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GENERAL BEEKEEPING - MAIN POSTING FORUM. / Re: A Queen is born
« Last post by Dallasbeek on Today at 12:57:59 PM »
I think this is a matter of interpretation, maybe.  Either way, when the bees keep larvae they intend to be queens in a sea of royal jelly throughout development, it results in a queen.  If the beebread and other stuff inhibits development of ovaries, then the royal jelly is doing the job intended.  It's puzzled me why a queen matures faster than a worker, but is developing more "parts" than a worker.  I think this has to be the royal jelly's effect.

Interesting article, though, and a good picture of queen cell larvae.
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Several (many) years back. I saw advertisements for a replacement lens that was flexible and allowed your eye to focus just like your real lens. Not sure what ever became of it. It may have been a failure.
Maybe some of our members have heard or had them and will add info about them.
Jim

A friend who is also a beekeeper has lenses that have concentric circles, where each part of the lens has a different focal point.  The brain adjusts to use the one that is in focus for what you are looking at, according to him.  He's happy with them, but they cost about $2,500 more than regular lenses -- I don't recall whether he said that was per eye or total.  I'm not sure my brain would work like that, but I don't have the money to find out, so.... 

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I'll second that. I'm hoping to, after I retire, make a living from them.
Jim
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Several (many) years back. I saw advertisements for a replacement lens that was flexible and allowed your eye to focus just like your real lens. Not sure what ever became of it. It may have been a failure.
Maybe some of our members have heard or had them and will add info about them.
Jim
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yellow jackets get a lot of them, my dog some, and birds the rest, when my dog isn't chasing the birds away.  :cool:
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Great to hear he's interested!  In the meanwhile, point him in the direction of knowledge. 
Personally, I would sell him the nucs,  discounted for a friend perhaps.  I have a lot of dollars tied up in these expensive critters and I want them to become self-supporting, not a continual money pit. 
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Dallas,
Thanks.
What lens did he put in?
Did you get the flexible lens?
Jim

Flexible?  Didn't know there was such a thing.  No, far as I know, just standard lens. Card they gave me says Abbott Medical Optics model ZCB00.
38
GENERAL BEEKEEPING - MAIN POSTING FORUM. / Re: Boosting nuc numbers
« Last post by biggraham610 on Today at 10:58:21 AM »
is there a way to make splits without foragers? just so the foragers go back to their old hive...

That's all that does go back to the old hive. The nurses have never been out, so when they orient the nuc is their home. That was my problem, too many foragers in the nuc. G
39
GENERAL BEEKEEPING - MAIN POSTING FORUM. / Extinction of the Bees
« Last post by chux on Today at 10:48:07 AM »
How many times have you heard, or said, something along these lines; "The bees have been around for millions of years. If we just let them be, they will adapt and find a way to survive with mites." I have heard very smart and well educated lecturers, bloggers, and well-meaning beeks say this.

Now, I reject the notion that bees have been around for millions of years. But let's say this were true for a moment...According to biologists who should know, species go extinct all the time on this planet. Supposedly, even before man was on earth, there were 5 mass-extinction level events, as well as other natural reasons for extinction of individual species. These scientist now claim that man causes most of the issues today which bring about species extinction.

In the debate over treatment, or non-treatment for varroa, I believe we need to keep in mind that there is a very real possibility that bees could go extinct due to varroa. Or, they could go extinct due to human's throwing poisons and prescriptions in the box. I'm just pointing out that we don't really have the promise that the bees can be saved by us, whether we treat or not. If all bee keepers stopped using chemical treatments tomorrow, we are not guaranteed that the bees will "find a way." They could disappear. Or they could survive.

Personally, I believe we have been given stewardship of a wonderful creation, in these bees. They were designed to be a critical part of this creation, and they are a delight to us. I also believe they will survive with our help in some instances, and in spite of our "help" in other instances.

All this to say, I think it is awesome that we have a growing number of beeks who are going treatment free. This gives the bee a chance to find a way to coexist with the mites. I also think it is awesome that so many beeks are using various forms of treatments to combat Varroa. This is an insurance policy in case the bees can't find a way to coexist in time. I like diversity in attacking the problem.   
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This week we are talking about Bee Friendly Plants, 7 Amazing Bee Facts and Russian Plane Attack. This is Episode seventy six of our beekeeping podcast.

You can listen to the show here:-

Springing Along with Hoppity

Here's What was discussed
  • 7 amazing things you should know about honeybees
  • 9 honeybee-friendly plants
  • Top 10 Beekeeping Books of All Time
If you enjoy the show, please tell a beekeeping friend about us.

Gary and Margaret

Ways to subscribe to our podcast The kiwimana Buzz...

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