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Are you feeding them?

I am feeding some hives 2:1 because they have had some issues.... They all of a sudden have frames full of "water" which I figured was actually Syrup, not nectar.

All- Do they store syrup too?

Yes, they store syrup.
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GENERAL BEEKEEPING - MAIN POSTING FORUM. / Tempting a queen
« Last post by NeilTheCop on Today at 02:54:36 PM »
I did my 2nd ever cut out a few days ago from the ceiling of an outbuilding.
Looked straightforward, I could see the entrance and the ceiling was nailed on OSB, but after a short time I found it was also glued, so the bees were far from happy with all the noise, and made their displeasure known :cry:
Anyway, finally got the bees vacuumed out and the brood/larve/eggs put in frames, plus about 60 pounds of wildflower honey :cool:
But, between the joists about 12 feet back from the nest were a big ball of bees which I assume contain the queen as I couldn't find here anywhere else.
I'm loathe to use the vac to try and get her out in case I injure or kill her, and it's too far back to try and somehow coral her and pull her forward.
Is there any way to tempt her out of hiding so I can get a catcher around her?

As a side-note, do not attempt to remove angry bees in 97 degree heat while fully suited. The cramps you get later from dehydration are agony, many times worse than the single sting I got on my bicep :oops:
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I thought bees really like thistle! I would like it if it wernt thorny
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GENERAL BEEKEEPING - MAIN POSTING FORUM. / Re: hive pictures
« Last post by YpsiBee2015 on Today at 02:45:37 PM »
Right, and thats my dilemma too...plus my hive is sometimes in broken shade, so some parts of the picture at super dark.....
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GENERAL BEEKEEPING - MAIN POSTING FORUM. / Re: hive pictures
« Last post by Eric Bosworth on Today at 02:35:28 PM »
How many bees were required to pollinate an apple tree that grows phones? I could probably do that with my phone. But the problem I have is not having enough hands and or coordination to hold the frame and the camera and take the picture.
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Are you feeding them?

I am feeding some hives 2:1 because they have had some issues.... They all of a sudden have frames full of "water" which I figured was actually Syrup, not nectar.

All- Do they store syrup too?
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GENERAL BEEKEEPING - MAIN POSTING FORUM. / Re: hive pictures
« Last post by YpsiBee2015 on Today at 01:46:50 PM »
I have used Siri on my iPhone 5s. I ask hold down the button, ask her to open the camera, then use the volume up or down buttons to "snap" a picture. Then I can hold things, keep my gloves on, etc.

The key being using the volume buttons as the shutter button on the app. Might work with other photo apps too.

I found that when I tried using my DSLR, it was to cumbersome
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I built Phil Chandlers design though it has a 7 1/2 inch bottom- half of the top width.  He uses a screen bottom, but I put a solid board under the screen using a 1x8. I know there are many different designs, and as long as you plan to have at least 2 hives you can swap frames as needed.  In my area everyone does top bar so that's not a problem, but I suppose if your other hive is a Lang and your peers use Langs you might want to make the long Lang box. Lang keepers are used to having the frame around the comb and feel more comfortable with this, but I have found that once you learn how to hold the top bars (watch someone!) you can turn the comb at different angles to look at it without danger of it falling off- unless it's brand new white comb which you have to be careful with.

I am having lots of fun and chanllenging and exciting experiences with my 3 top bar hives and plan to keep going with them!  Good luck with your many choices!
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 :grin:
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From "The Hive and the Honeybee" - Management of package bees :

"There comes a critical time in the progress of the package colony, usually about 3 weeks after it is hived when the new brood produced from the eggs of the queen reached a relatively high point in proportion to the number of adult bees. Many of the (package bees) will have died, and no young bees will have emerged. It is often at this time that supercedure ... occurs..., probably because the population is out of balance. This can largely be overcome by giving the package colony a comb of emerging brood and bees from a healthy colony, placing this comb next to the brood combs in the package colony. This should be done about two weeks after the package is installed; colonies so treated will gain surprisingly in strength."
------------------

I do this all the time. Sprinkling a little syrup on both the new frame of brood, and across the top of the package colony brood frames greatly enhances the introduction. "Surprisingly" is an understatement, in my experience. I've frequently seen packages pack in 100-150 lbs of surplus in the first season.
 
The key seems to be "the population is out of balance...". Sometimes tearing down those queen cells gives the bees just enough time to re-establish the balance. Other times it can be disastrous - for example if the reining queen is already gone. Michael is
probably right - perhaps the best thing to do is to just let them sort it out.
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