Need Bees Removed?
International
Beekeeping Forums
December 25, 2014, 05:15:11 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: ATTENTION ALL NEW MEMBERS
PLEASE READ THIS OR YOUR ACCOUNT MAY BE DELETED - CLICK HERE
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar bee removal Login Register Chat  

Pages: [1] 2  All   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: 1st inspection of 2012  (Read 2240 times)
Robo
Technical
Administrator
Galactic Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 6436


Location: Scenic Catskill Mountains - NY

Beekeep On!


WWW
« on: February 10, 2012, 02:23:47 PM »

Did a quick check on 17 hives today before our next cold spell hits tonight.   It has been a mild winter and I know there is a lot of talk about bees using more stores when the weather is mild.   Most of the hives I checked where either single deeps of 5 frame nucs.   I figured these would be the ones that might need feeding.  It also included a few 1 deep/1medium hives.

I was pleasantly surprised with what I found.   All 17 where not only alive,  but loaded with bees and still had plenty of stores.  It was too cold and windy to pull frames,  but I could see plenty of capped honey from above.





I know at times I take a lot of flack from those who are strong supporters of creating ventilation.  But I still attempt to replicate what the feral colonies around here do. These hives are all polystyrene with no upper ventilation.  Some have a 2" insulation shim, all have 2" insulation covers. They have a 3/8" x 3" bottom entrance.   The hives where last opened in the beginning of October which gave the bees plenty of time to seal all cracks, which they did.  None had any signs of moisture or dysentery.

The first two where 5-frame nucs (actually two 2-frame queen mating nucs) that where moved into the 10-frame poly hives in September.  The last was a full sized hive.

Logged

"Opportunity is missed by most people because it comes dressed in overalls and looks like work." - Thomas Edison


ronwhite3030
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 218

Location: Red Bluff, CA


« Reply #1 on: February 10, 2012, 03:04:24 PM »

they look good i checked yesterday when it was 70 degrees where I live 4 out of the 6 looked good the other two looked very light on bees only a couple of frames worth I might put them in a 5 frame nuc when it warms up again, and hold them there till april.
Logged
tefer2
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2285

Location: Kalamazoo,MI


« Reply #2 on: February 10, 2012, 05:24:24 PM »

I checked the first twenty five yesterday. Just a quick look for resources. Glad I placed some candy bricks on the light ones though. Second time looking this year. Not much winter here for us. I'm just happy they are alive!
Rob, what happens to the warm moist air when it rises to the top of those nucs? Does it just run back down the sides?
I chickened out and put top entrances on mine.
Logged
backyard warrior
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 475

Location: NE PA


« Reply #3 on: February 10, 2012, 07:26:27 PM »

tefer thats what i am afraid of the moisture raining on the bees.  I have seen alot of moisture in hives i didnt put a top entrance on and decided the top vent was best.  Chris
Logged
Sparky
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 804


Location: Hagerstown MD


« Reply #4 on: February 10, 2012, 07:48:30 PM »

It's nice to see picks of hives that look like that to start the season. That full size hive is going to be splitting at the seams come spring at that rate. Thanks ! for sharing the encouraging pics.
Logged
tefer2
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2285

Location: Kalamazoo,MI


« Reply #5 on: February 10, 2012, 08:52:12 PM »

 If you think about it, bees in a tree don't have a top entrance that I've seen. Must be something else helping absorb the excess moisture in nature.
Logged
Robo
Technical
Administrator
Galactic Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 6436


Location: Scenic Catskill Mountains - NY

Beekeep On!


WWW
« Reply #6 on: February 10, 2012, 09:19:17 PM »

Rob, what happens to the warm moist air when it rises to the top of those nucs? Does it just run back down the sides?

This is just my opinion, but I believe the biggest mistake made is not providing enough insulation above the colony and by letting the heat escape.  Think about your home,  where is the most insulation,  in the ceiling.   Heat rises and if the top is insulated enough,  condensation will not occur above them.    

I also don't buy into the "bees don't heat the hive, only the cluster"  or "cold doesn't kill bees, moisture does".  I'm a firm believer in heat and scent retention,  it seems to work well for the ferals.  I also don't feed any syrup aster October 1st, giving them time to dry it before it gets really cold.  
Logged

"Opportunity is missed by most people because it comes dressed in overalls and looks like work." - Thomas Edison


jmblakeney
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 484


Location: Anderson Co., Tennessee,

James


« Reply #7 on: February 10, 2012, 09:43:45 PM »

Rob, those hives look great.  Looks like what your doing is working great.

James
Logged

"I believe the best social program is a job...." - Ronald Reagan
Joe D
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2011

Location: Ovett, Ms


« Reply #8 on: February 10, 2012, 10:12:12 PM »

rob

Those are some good looking bees and hives.  I don't have the winters that a lot of you do, one less thing for me to worry about. 

