Welcome, Guest

Recent Posts

Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 [6] 7 8 9 10
51
it's like a little cage.  she goes in it.  it does not go on her. 
52
Candie, I think you have clipping the queen confused with a queen clip. Clipping the queen is sniping her wings. A queen clip is similar to a hair clip made to catch and confine the queen.


lol... no I meant the actual clip. I was just wondering, because they look like the hair clips (which I speak from experience are vicious...lol) I was just wondering how it doesn't hurt her.
53
GENERAL BEEKEEPING - MAIN POSTING FORUM. / Re: Virgin queens and swarms
« Last post by don2 on April 20, 2015, 12:50:48 PM »
I have never seen it in writing that a virgin queen would leave a swarm to mate. Could be I missed that chapter. d2
54
I went back a few hours later and didn't see the swarm (BTW, it was never a ball off bees like a real swarm, it was more like a multitude of bees swarming around the decomposed log near my hive) So.... Theory number one those were my bees (maybe with the virgin queen) checking the log out for new location, but went back to the hive.... Theory number two: those were mason bees or solitary bees or other feral bees that got attracted by me spilling a drop of sugar syrup in the vicinity (not on that log) and they were just hanging out checking out the possibility of robbing thesyrup from my hive. I put in an entrance reducer a couple of days ago, so hope they will give up. I'll go back again today in full sun to see if its the same as I saw yesterday. Very puzzling!
@Kathyp
55
GENERAL BEEKEEPING - MAIN POSTING FORUM. / Re: Virgin queens and swarms
« Last post by iddee on April 20, 2015, 12:08:32 PM »
It is also said that when a virgin queen leaves the hive with a swarm, she isn't a virgin when they arrive at their home. I have no reference to that, since it dates back to before the internet.
56
GENERAL BEEKEEPING - MAIN POSTING FORUM. / Re: Virgin queens and swarms
« Last post by chux on April 20, 2015, 11:59:42 AM »
You are correct. The secondary swarm is probably the result or a virgin queen who was unable to kill her competition, but was not killed in the fight. She fled, and a number of bees went with her, accepting her as their queen. And yes, there could be more than one virgin queen in the swarm. I have seen it.
57
Candie, I think you have clipping the queen confused with a queen clip. Clipping the queen is sniping her wings. A queen clip is similar to a hair clip made to catch and confine the queen.

58
TOP BAR HIVES - WARRE HIVES - LONG HIVES / TBH nuc -> full hive transfer
« Last post by swflcpl on April 20, 2015, 11:50:48 AM »
Background:

Was originally going to do TBH throughout (2 years ago) and built one hive and was given another, along with its' matching nuc. The nuc was put in a tree on the property the first spring and caught nothing. Second year, caught nothing. Third year, this one I changed my mind and built some cedar langstroth boxes to go that route. Now Murphy set in and the TBH nuc still up in the tree of course caught a swarm this year. I have the langstroth already setup where I wanted this hive to go and moved the nuc on top of it to get their location set.

Currently:

They've been there 11 days now and I went into the nuc yesterday to check how things are coming along.  I saw this



They seem to be doing fine.  I didn't disturb them by lifting any frames but it almost looks like they followed the bars as I meant them to and am changing my mind about doing the cutout into my 8 frame mediums.

It's going to take a little bit of work to level the TBH into the same spot on which the langstroth is already sitting. I feel a good option would be to close up the nuc at night, come out at daybreak and get the TBH setup and the langstroth moved out before too many of them are awake.

My question is:

Once I do this, would I immediately transfer the bars into the full TBH or should I set the nuc on top of the full hive and reopen the entries so they go about their bee business and transfer a day or so later?

Thanks
Bobby
59
Candi,

Remember you probably got 10,000+ bees in your package.  You have a one in 10,000 chance of mashing the queen, so don't worry about it.  And the odds only get greater as the population in the hive increases.  Yes, you might crush her, but if she has already laid eggs the girls will just make a new queen from the eggs she left behind.  So don't sweat it. 

Leave them alone for a while and let the bees be bees.  They know how to take care of themselves.  Open them back up in a couple of weeks and you most likely will see capped brood, larva, eggs....and maybe even a queen. 

A TIP:  I always carry a queen clip and a marking pen in my bee jacket so if I do spot a queen, I can mark her right then and make her easier to spot in the future.

How does a queen clip not hurt her?
60
which picture?  it's always good for us to brush up on "spot the queen" :-D

In the list of pictures it's in the middle column, second to the bottom. It's the bee in the top right of the photo on the frame. :)
Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 [6] 7 8 9 10