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Author Topic: Swarm pictures.  (Read 4666 times)
Anonymous
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« on: July 04, 2004, 11:37:28 AM »

Pictures of a swarm I helped Bob with. Excuse the pictures they were taken with film and scanned. I'llfigure out a way to crop the unused stuff latter.

Twenty feet or there abouts in a oak tree.





Moving into the deep with frames of drawn comb sprayed with honey. About half are still on the limb. They have made 9 frames of cut comb honey in 3 weeks.





 Cheesy Al
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Anonymous
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« Reply #1 on: July 04, 2004, 11:46:10 AM »

Bob's bee yard June the 12th.



Bob's bee yard Jume 18th. Note the bearding.



About a hour latter after the above picture was taken.



The tub is full of gravel andf water. It is the bees water sourse.
Bob was able to draw them into a new deep hive.
 


 Cheesy Al
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Anonymous
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« Reply #2 on: July 04, 2004, 11:49:18 AM »

A swarm Bob captured on the 28th of June. He had forgot he had the camera in his pick up till the last miniute.



 Cheesy Al
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buzz
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« Reply #3 on: July 04, 2004, 01:43:02 PM »

Great pictures! What did you use to get it down from 20 feet?
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Scott
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"If you have no money and you have few possessions, if you have a dog you are still rich"
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Anonymous
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« Reply #4 on: July 05, 2004, 09:36:08 AM »

We used an extention pole with a clamp mounted on one end where we used a couple of different hooks to get ropes over the branch without stirring the bees up. Once we had the rope fastened to the limb the bees were on we ran it over a limb above them then I held the rope while Bob sawed the limb off with his extention pole pruning saw enought to allow the limb to swing down. Then we took a break to allow the bees to settle down again from the swing. Then Bob finished sawing the branch off, installed a different hook to the pole, hooked the branch pulling it away from the ones below it as I played out the rope lowering it to the waiting hive body.

 Cheesy Al
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Agility Mom
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« Reply #5 on: July 05, 2004, 09:29:33 PM »

I'm begining to get the picture now. Pretty ingenious. What kind of hooks are you using to get the rope over the limbs? How do you tighten the clamp?
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Judy
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« Reply #6 on: July 05, 2004, 10:25:09 PM »

The hooks are fashioned from 1/4 inch mild steel round stock. For lifting the rope over the limb the hook looks like an upside down J with a right side up J welded to it. Imagian a J then a upside down one welded to the bottom part. I forgot to say that the rope does have a weight tied on to help pull it down once it is over the limb.
The hook to pull the limb away from the lower branchs is juat a J made the same as above.
The clamp is one of those big steel spring clamps sold at Lowe's and used mostly by wood workers to clamp glue joints together. So each time you want to change a hook you have to bring the pole down anyway so a quick squeese does the trick.
 Cheesy Al
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Agility Mom
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« Reply #7 on: July 06, 2004, 09:23:27 AM »

Thanks, Al. I find this swarm catching fascinating. Wish I lived closer to Michigan so I could tag along to see you guys work.

I'm going to show your answer and other descriptions to my husband. Maybe we can rig something up, too, to get any high swarms  we have.
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Judy
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« Reply #8 on: January 30, 2006, 02:31:32 AM »

Loved the pics Bob. I counted 14 hives in one of those pics in to me what seems a small space but I know nothing. Its cool how they all get along and know where to go etc.

If I ever win the lottery I reckon Ill get into honey full time, lots of sitting around and watching sounds good to me.
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akarlovic
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« Reply #9 on: October 24, 2006, 07:30:34 AM »






more...
http://www.pcelarstvo.hr/index.php?option=com_zoom&Itemid=71&catid=5&PageNo=1
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buzzbeejr
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« Reply #10 on: November 12, 2006, 10:13:54 AM »

thats a lot of bees and beehives!!!! shocked
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mick
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« Reply #11 on: November 24, 2006, 03:38:31 AM »

I love swarm pics, I have my open for one!
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Kirk-o
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« Reply #12 on: January 14, 2007, 06:48:11 PM »

It looks like you know what you are doing
kirko
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"It's not about Honey it's not about Money It's about SURVIVAL" Charles Martin Simmon
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