and it is excellent - imported from Oklahoma. We didn't get much from the cuttings here in MD this year which was unfortunate as the local grass is excellent when it rains. It's now up as high as 250. $3.00 bales are available if you don't mind the beer cans and weeds mixed in. Same goes for the $10.00 bales.

Offline Cindi

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Re: hay prices
« Reply #22 on: October 27, 2007, 01:04:48 PM »
Oh I don't miss those days when we would have to haul hay for our horses.  That was one part I couldn't stand.  That was about 7 years ago, I venture.

We always got our hay from a local farmer, it was heavy bales, high protein, excellent, in those days we paid $3.50 a bale, the horses did well on it.  Never fed alfalfa or timothy, that was available too, but that was a nice hay when they were mixed I hear.  Have a wonderful day, best of this great life.  Cindi
There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service

Offline Mici

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Re: hay prices
« Reply #23 on: October 28, 2007, 04:46:33 PM »
when talking about bales, square ones, you mean the little ones?:
http://www.homestead-farm.net/art/kidsArt/hay-j/Stacked-HayStraw.jpg
jesus...here they're almost for  free, 2€=3$ (aprox)

Online kathyp

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Re: hay prices
« Reply #24 on: October 28, 2007, 08:02:50 PM »
my bales are about 110 lbs.  about 50 kg?  some bales done for shipping are 1 ton bales (2000 lbs) and then there are round bales which i believe are about 1 ton also.  i use the smaller bales for the horses.  large bales would spoil in our wet climate.  because so much of the hay from oregon is exported, our local prices have gone up.  also, some hay farmers have taken to planting corn in the hope of getting in on the bio-fuel craze.  so far, they have made some money and we have paid much more for groceries and animal feed.  never mind that the bio-fuel is more expensive and new reports are having it causing more pollution than regular fuel  :-).

can't blame the farmers for trying to make a bit more money.  it is probably a temporary gain.
.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

 Alexis de Tocqueville

Offline abejaruco

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Re: hay prices
« Reply #25 on: October 29, 2007, 09:27:57 PM »
Temporary?
The biofuel craze is so temporary as the Algore one.
I thought that Algore could not sell a comb, and you see, Nobel.

By the way, Chineses are learning to eat. So, we have biofuel and Chinese craze.

Offline Carriage House Farm

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Re: hay prices
« Reply #26 on: October 29, 2007, 09:41:01 PM »
The fact that it is unsustainable makes it temporary.
Richard Stewart
Carriage House Farm
North Bend, Ohio

An Ohio Century Farm

Online kathyp

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Re: hay prices
« Reply #27 on: October 29, 2007, 11:08:34 PM »
can't explain algore.  of course, i can't explain hillary, or many other things  :-).  sometimes sh** happens........
.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

 Alexis de Tocqueville

Offline Cindi

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Re: hay prices
« Reply #28 on: October 29, 2007, 11:56:31 PM »
This was kind of interesting.  There was a period of time when we were having hay delivered.  It was awesome hay, it was extremely compressed.  The bales were about 1/2 the size of a typical 80-90 pound bale.  But, let me tell you it was deceiving!!!!!  Beyond what you could ever imagine.  These bales were in the proximity of about 150 pounds.  I recall trying to lift one once, and caught myself laughing my guts out.  I called my oldest gal, who at that time still lived on our property.  She is a lean, mean, machine, and still is to this day.  I told her to try and lift this bale up.  By gads!!!!!!  She tried and she tried, and she couldn't do it.  Me standing there, watching her, holding that inner laughter inside.  She asked me if I could lift it.......challenging me....and I told her that I thought she was nuts!!!  Nope, it was so small, so compact, you could not have even a chance of getting a grip.  The hay hooks were the only way to even begin to move this loaf, unless it was rolled....but then, try and roll and hunk of hay that is so heavy....it was certainly a great space saver.  In winters to pass, I wished that we still could have obtained that tiny, compressed bale of heavy hay, but no so, never had the chance again.  Oh well...have a wonderful day, enjoy our lives we live.  Cindi
There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service

 

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