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 61 
 on: September 29, 2014, 03:52:19 PM 
Started by GSF - Last post by Rurification
I got pinged on the forearm a few days ago.  I felt her land and looked down in time to see her get me.    Usually I get a little swelling and some itching.   This time, The swelling was 5 inches across with a little puss pocket in the center. That lasted for 3 days.  I still have a hard spot right where she got me.   I figured it was some sort of pollen that didn't agree with me.  We've still got a lot of late summer stuff blooming. [No cotton this far north.]  That's just my guess, though.   I'm kind of relieved to know that my experience isn't totally unique.

 62 
 on: September 29, 2014, 03:11:48 PM 
Started by GSF - Last post by Steel Tiger
 Several weeks ago, I received about a dozen stings at once. A few just gave a burning sensation for several hours, some welted and swelled a bit and one really swelled up and almost made my forearm look like Popeye's arm. All the bees came from the same hive. I guess it's what part of the body is stung and possibly what bee stung you. Perhaps a guard bee has a bit more potent sting than a gatherer.

 63 
 on: September 29, 2014, 02:27:58 PM 
Started by Candiebears - Last post by beeman2009
Candi,

Unfortunately if you have bees, you have varroa. They effect some hives more than others depending on the bees tolerance/resistance to the mites. They can kill a hive pretty quickly if they become a problem. Need to do regular mite counts if you see signs  of things like sluggish bees walking around instead of flying, DFW ( Deformed Wing). Personally I don't like to treat but this year I had no choice. I'm not going to stand buy & watch my bees die if I can treat the problem with something natural. I hope I don't have to treat anymore. I've kept small cell bees since 2008 and never seen any problems until now.  Hope this helps you until someone with more experience chimes in.

 64 
 on: September 29, 2014, 01:20:37 PM 
Started by Candiebears - Last post by Candiebears
I'm new here and I did search.. But I'm a little confused are Varroas in EVERY hive? And is the treatment proactive or reactive?

This whole varroa thing has me confused. And I'd like to fully understand it, before I start in the spring?

Any help is great! And I thank you in advance! :

 65 
 on: September 29, 2014, 11:33:26 AM 
Started by GSF - Last post by sawdstmakr
I agree, the old timers probably noticed that when the bees were working cotton that the stings were worse. There is probably something that they get from the cotton to affect the stings.
Jim

 66 
 on: September 29, 2014, 11:24:34 AM 
Started by sawdstmakr - Last post by sawdstmakr
Build a beevac-life is much easyer -RDY-B

Actually I have 2. I just did not have one on site.
Jim

 67 
 on: September 29, 2014, 11:23:17 AM 
Started by davidawbrown - Last post by sawdstmakr
Wax dipping:
http://www.apiculture.co.za/cgi-bin/books-read.pl?s=9.%20Hot%20wax%20dipping%20for%20sterilisation&book=hotwax-db.txt

They have been making foundation out of beeswax sent to the bee supply houses with no guarantee the was is free of AFB, for more than a century now... I have never heard of any issues from that.  I've always assumed they used steam to get the wax hot enough to kill the spores.  But encapsulation may also be part of the mechanism.


Thanks Mike.
One thing I would like to correct in this article is the temperature. They say the wax needs to be between 150-160 degrees Celsius. 150 degrees Celsius = 302 degrees Fahrenheit. If someone tries to get their wax to that temperature it will probably ignite.  The melting point of beeswax varies slightly and is between 62 and 64C (144 to 147F). So they probably meant 150-160 degrees Fahrenheit.
Jim


 68 
 on: September 29, 2014, 11:19:28 AM 
Started by GSF - Last post by Hops Brewster
"cotton poison", eh?  Old timers might not be talking about sprayed pesticides on the cotton, but maybe some compound in the cotton pollen that contributes to the sting irritation.

Take what I say with a grain of salt though.  All I know about cotton is what I'm wearing today.  rolleyes

 69 
 on: September 29, 2014, 10:53:55 AM 
Started by davidawbrown - Last post by Michael Bush
Wax dipping:
http://www.apiculture.co.za/cgi-bin/books-read.pl?s=9.%20Hot%20wax%20dipping%20for%20sterilisation&book=hotwax-db.txt

They have been making foundation out of beeswax sent to the bee supply houses with no guarantee the was is free of AFB, for more than a century now... I have never heard of any issues from that.  I've always assumed they used steam to get the wax hot enough to kill the spores.  But encapsulation may also be part of the mechanism.

 70 
 on: September 29, 2014, 10:53:37 AM 
Started by lizzydog - Last post by iddee
I think the thread title is weak HIVE, not nuc.

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