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21
THE TRADING POST / Re: Looking for equipment in Southcentral Alaska
« Last post by kayaks on Today at 01:46:20 PM »
No well.

There is a lot of interest here in finding strains that do better through the winter. Valdez is very mild, but just driving away from the coast a hundred miles changes everything. It can be a 50 degree shift. Most beekeepers in the interior don't try to overwinter, they start over every year. I don't think it would be a problem in Southeast Alaska. Weather there is more like Vancouver or Seattle.

The body of my beehive is in our greenhouse, so I hope that helps with wintering. The Alaska Bee Initiative website link is below. They are trying to identify colonies that have survived and breed queens from that stock.

http://alaskabeeinitiative.com/
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GENERAL BEEKEEPING - MAIN POSTING FORUM. / Re: changing frame sizes
« Last post by Hi-Tech on Today at 01:45:32 PM »
I like that Idea. I was contemplating just leaving the full size hive body as the main brood box but the OCD in me screams at not converting it back to mediums..
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Thanks for the feedback. I went out and measured one of the commercial deeps and it was actually a full 9 11/16 inches high. Guess I will go with the 1"x12".
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GENERAL BEEKEEPING - MAIN POSTING FORUM. / Re: changing frame sizes
« Last post by mikecva on Today at 01:35:28 PM »
I made the mistake about not asking the nuc size and I also ended up with full size frames. A fellow beek said that he either cuts off the bottom of the frames (not the choice I chose) or construct a small frame to raise my medium box up and put the nuc frames the the bottom brood box on one end (5 and 5) then after the bees move off the nuc frames, remove them and move the medium frames to the middle and put regular frames in on the sides. As a side note, I did have to throw out some burr comb from the bottom of my medium frames.  -Mike
 
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I need some help from those who maintain or are familiar with the 55 gallon top bar barrel hives. I'm currently in the process of researching this type of hive and plan to start construction soon. I live in North central Florida near Gainesville, while we don't have very harsh winters the occasional freeze can happen, and our summers can be brutal. This is my introduction to beekeeping so I'm still not 100% sure on how bees will handle either season in this type of hive which leads to me questions.

My first question is in regards to ventilation of the hive. I have read a few different articles, and suggestions on forums about this type of hive and proper ventilation for it. I don't want the bees to cook or have a meltdown on a hot summer day and like wise freeze during one of our rare freak cold days. Some have suggested drilling two to three holes in the bottom of the barrel and I even found a few that cut a long vent down the center of the bottom. Which would be better for the bees in my area? I want them to have enough ventilation to stay cool or warm but I don't want to create extra work for them or for them to have a problem sealing or regulating the air flow through the hive due to the number of vent holes and/or the size of them.

My second question is about insulation for much of the same reasons as my first question(heating and cooling). I have read suggestions about placing a few inches of insulation between the roof and the top bars. Is this a good idea to help or is it overkill? I don't want to invest in this only to lose most if not all of my hive when it could have been avoided from the start. I included a few pictures of the venting and roofing that I found to help highlight my questions.

If anyone has any experience or can assist me with solutions to these questions i would be very appreciative.

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GENERAL BEEKEEPING - MAIN POSTING FORUM. / changing frame sizes
« Last post by Hi-Tech on Today at 11:39:19 AM »
I have always used medium hive bodies for my bees. 3 mediums for brood and mediums for supers. This keeps the weight down but more importantly makes all of my equipment consistent.

I am buying a nuke from a local beekeeper and of course, he uses deeps. I do have one deep hive body and a few frames to put these newly purchased nuke frames in but I would like to slowly work them back to medium bodies and frames.

Any suggestions?
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My husband took a 50 gallon drum and cut an area out of it to make sort of a tub. We put that over a fire, boil water, and put the skulls in it. Takes a long while but all the gunk comes off. Then you can just hang it up high and let bleach from the sun.
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OUTDOOR ACTIVITIES FORUM / Re: Slow motion
« Last post by MT Bee Girl on Today at 10:03:46 AM »
Was that a Desert Eagle?  Supposedly, that's a major bit of recoil in the .50 caliber.  And about a buck a round.  Time to get out the reloading press.

Oh lord. I shot a Desert Eagle once. Never again. That recoil is out of control! Cool video.
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GENERAL BEEKEEPING - MAIN POSTING FORUM. / Re: Frame Glue
« Last post by rober on Today at 10:02:11 AM »
Elmer's started making their carpenter glue to compete with titebond. while it is a good glue i still use tightbond. tightbond II on frames & tightbond III on boxes. it is also possible to repair frames that have been glued.
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GENERAL BEEKEEPING - MAIN POSTING FORUM. / Re: Entrance Reducer
« Last post by rober on Today at 09:45:46 AM »
i use them in the winter to help with keeping mice out & pull them when the flow starts. i also have some one bee wide reducers that i use when feeding a weaker hive.
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