Welcome, Guest

Recent Posts

Pages: 1 2 3 [4] 5 6 7 8 9 10
31
GENERAL BEEKEEPING - MAIN POSTING FORUM. / Re: Black Queen Now White
« Last post by bwallace23350 on April 24, 2017, 05:17:12 PM »
I think you are fine.
32
GENERAL BEEKEEPING - MAIN POSTING FORUM. / Re: Spring Time split questions OHIO
« Last post by hrtull on April 24, 2017, 04:45:32 PM »
I was prepared to make frame inspection in the newly split hive today. When I arrived at the site there was lots of activity. Bees in and out and taking lots of syrup. I know that drone cells were included in brood cells when I made the split.  A few drones were coming and going. Does the activity of drones give any indication of what  is developing in the splitting process or are they just another newly emerged bee doing its routine. I am thinking brood must be hatching and the activity is new bees stretching their wings in around the hive. I did not witness any foraging. The weather is cool, windy and overcast so I thought I would wait for a better day or maybe just leave things be. Not certain if I should do full inspection or let it run its course. What are your opinions and again, thanks for your help, HRTULL
33
GENERAL BEEKEEPING - MAIN POSTING FORUM. / Black Queen Now White
« Last post by billdean on April 24, 2017, 04:29:30 PM »
I found my best queen in my biggest hive today. A Carnelian Black beauty. First time I have ever seen her. Well, I thought I would make it easier to find her next time so I decided to mark her. I had a little round trap and pinned her lightly to the frame. My paint stick was new, never before use and I had trouble getting the paint primed on the point. Finally I got a little paint on the stick and proceeded to mark her. When I press on the round cage to mark her a big glob of white paint came out all over the queen from the neck to the tip of the abdomen. Oh crap!!! I pull the cage off her real quick and she went running off across the cells. I hurried up and put the frame back in the hive. What have I done! Possibly killed my best queen.
34
GENERAL BEEKEEPING - MAIN POSTING FORUM. / Re: Wax Worms to the Rescue!
« Last post by Bush_84 on April 24, 2017, 02:20:35 PM »
So that's great if it can be upscaled to a huge degree. Bad for a beekeeper in the area who now will have a ton of moths in the area. Lol
35
I recommend you move keep moving the frames towards the brood and then to the 2 out side frames. The bees will usually end up filling them with honey or leave them empty. Then you can remove them.
I think it is really rotten that bee breeders think that selling their defective frames in nucs is a good idea. My first hive had a really old frame that was missing most of frame holder. On one of my early inspections, that frame dropped out of box next to my right foot and I received a dozen stings to my right ankle area. Shame on them.
Jim
It's even more frustrating that a lot of nuc breeders seem to want you to give them frames in exchange, or charge you extra if you don't have a frame exchange.
36
GENERAL BEEKEEPING - MAIN POSTING FORUM. / Wax Worms to the Rescue!
« Last post by sawdstmakr on April 24, 2017, 01:41:52 PM »
The insect is able to quickly biodegrade polyethylene, the plastic used for shopping bags and food packaging

Spanish National Research Council (CSIC)
 
A research scientist at the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), Federica Bertocchini, has discovered that wax worms (Galleria mellonella), which usually feed on honey and wax from the honeycombs of bees, are capable of degrading plastic. This worm is capable of biodegrading polyethylene, one of the toughest plastic materials that exists, and which is used to make shopping bags and food packaging, amongst other things. The discovery has been patented by the research scientists. The CSIC scientist worked on this research with Paolo Bombelli and Chris Howe from the University of Cambridge. The paper will be published in the next issue of Current Biology.

Every year, around 80 million tonnes of polyethylene, a material which is extremely tough and difficult to degrade, are produced around the world. For example, low-density polyethylene plastic bags, take around 100 years to decompose completely, with the toughest, most resistant ones taking up to 400 years to break down. Every year, the average person uses more than 230 plastic bags, generating more than 100,000 tons of this type of plastic waste.

