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 11 
 on: Today at 10:27:15 AM 
Started by sarahplusbees - Last post by sarahplusbees
I have had a call from a fellow who has bees living in his brick building. They are definitely living inside the wall, leaving me to conclude that a trap-out is the only reasonable solution. It is however fairly late in the season, and I'm curious about how likely it is that the colony would survive. The bees have been living there for a few years, so the guy might not have a problem waiting till the Spring, and it seems a shame to rush things and kill all the bees, but on the other hand the guy's neighbors might get impatient, and I don't want to lose the job!

Would it be ok to do the removal now, or is it better to wait for Spring so the colony has a better chance of survival?

 12 
 on: Today at 10:21:11 AM 
Started by Dallasbeek - Last post by sarahplusbees
Yeah, I've been thinking about a camelback for hydration.  It's hell trying to get a drink in a bee suit.

Genius. Why didn't I think of that!?

 13 
 on: Today at 10:10:31 AM 
Started by RHBee - Last post by OldMech
Un approved or not, this IS how I treat my bees,  err...  I mean Bleach my frames, and the results have exceeded spectacular..
   I DO NOT leave the hive blocked in for ten minutes, but I do leave it blocked for a few minutes...

   I run the jumper cables from my truck battery and hook them to the Varrox Vaporizer.. I hook the hot (positive, +) cable but leav the ground unhooked..    Prepare the vaporizer, tape over the top entrance..   Slide the vaporizer into the hive and block the entrance with a rag..
   Walk back to the battery and hook the ground cable and start the stop watch..
   two and a half minutes later I unhook the ground cable...  Give it another minute, then go lift the rag and pull the vaporizer out and re block the entrance.
   Dip the vaporizer in water to cool it, and prepare the next hive. Add the OA to the vaporizer and insert it into hive two. Block with another rag and walk back to the battery..   hook the ground cable up and wait two and a half minutes..  after unhooking the ground I go to hive number one, remove the rag and the tape on the upper entrance, and take these things to hive three, and prepare it for treatment..  Remove the vaproizer from hive two and re block the entrance....    Rinse and repeat until all 40 + hives are done...

   More information can be found here;
  http://outyard.weebly.com/treatments.html

 14 
 on: Today at 10:02:04 AM 
Started by GDRankin - Last post by OldMech

   Agred with what everyone else said..  If I have a frame of brood to spare I will put that into their hive and then close them in for the night. I have had less absconding problems when I give them a frame of brood to care for..  in fact.. NO absconding problems.. but I am sure sooner or later it will happen.
   I would not be afraid to re use that equipment.

 15 
 on: Today at 09:57:47 AM 
Started by robinh - Last post by OldMech

  If you can drink your water the bees can as well.  In fact they often prefer water you wouldn't touch.  20 + years of giving bees town water, and about three of giving them our well water and I have never had an issue..   Noting the bees gathered around the outlet of the septic line, when they have three ponds, A creek, horse and cattle water tanks MUCH closer to their hives will make you go...   eeewwwwww  but bees will be bees.

 16 
 on: Today at 09:53:39 AM 
Started by kalium - Last post by OldMech

  Start the splits with a couple frames of brood and a frame of pollen/nectar or honey. Give them a queen, or  move the old queen and give the old hive the new queen. They will have a start, and rapidly begin drawing comb on the un drawn frames..   Feed them to get them up and going. A Jar of syrup with about three tiny holes in it..  this will keep them from stuffing it all in the empty cells, but will give them the resource they need to get going while they sort out their own foragers and find nectar sources.

 17 
 on: Today at 09:50:39 AM 
Started by robinh - Last post by Steel Tiger
Really?  The syrup?   If it is contaminated syrup I suppose I could see my way to believing that..   Most people do not add pesticides or other toxic things to their syrup though..

 
   Honey actually contains the same basic sugar units as table sugar. Both contain glucose and fructose. Granulated table sugar, or sucrose, has glucose and fructose hooked together, whereas in honey, fructose and glucose remain in individual units. Fructose is sweeter than glucose, which is one of the reasons fructose is used in so many food products today. However, fructose does not convert to energy as efficiently as glucose.  Saying sugar is not good for the bees is like saying bread and butter is not good for people..    If that is all you eat for months on end, your exactly right, you will not be exceptionally healthy.   The difference is that the bees WILL be bringing in their pollen and they will also be bringing in natural nectar, so the fact is, that feeding while they build comb is adding to what they get naturally, and the comb will get drawn out faster..     NO, I am not arguing that honey is better for bees than sugar, I never will, but supplemental feeding is also NOT going to cause problems like the OP is seeing.

