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Author Topic: division board feeders  (Read 2004 times)
randydrivesabus
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« on: October 02, 2007, 01:39:52 PM »

i hefted (is there such a word?) my 4 hives and 2 are heavy and 2 are light. i'm thinking of using a division board feeder to get them up to winter weight.....i would use the inverted jar method but i don't have sufficient hive bodies now to cover the jar with. anyone have any criticism of division board feeders?

now i was looking at the bee supply catalog and saw a baggie feeder they sell that i could easily build myself. anyone have experience with baggie feeding?
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #1 on: October 02, 2007, 06:46:13 PM »

>now i was looking at the bee supply catalog and saw a baggie feeder they sell that i could easily build myself. anyone have experience with baggie feeding?

They work great.  Just don't fill the baggie too full and don't cut too many slits.

http://www.beesource.com/eob/baggie.htm
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Michael Bush
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doak
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« Reply #2 on: October 02, 2007, 10:21:00 PM »

The Division board feeder is the only feeder I use at the time. I may try some hive top feeders thin spring.
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TwT
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« Reply #3 on: October 02, 2007, 10:48:43 PM »

I mostly use hivetop feeders, I have used the baggie feeder a few times and had good luck every time, they work fine, the advantage with a hive top feeder is you can open the hive and pore in feed and bee's not mess with you or you bothering them.
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randydrivesabus
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« Reply #4 on: October 03, 2007, 06:04:15 AM »

I mostly use hivetop feeders, I have used the baggie feeder a few times and had good luck every time, they work fine, the advantage with a hive top feeder is you can open the hive and pore in feed and bee's not mess with you or you bothering them.
you'd think they'd be more appreciative.
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TwT
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« Reply #5 on: October 03, 2007, 06:20:09 AM »

you'd think they'd be more appreciative.

yeah i know it, but they are gals so you never know what mood they will be in  shocked Wink grin evil
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« Reply #6 on: October 03, 2007, 07:30:40 AM »

now i was looking at the bee supply catalog and saw a baggie feeder they sell that i could easily build myself.


If you can build one of these, you can just build a box for around the inverted jar tongue

Here are my views on feeders. -> http://robo.bushkillfarms.com/beekeeping/feeder-compare/
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randydrivesabus
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« Reply #7 on: October 03, 2007, 08:44:40 AM »

now i was looking at the bee supply catalog and saw a baggie feeder they sell that i could easily build myself.


If you can build one of these, you can just build a box for around the inverted jar tongue

Here are my views on feeders. -> http://robo.bushkillfarms.com/beekeeping/feeder-compare/


except that i would have to drive 45 minutes one way to buy the lumber to make a box.....the other i can make out of scraps on hand.
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Cindi
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« Reply #8 on: October 03, 2007, 10:05:39 AM »

Oh brother, I tried to zip loc baggie feeder last spring, it worked great!!!  Except.  My husband had built me a little mini super about 2 inches tall (does this have a name?).  The bees loved the sugar and drank it all up, smile, but they at the same time built a whole bunch of comb from the inner cover down to the top of the frames, what a mess!!!!  When I lifted off the inner cover, there were all the combs just a hangin' down!!!!   :roll:Must have done something wrong with the design!!!!  Have a wonderful day, greatest of this life.  Cindi
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randydrivesabus
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« Reply #9 on: October 03, 2007, 10:47:39 AM »

i just built what you describe Cindi. its called a baggie feeder. i think if i put 2 gallon size bags in there with 6 pints of syrup each there will not be much room for comb until the bags get empty. and if they build i will destroy.
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Cindi
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« Reply #10 on: October 04, 2007, 12:41:23 AM »

Randydrivesabus.  Just wait and see, I would be very curious about your results.  I am sure the bees are not too big on building comb this time of year, so maybe things will be a little more under control  Smiley  What my bees did really bugged the:  out of me.  Have a wonderful day, tell us one day of things that you may see.  Have a great day, best of health, this winter comin' on.  Cindi
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« Reply #11 on: October 04, 2007, 06:32:52 PM »

Cindi asks >> My husband had built me a little mini super about 2 inches tall (does this have a name?).

Yes, it is called a shim; an Imrie shim is one with an entrance notch cut in 1 side of 1 end.

randythebusdriver >> i think if i put 2 gallon size bags in there with 6 pints of syrup each there will not be much room for comb until the bags get empty. and if they build i will destroy.

Why? I always leave any post harvest burr comb through the winter and cut it out in the spring.  In the fall they need all the extra storage space for winter they can get, cutting the burr comb out in the will help stimulate comb building.  I think we should work work with our bees not against them.
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randydrivesabus
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« Reply #12 on: October 04, 2007, 07:32:58 PM »


randythebusdriver >> i think if i put 2 gallon size bags in there with 6 pints of syrup each there will not be much room for comb until the bags get empty. and if they build i will destroy.

Why? I always leave any post harvest burr comb through the winter and cut it out in the spring.  In the fall they need all the extra storage space for winter they can get, cutting the burr comb out in the will help stimulate comb building.  I think we should work work with our bees not against them.
because it will get in the way of putting in another round of bags. if i stop feeding i will remove the baggie feeder.
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