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Author Topic: No treatment  (Read 1368 times)
doak
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Location: Central Ga. 35 miles north of Macon


« on: June 16, 2007, 01:21:40 AM »

As some of you may remember, I had treated for mites and hive beetles last fall. Five of the seven hives I lost had been treated. I haven't used anything sence and all my colonies are healthy looking and very active. Except for the one that didn't do much last year and superceded twice this spring. One of the two I requeened. In less than a week after requeening it and the one that was left queenless from swarming, they both look 50% better already.
I don't plan on going into them for another week or two to see how the queens are doing. when I do I'll give an update.
I am getting ready to take mine down to fall configuration around the first of July. But if we have enough  rain from now till September I may look at putting another super on if they fill the two brood chambers up. July will be when the Kudzu blooms anyhow, and I want to see if I can get some of it without much else in it.
I don't know how the queens operate up north, but you southeast Keepers remember, Summer soltice is in a few days and the queen will gradully taper off on laying.  Swarming will be less likely and brood space shouldn't have to be increased any more.
Guess I'm just rambling Smiley
doaaak
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Kirk-o
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« Reply #1 on: June 16, 2007, 09:15:19 AM »

Well it sounds like you are headed in the right direction.I don't treat either
good luck
kirko
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"It's not about Honey it's not about Money It's about SURVIVAL" Charles Martin Simmon
Cindi
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« Reply #2 on: June 16, 2007, 11:25:57 PM »

Doak, yes summer solstace soon.  The days begin to shorten, imagine that eh?

Up in this northern hemisphere, we are now in full flow in the blackberry bloom.  Our honeyflow will continue around into the middle of July for the commercial beekeepers and then they get ready for the pumpkin pollinations. 

At my home, this may sound really weird, but the flow will continue on for a long time yet.  The phacelias, borages, bachelors buttons and the myriads of ornamental flowers, flowering shrubs and so many perennials are coming into their splendor.  All the garden foods that I allow to go to flower for the bees carry on long into late summer as well.  The broccoli is one that the bees go simply crazy on.  The parsley is setting flower soon too, last years plants.  They got nuts on this for a long time too.  The sunflowers will be blooming in about two weeks and will continue on deep into fall as well, I have many varieties, that keeps the blooms going and going and going.  The bees are in nectar flow here with absolutely no dearth.  The clovers are in full blooming now.  The Canary Creeper vines are about 8 feet tall now, and beginning to set blooms, they flower all summer long until frost kill too.

The Annise Hyssops will be coming into bloom around the middle of July.  That in itself is a honeyflow. I have about 40 perennial hyssop that will bloom and probably 100 annual hyssop thast will be in full bloom too.  Covered in bees from morning to night.  At my home I can still be taking off honey the beginning of September and still feel comfortable that there are enough fall flowers still blooming and producing nourishment for the bees to ready them for winter.  Just a little story of my property and the food for the bees.  Have a wonderful day, Cindi.
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
doak
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« Reply #3 on: June 16, 2007, 11:39:40 PM »

From the sound of things, I hope you have plenty of ready  supers. I am going to see if I can get some of those plants started om my sted.
doak
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Cindi
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« Reply #4 on: June 16, 2007, 11:45:46 PM »

Doak, as far as I know, all these plants that I grow will flourish practically anywhere.  I don't know why people don't plant these en masse if they have their bees on their property.  My list is extensive of bee plants, there are many, many more that I have not even talked about recently.  I have seen the results of nectar flow without derth for two years now until frost kill in the beginning of October to the middle of October, it just keeps going and going and going.

I read in an old book, really old, probably called the "Spell of the Honeybee", the author (and this was way back when), said that if every one would plant borage, there would be myriads of nectar for bees all around.  Hmm....he must have known something.

It is said that borage comes into full bloom as the clover fails.  I think that this is correct.  My borage will be in full flower within about 2 weeks time, the main bud is ready to explode.  The clover has been blooming for a short time now and its end will overlap with borage.  Have a wonderful day.  Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
Michael Bush
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« Reply #5 on: June 17, 2007, 12:58:21 PM »

Your last treatment was last fall.  Are you doing anything to control the mites, like small cell?  Are you monitoring the mites at all, like sugar shakes or natural drop counts?  I wouldn't stop monitoring until you've had really low counts for a few years. Keep an eye on uncapped drone brood as well.
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Michael Bush
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"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
doak
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Location: Central Ga. 35 miles north of Macon


« Reply #6 on: June 17, 2007, 01:21:54 PM »

I haven't seen any mites at all this year, even in the 5 hives I didn't treat, of course they were the only ones I had  left. I haven't done a sugar shake but tore up a lot of drone comb the first time I took mine apart all the way to the bottom board for the spring inspection. Didn't see any mites on the drone brood.

Once I start adding honey supers I don't go back into the brood till after I have got what honey I am taking,
Unless it is for something like I had with the two queenless colonies.
Haven't started drone foundation yet. I plan on starting it and starter strips as soon as possible.
I know it sounds like I'm dragging my feet, But I wasn't into the kind of bee keeping That this forum is all about.
I feel like I have  found the MOTHER load in this forum. Wink
doak
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