Currently, the very long processes of chemical degradation, which require the use of corrosive liquids such as nitric acid can take up to several months. This is the first time that a scientific research team has found a natural solution which has proven itself capable of degrading this material. "Plastic is a global problem. Nowadays waste can be found everywhere, including in rivers and oceans. Polyethylene in particular is very resistant, and as such is very difficult to degrade naturally", says the CSIC researcher who works at the Institute of Biomedicine and Biotechnology of Cantabria, situated in Santander, on Spain's northern coast.

"We have carried out many experiments to test the efficacy of these worms in biodegrading polyethylene. 100 wax worms are capable of biodegrading 92 milligrams of polyethylene in 12 hours, which really is very fast", says Bertocchini. Following the larva phase, the worm wraps itself in a whitish-coloured cocoon or chrysalis. The researchers also discovered that by simply having the cocoon in contact with polyethylene, the plastic biodegrades.

The composition of beeswax is similar to that of polyethylene. According to the researchers, this may be the reason why the worm has developed a mechanism to dispose of this type of plastic. "We still don't know the details of how this biodegradation occurs, but there is a possibility that an enzyme is responsible. The next step is to detect, isolate, and produce this enzyme in vitro on an industrial scale. In this way, we can begin to successfully eliminate this highly resistant material", explains Bertocchini.

A chance discovery
The scientist, who is also an amateur beekeeper, discovered this attribute of wax worms quite by chance. One day she discovered that the honeycomb panels stored in her house were covered with worms which were feeding on the leftover honey and wax from her bees.

"I removed the worms, and put them in a plastic bag while I cleaned the panels. After finishing, I went back to the room where I had left the worms and I found that they were everywhere. They had escaped from the bag even though it had been closed and when I checked, I saw that the bag was full of holes. There was only one explanation: the worms had made the holes and had escaped. This project began there and then", says the CSIC scientist.

The wax worm
The wax worm, also known as the honey worm, is a lepidopteran insect which can reach three centimeters in length in its larval phase and can be found anywhere in the world. They feed on honey and wax in beehives, where they also find a suitable temperature for their development.

Wax worm larvae have a life expectancy of between six and seven weeks at an optimal temperature for growth of 28 to 34 degrees Celsius. The larvae produce silk and make a cocoon in which they will go through their last metamorphosis: their conversion into moths.
37
GENERAL BEEKEEPING - MAIN POSTING FORUM. / Re: When to treat for mites?
« Last post by sawdstmakr on April 24, 2017, 01:34:09 PM »
I'm with Michael, I do not treat.
If the bees made it through the winter with no treatment, what makes you think you need to do it now.
Do you get regular shots of antibiotics even when you are not sick? Treating for no reason can cause more problems that you do not have now.
I would ask the supplier of the bees what he treats with first. If he didn't treat, then you probably should not treat.
Jim
38
I recommend you move keep moving the frames towards the brood and then to the 2 out side frames. The bees will usually end up filling them with honey or leave them empty. Then you can remove them.
I think it is really rotten that bee breeders think that selling their defective frames in nucs is a good idea. My first hive had a really old frame that was missing most of frame holder. On one of my early inspections, that frame dropped out of box next to my right foot and I received a dozen stings to my right ankle area. Shame on them.
Jim
39
GREETINGS/TELL US ABOUT YOURSELF / Re: Hello from Seattle WA
« Last post by sawdstmakr on April 24, 2017, 01:17:22 PM »
Welcome to Beemaster.
Jim
40
MEMBER'S WEBPAGES, BLOGS & FORUMS / Re: Buying bees in Japan
« Last post by sawdstmakr on April 24, 2017, 01:13:33 PM »
I agree, swarm traps are the way to go. I would rather have a feral swarm than a commercially raised queen any day.
Jim
Pages: 1 2 3 [4] 5 6 7 8 9 10
anything