Great Job

Joe
Logged
buzzbee
Ken
Administrator
Galactic Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 5533


Location: North Central PA


WWW
« Reply #9 on: February 11, 2012, 07:49:27 AM »

Moisture condenses at the coldest point first. And hopefully thats not the top of the hive.If the fllor is a little cooler ,the moisture condenses there.
Logged
tefer2
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2285

Location: Kalamazoo,MI


« Reply #10 on: February 11, 2012, 08:29:33 AM »

Rob, you must be doing something right by the looks of those bees. I like your idea of no syrup after Oct. 1ST.
My buddy down the road leaves his screened bottoms open all winter. Imagine the wind blowing up your dress,  as my wife puts it.  grin
Logged
Robo
Technical
Administrator
Galactic Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 6436


Location: Scenic Catskill Mountains - NY

Beekeep On!


WWW
« Reply #11 on: February 11, 2012, 11:56:30 AM »

My buddy down the road leaves his screened bottoms open all winter. Imagine the wind blowing up your dress,  as my wife puts it.  grin

And I'm sure he swears by it.   Have any open air colonies in Michigan?


To quote Michael Bush - Bees continue to survive despite our help........
Logged

"Opportunity is missed by most people because it comes dressed in overalls and looks like work." - Thomas Edison


tefer2
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2285

Location: Kalamazoo,MI


« Reply #12 on: February 11, 2012, 02:28:11 PM »

No open air here. bout the only one I have seen, was a pine tree snapped in half exposing them to mother nature. They hung there all summer, till I hauled them home with me. Could never figure out how they survived through all the rain and wind blowing on them.
Logged
squarepeg
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 9

Location: jackson co., alabama


« Reply #13 on: February 11, 2012, 02:31:46 PM »

> If you think about it, bees in a tree don't have a top entrance that I've seen. Must be something else helping absorb the excess moisture in nature.

i think that something might be thicker, more absorbant walls, and a ceiling that doesn't get too cold.  i agree with robo about insulating the top, and i like a little venting up there too.
Logged
BlueBee
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 4514

Location: Mid Michigan


« Reply #14 on: February 11, 2012, 03:12:47 PM »

Robo, the hives look great!

Moisture condenses at the coldest point first. And hopefully thats not the top of the hive.If the floor is a little cooler ,the moisture condenses there.
I’ve never yet gotten out of the shower and found all the water vapor condensed on the floor.  Where is the vent in your bathroom?  Ceiling or floor?
Logged
Robo
Technical
Administrator
Galactic Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 6436


Location: Scenic Catskill Mountains - NY

Beekeep On!


WWW
« Reply #15 on: February 11, 2012, 09:47:25 PM »

Can't speak for your bees, but mine nor the ferals around here shower.... rolleyes
Logged

"Opportunity is missed by most people because it comes dressed in overalls and looks like work." - Thomas Edison


BlueBee
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 4514

Location: Mid Michigan


« Reply #16 on: February 11, 2012, 09:53:53 PM »

I have given mine a shower or two, but I’m trying to fix that now   grin
Logged
jajtiii
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 62

Location: Varina, Virginia


WWW
« Reply #17 on: February 18, 2012, 03:16:09 AM »

I went in 6 hives and 4 nucs today, for my first inspections (I actually pulled frames, but it's warmer down my way.) I was driven by the same thing you were (a lot of talk about running out of stores due to the mild winter) and a desire to see if I had drone brood (or even walking drones.)

All six hives had plenty of stores left. Only one of the Nucs was out of food (and would have perished), but they were a special case (a very late swarm last year that did not have time to stock it away.)

Lots more hives to check, but I am encouraged. In my few years of beekeeping, the doom and gloom rarely holds true for me (knock on wood.) But, I always worry until i check em out.

As a side note, I did find walking drones. Plus, my hives are much further along then normal (which should be expected, based on the Winter.) I think this is going to be called the Year of the Swarm.
Logged

buzzbee
Ken
Administrator
Galactic Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 5533


Location: North Central PA


WWW
« Reply #18 on: February 18, 2012, 08:00:34 AM »

I checked under the lids of the two nucs I got from Bjorn last summer. First hive the cluster is at the top, and eating at the sugar above them. I opened up number two and saw nothing. Hmmm,so i lift the top box,still heavy with stores,and sure enough this cluster moved from the top back to the bottom box.
Both look pretty good. I also checked on the swarm I gathered off a phone pole in August. They seem to be thriving. So all is good at this point. Smiley
Logged
backyard warrior
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 475

Location: NE PA


« Reply #19 on: February 18, 2012, 08:12:54 AM »

Robo i think you are right heat retention if very important especially when they are rearing brood in early spring.  I have insulation on the top of the hive to keep them warm and keep the condensation from dripping on them.  The ones that have a little notch on the top are enjoying the top entrance and i have my hives insulated especially on top.   Your clusters look great too Smiley
Logged
Pages: [1] 2  All   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Beemaster's Beekeeping Ring
Previous | Home | Join | Random | Next
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines | Sitemap Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.369 seconds with 21 queries.

Google visited last this page November 11, 2014, 03:51:40 AM
anything