   Without being there, or having the bees tested, I am also going to guess they mayhave gotten into some pesticides. A neighbors garden? Depending on what it was and how much, it can disorient them, and you will find them crawling about as you said.  I would keep a close eye on that and any other hives you have, and would, in fact supplement them even more with syrup and HBH if you do not have supers on in hopes of keeping them occupied while the pesticide disperses. Usually a week of feeding is enough, or if it rains to wash it off or away..
   Spotting could also be Nosema, if you have Fumadil B adding that to the syrup you are feeding may be of aid. But Nosema is usually a bigger problem when the bees are confined during winter and early spring. What you are speaking of sounds very much like they have gotten into something they didnt want to/shouldn't have.

 It's not just the sugar, it's the water as well. If using tap water to make the syrup, there could be chemicals in the water that'll harm bees, as well raising the ph. I have well water. Although I don't have to worry about chemicals, my water's ph is above 7.0. If I had to feed my bees more than a quart, I'll buy bottle water.

 18 
 on: Today at 09:43:36 AM 
Started by robinh - Last post by OldMech
Really?  The syrup?   If it is contaminated syrup I suppose I could see my way to believing that..   Most people do not add pesticides or other toxic things to their syrup though..

 
   Honey actually contains the same basic sugar units as table sugar. Both contain glucose and fructose. Granulated table sugar, or sucrose, has glucose and fructose hooked together, whereas in honey, fructose and glucose remain in individual units. Fructose is sweeter than glucose, which is one of the reasons fructose is used in so many food products today. However, fructose does not convert to energy as efficiently as glucose.  Saying sugar is not good for the bees is like saying bread and butter is not good for people..    If that is all you eat for months on end, your exactly right, you will not be exceptionally healthy.   The difference is that the bees WILL be bringing in their pollen and they will also be bringing in natural nectar, so the fact is, that feeding while they build comb is adding to what they get naturally, and the comb will get drawn out faster..     NO, I am not arguing that honey is better for bees than sugar, I never will, but supplemental feeding is also NOT going to cause problems like the OP is seeing.

   Without being there, or having the bees tested, I am also going to guess they mayhave gotten into some pesticides. A neighbors garden? Depending on what it was and how much, it can disorient them, and you will find them crawling about as you said.  I would keep a close eye on that and any other hives you have, and would, in fact supplement them even more with syrup and HBH if you do not have supers on in hopes of keeping them occupied while the pesticide disperses. Usually a week of feeding is enough, or if it rains to wash it off or away..
   Spotting could also be Nosema, if you have Fumadil B adding that to the syrup you are feeding may be of aid. But Nosema is usually a bigger problem when the bees are confined during winter and early spring. What you are speaking of sounds very much like they have gotten into something they didnt want to/shouldn't have.
   
   Putting un drawn foundation into the MIDDLE of a brood nest on a weak colony is asking for trouble. If it is a foundation-less frame you are at least not creating a barrier, but the bees will not have an easy time keeping ALL of the brood warm if you split them. If there are a lot of bees you might get away with it.

 19 
 on: Today at 09:42:30 AM 
Started by Steel Tiger - Last post by Steel Tiger
      I did look up the laws since this post the way it look to me Queens can only go one way Canada to the USA. Maybe I need to read some more to see if the is right or no and hives of bees either way.


                       BEE HAPPY Jim 134 Smiley
That's strange that a hive of bees can travel in either direction but a queen can only go one way. I guess that's the sort of thing that happens when government gets involved.

 20 
 on: Today at 09:39:47 AM 
Started by robinh - Last post by OldMech
Really?  The syrup?   If it is contaminated syrup I suppose I could see my way to believing that..   Most people do not add pesticides or other toxic things to their syrup though..

 
   Honey actually contains the same basic sugar units as table sugar. Both contain glucose and fructose. Granulated table sugar, or sucrose, has glucose and fructose hooked together, whereas in honey, fructose and glucose remain in individual units. Fructose is sweeter than glucose, which is one of the reasons fructose is used in so many food products today. However, fructose does not convert to energy as efficiently as glucose.  Saying sugar is not good for the bees is like saying bread and butter is not good for people..    If that is all you eat for months on end, your exactly right, you will not be exceptionally healthy.   The difference is that the bees WILL be bringing in their pollen and they will also be bringing in natural nectar, so the fact is, that feeding while they build comb is adding to what they get naturally, and the comb will get drawn out faster..     NO, I am not arguing that honey is better for bees than sugar, I never will, but supplemental feeding is also NOT going to cause problems like the OP is seeing.

   Without being there, or having the bees tested, I am also going to guess they mayhave gotten into some pesticides. A neighbors garden? Depending on what it was and how much, it can disorient them, and you will find them crawling about as you said.  I would keep a close eye on that and any other hives you have, and would, in fact supplement them even more with syrup and HBH if you do not have supers on in hopes of keeping them occupied while the pesticide disperses. Usually a week of feeding is enough, or if it rains to wash it off or away..
   Spotting could also be Nosema, if you have Fumadil B adding that to the syrup you are feeding may be of aid. But Nosema is usually a bigger problem when the bees are confined during winter and early spring. What you are speaking of sounds very much like they have gotten into something they didnt want to/shouldn't have.

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